Contact Us

Department of Animal Science
Anthony Hall
474 S. Shaw Lane
East Lansing, MI
48824-1225

Phone: (517) 355-8383
Fax: (517) 353-1699
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Academic Grievance Hearing Procedures for Graduate Students

Each right of an individual places a reciprocal duty upon others: the duty to permit the individual to exercise the right. The student, as a member of the academic community, has both rights and duties. Within that community, the student’s most essential right is the right to learn. The University has a duty to provide for the student those privileges, opportunities, and protections that best promote the learning process in all its aspects. The student also has duties to other members of the academic community, the most important of which is to refrain from interference with those rights of others which are equally essential to the purposes and processes of the University. (GSRR Article 1.2)

The Graduate Student Rights and Responsibilities (GSRR) document establishes the rights and responsibilities of MSU graduate students and prescribe procedures for resolving allegations of violations of those rights through formal grievance hearings. In accordance with the GSRR, the Department of Animal Science has established the following Hearing Board procedures for adjudicating academic grievances and complaints. (See GSRR 5.4)

I.  JURISDICTION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL SCIENCE HEARING BOARD:

 

A.  The Hearing Board serves as:

 

 

1.    The initial Hearing Board for academic grievance hearings involving graduate students who allege violations of academic rights and for graduate students who seek to contest an allegation of academic misconduct (academic dishonesty, violations of professional standards or falsifying admission and academic records). (See GSRR 2.3 and 5.1.1)

 

 

2.    Students may not request an academic grievance hearing based on an allegation of incompetent instruction. (See GSRR 2.2.2)

II.  COMPOSITION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL SCIENCE HEARING BOARD:

 

A.    The Department shall constitute a Hearing Board no later than the end of the tenth week of spring semester from a pool of faculty and students.  The pool shall consist of 6 graduate students and 6 faculty serving a 1-year term. (See GSRR 5.1.2 and 5.1.6)

 

B.    The Hearing Board shall include the Chair of the Hearing Board who is a faculty member with rank and an equal number of 3 graduate students and 3 faculty, including the Department Chair designee. (See GSRR 5.1.2, and 5.1.5.)

 

C.    All members of the Hearing Board shall vote, except the Chair of the Hearing Board, who shall vote only in the event of a tie.

 

D.   By September 1 of each academic year, all new members of the Hearing Board pools will be trained about these procedures and the applicable sections of the GSRR. (See GSRR 5.1.3)

III.  REFERRAL TO DEPARTMENT HEARING BOARD:

 

A.    After consulting with the instructor and the Department Chair, or designee, graduate students who remain dissatisfied with their attempt to resolve an allegation of a violation of student academic rights may request an academic grievance hearing.  (See GSRR 5.3.2.)

 

B.    In cases of ambiguous jurisdiction, the Dean of The Graduate School will select the appropriate unit Hearing Board for cases involving graduate students. (See GSRR 5.3.5)

 

C.    Generally, the deadline for submitting the written request for a hearing is the middle of the next semester in which the student is enrolled (including Summer). In cases in which a student seeks to contest an allegation of academic misconduct, and the student’s dean has called for an academic disciplinary hearing, the student has 10 class days to file a written request for a hearing before the appropriate hearing board. (See GSRR 5.3.6.1 and 5.5.2.2)

 

D.   If either the student (the complainant) or the respondent (usually, the instructor or an administrator) is absent from the university during that semester, or if other appropriate reasons emerge, the Hearing Board may grant an extension of this deadline.  If the university no longer employs the respondent before the grievance hearing commences, the hearing may proceed.  (See GSRR 5.3.6.1 and 5.4.9.)

 

E.    A written request for an academic grievance hearing must (1) specify the alleged violation(s), (2) identify the individual against whom the grievance is filed (the respondent) and (3) state the desired redress.  Anonymous grievances will not be accepted. (See GSRR 5.1 and 5.3.6)

IV.  PRE-HEARING PROCEDURES:

 

A.    After receiving a student’s written request for a hearing, the Chair of the Department, or designee, will randomly select four faculty members and three students from the hearing board pools to constitute the Hearing Board and will promptly refer the grievance to the Chair of the Hearing Board.  The faculty member with seniority or rank shall serve as Chair of the Hearing Board. (See GSRR 5.1.5, 5.3.2, 5.4.3)

 

B.    Within 5 class days, the Chair of the Hearing Board will:

 

 

1.    forward the request for a hearing to the respondent;

 

 

2.    send the names of Hearing Board members to both parties and, to avoid conflicts of interest between the two parties and the Hearing Board members, request written challenges, if any, within 3 class days of this notification;

 

 

3.    rule promptly on any challenges, impanel a Hearing Board and send each party the names of the Hearing Board members. If the Chair of the Hearing Board is the subject of a challenge, the second faculty chair will be appointed instead. If there is a challenge with regards to the second chair, it shall be filed with the Dean of the College, or designee (see GSRR 5.1.7); and

 

 

4.    send the Hearing Board members a copy of the request for a hearing and the written response, and send all parties a copy of these procedures.

 

C.    Within 5 class days of being established, the Hearing Board shall review the request, and, after considering all requested and submitted information:

 

 

1.    accept the request, in full or in part, and promptly schedule a hearing.

 

 

2.    reject the request and provide a written explanation to appropriate parties; e.g., lack of jurisdiction. (The student may appeal this decision.)

 

 

3.    invite the two parties to meet with the Hearing Board in an informal session to try to resolve the matter. Such a meeting does not preclude a later hearing. However, by the time a grievance is requested, all informal methods of conflict resolution should have been exhausted so this option is rarely used. (See GSRR 5.4.6.)

 

D.   If the Hearing Board calls for a hearing, the Hearing Board Chair shall promptly negotiate a hearing date, schedule an additional meeting only for the Hearing Board should additional deliberations on the findings become necessary, and request a written response to the grievance from the respondent.

 

E.    At least 5 class days before the scheduled hearing, the Chair of the Hearing Board shall notify the respondent and the complainant in writing of the (1) time, date, and place of the hearing; (2) the names of the parties to the grievance; and (3) a copy of the hearing request and the respondent’s reply; and (4) the names of the Hearing Board members after any challenges. (See GSRR 5.4.7)

 

F.    At least 3 class days before the scheduled hearing, the parties must notify the Chair of the Hearing Board of the names of their witnesses and advisor, if any, and request permission for the advisor to have voice at the hearing. The Chair may grant or deny this request. The Chair will promptly forward the names given by the complainant to the respondent and vice versa. (See GSRR 5.4.7.1)

 

G.   The Chair of the Hearing Board may accept written statements from either party’s witnesses at least 3 class days before the hearing. (See GSRR 5.4.9)

 

H.   In unusual circumstances and in lieu of a personal appearance, either party may request permission to submit a written statement to the Hearing Board or request permission to participate in the hearing through an electronic communication channel. Written statements must be submitted to the Hearing Board at least 3 class days before the scheduled hearing. (See GSRR 5.4.9c.)

 

I.     Either party to the grievance hearing may request a postponement of the hearing. The Hearing Board may either grant or deny the request. (See GSRR 5.4.8.)

 

J.     At its discretion, the Hearing Board may set a reasonable time limit for each party to present its case, and the Chair of the Hearing Board must inform the parties of such a time limit in the written notification of the hearing.

 

K.    Hearings are closed unless the student requests an open hearing, which would be open to all members of the MSU community.  The Hearing Board may close an open hearing to protect the confidentiality of information or to maintain order. (See GSRR 5.4.10.4)

 

L.    Members of the Hearing Board are expected to respect the confidentiality of the hearing process. (See GSRR 5.4.10.4 and 5.4.11)

V.   HEARING PROCEDURES:

 

A.    The Hearing will proceed as follows:

 

 

1.    Introductory remarks by the Chair of the Hearing Board:

       The Chair of the Hearing Board introduces hearing panel members, the complainant, the respondent and advisors, if any.  The Chair reviews the hearing procedures, including announced time restraints for presentations by each party and   the witnesses, and informs the parties if their advisors may have a voice in the hearings and if the proceedings are being recorded. Witnesses shall be excluded from the proceedings except when testifying.  The Chair also explains:

 

 

 

a.    In academic grievance hearings in which a student alleges a violation of academic rights, the student bears the burden of proof.

 

 

 

b.    In hearings involving graduate students seeking to contest allegations of academic misconduct, the instructor bears the burden of proof.

 

 

 

c.    All Hearing Board decisions must be reached by a majority of the Hearing Board, based on “clear and convincing evidence.” (See GSRR 8.1.18)

 

 

(See GSRR 5.4.10.1 and 8.1.18.  For various definitions, see GSRR Article 8)

 

 

2.    If the complainant fails to appear in person or via an electronic channel at a scheduled hearing, the Hearing Board may either postpone the hearing or dismiss the case for demonstrated cause. (See GSRR 5.4.9a)

 

 

3.    If the respondent fails to appear in person or via an electronic channel at a scheduled hearing, the Hearing Board may postpone the hearing, hear the case in the respondent’s absence. (See GSRR 5.4.9b)

 

 

4.    If the respondent is absent from the University during the semester of the grievance hearing or no longer employed by the University before the grievance procedure concludes, the hearing process may still proceed.  (See GSRR 5.3.6.1)

 

 

5.    To assure orderly questioning, the Chair of the Hearing Board will recognize individuals before they speak.  All parties have a right to speak without interruption. Each party has a right to question the other party and to rebut any oral or written statements submitted to the Hearing Board.  (See GSRR 5.4.10.2)

 

 

6.    Presentation by the Complainant: The Chair recognizes the complainant to present without interruption any statements relevant to the complainant’s case, including the redress sought. The Chair then recognizes questions directed at the complainant by the Hearing Board, the respondent and the respondent’s advisor, if any.

 

 

7.    Presentation by the Complainant’s Witnesses: The Chair recognizes the complainant’s witnesses, if any, to present, without interruption, any statement directly relevant to the complainant’s case. The Chair then recognizes questions directed at the witnesses by the Hearing Board, the respondent, and the respondent’s advisor, if any.

 

 

8.    Presentation by the Respondent: The Chair recognizes the respondent to present without interruption any statements relevant to the respondent’s case. The Chair then recognizes questions directed at the respondent by the Hearing Board, the complainant, and the complainant’s advisor, if any.

 

 

9.    Presentation by the Respondent’s Witnesses: The Chair recognizes the respondent’s witnesses, if any, to present, without interruption, and statement directly relevant to the respondent’s case. The Chair then recognizes questions directed at the witnesses by the Hearing Board, the complainant, and the complainant’s advisor, if any.

 

 

10.  Rebuttal and Closing Statement by Complainant:  The complainant refutes statements by the respondent, the respondent’s witnesses and advisor, if any, and presents a final summary statement.

 

 

11.  Rebuttal and Closing Statement by Respondent:  The respondent refutes statements by the complainant, the complainant’s witnesses and advisor, if any, and presents a final summary statement.

 

 

12.  Final questions by the Hearing Board: The Hearing Board asks questions of any of the participants in the hearing.

VI. POST-HEARING PROCEDURES

 

A.    Deliberation:

 

 

1.    After all evidence has been presented, with full opportunity for explanations, questions and rebuttal, the Chair of the Hearing Board shall excuse all parties to the grievance and convene the Hearing Board to determine its findings in executive session. When possible, deliberations should take place directly following the hearing and/or at the previously scheduled follow-up meeting. (See Section IV.D above)

 

B.    Decision:

 

 

1.    In grievance (non-disciplinary) hearings involving graduate students in which a majority of the Hearing Board finds, based on “clear and convincing evidence,” that a violation of the student’s academic rights as occurred and that redress is possible, it shall recommend an appropriate remedy to the Department Chair. Upon receiving the Hearing Board’s recommendation, the Department Chair shall implement an appropriate remedy, in consultation with the Hearing Board, within 3 class days. If the Hearing Board finds that no violation of academic rights has occurred, it shall so inform the Department Chair. The Chair of the Hearing Board shall promptly forward copies of the final decision to parties and the University Ombudsperson. (See GSRR 5.4.11)

 

 

2.    In grievance (non-disciplinary) hearings involving graduate students in which the Hearing Board serves as the initial hearing body to adjudicate an allegation of academic dishonesty and, based on “clear and convincing evidence”, the Hearing Board finds for the student, the Hearing Board shall recommend to the Chair that the penalty grade be removed, the Academic Dishonesty Report form be removed from the student’s records and a “good faith judgment” of the student’s academic performance in the course take place. If the Hearing Board finds for the instructor, the penalty grade shall stand and the Academic Dishonesty Report form regarding the allegation will remain on file, pending an appeal, if any, to the College Hearing Board within 5 class days of the Hearing Board’s decision. If an academic disciplinary hearing is pending, and the Hearing Board decides for the instructor, the graduate student’s disciplinary hearing before either the College Hearing Board or the Dean of The Graduate School would promptly follow, pending an appeal, if any, within 5 class days.  (See GSRR 5.4.12.3 and 5.5.2.2)

 

C.    Written Report

 

 

1.    The Chair of the Hearing Board shall prepare a written report of the Hearing Board’s findings, including recommended redress or sanctions for the complainant, if applicable, and forward a copy of the decision to the appropriate unit administrator within 3 class days of the hearing.  The report shall indicate the rationale for the decision and the major elements of evidence, or lack thereof, that support the Hearing Board’s decision. The administrator, in consultation with the Hearing Board, shall then implement an appropriate remedy. The report also should inform the parties of the right to appeal within 5 class days following notice of the decision, or 5 class days if an academic disciplinary hearing is pending. The Chair shall forward copies of the Hearing Board’s report and the administrator’s redress, if applicable, to the parties involved, the responsible administrators, the University Ombudsperson and the Dean of The Graduate School. All recipients must respect the confidentiality of the report and of the hearing board’s deliberations resulting in a decision.  (See GSRR 5.4.12 and 5.5.2.2)

VII. APPEAL OF DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL SCIENCE HEARING BOARD DECISION:

 

A.    In hearings involving graduate students, either party may appeal a decision by the Hearing Board to the College Hearing Board for cases involving (1) academic grievances alleging violations of student rights heard initially by the Hearing Board and (2) alleged violations of regulations involving academic misconduct (academic dishonesty, professional standards or falsification of admission and academic records). (See GSRR 5.4.12)

 

B.    All appeals must be in writing, signed and submitted to the College Hearing Board within 5 class days following notification of the Hearing Board’s decision. While under appeal, the original decision of the Hearing Board will be held in abeyance. (See GSRR 5.4.12, 5.4.12.2 and 5.4.12.3)

 

C.    A request for an appeal of a Hearing Board decision to the College Hearing Board must allege, in sufficient particularity to justify a hearing, that the initial Hearing Board failed to follow applicable procedures for adjudicating the hearing or that findings of the Hearing Board were not supported by “clear and convincing evidence.”  The request also must include the redress sought.  Presentation of new evidence normally will be inappropriate.  (See GSRR 5.4.12.1, 5.4.12.2 and 5.4.12.4)

VIII. RECONSIDERATION:

 

If new evidence should arise, either party to a hearing may request the Hearing Board to reconsider the case within 30 days upon receipt of the hearing outcome. The written request for reconsideration is to be sent to the Chair of the Hearing Board, who shall promptly convene the Hearing Board to review the new material and render a decision on a new hearing. (See GSRR 5.4.13)

IX. FILE COPY:

 

The Chair of the Department shall file a copy of these procedures with the Office of the Ombudsperson and with the Dean of The Graduate School. (See GSRR 5.4.1)

Approved February 20, 2015

Transfer Students

As a prospective student looking at transferring to Michigan State University, there are several questions you need to keep in mind, such as, “How do I transfer my current credits?” and “Are my credits transferable?” Below you will find the information necessary to answer these questions, with information on the transfer process, graduate requirements, and credit equivalents.

The Transfer Process

Students seeking to transfer from their current institution of study to Michigan State University’s Department of Animal Science should check the transfer eligibility of the credits he/she currently has. Determining transfer eligibility may be done by visiting either the Transfer MSU or MSU Transfer Guide. This may seem a daunting task but is truthfully a relatively easy one when using the before-mentioned tools.

In addition to verifying the transfer eligibility of one’s current credits, students will need to meet with an advisor within the Department of Animal Science. Contact Tracy Rich via email at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or by calling 517-353-9227 to set-up an advising appointment. Once an advising appointment has been made your assigned advisor will help form a personalized academic plan.

Prospective Students

As a prospective student looking at Michigan State University, there are several questions you need to keep in mind, such as, “How do I apply and enroll in classes?” and, “Is there any aid to help me finance this education?” Below you will find the information necessary to answer these questions, with information on the application process, financial aid, and scholarships.

The Application Process

Admission to Michigan State University is competitive, but there are no minimum requirements. MSU strongly encourages a college preparatory curriculum in high school and to apply early within your senior year. Factors that will affect your application and admission are:

  • your academic performance in high school
  • the strength and quality of your curriculum
  • recent trends in your academic performance
  • your class rank
  • your ACT or SAT results
  • your leadership, talents, conduct, and diversity of experience

Freshman Profile (Fall, 2013)*

The average range of statistics for previous admission years are shown below to provide you, as a prospective student, the ability to gage your academic standing against that of the pool of applicants. (* middle 50 percent of enrolled freshmen; numbers may fluctuate slightly as students confirm/cancel enrollment)

  • High school GPA: 3.4-3.9
  • Composite ACT: 23-28
  • Composite SAT (Critical Reading and Math): 1040-1210

Application

To apply for admission at MSU, a prospective student will need to complete the online application form. This application will be processed within 8 - 12 weeks after all required information has been provided. Required information includes: the online application form, a personal statement, high school transcripts, and ACT or SAT scores (sent directly to MSU from the testing agency). An application fee waiver may be included as well, please note international students do not qualify for a fee waiver. For more details regarding the MSU Application Process, please visit the MSU Office of Admissions.

Scholarships

Financing your secondary education is an important factor when determining which college or university you would like to attend. Here a MSU there are many scholarship opportunities! The Department of Animal Science has a wide range of scholarships students may apply for, many of which are industry funded! Click here for the current list of scholarships available within the Department of Animal Science. These opportunities help you build your professional network while engaging your knowlege of the animal industry. The MSU Office of Admissions, also, offers incoming freshmen the opportunity to apply for scholarships, which may be found here, along with more information on the affordability of MSU‘s undergraduate and graduate degrees.

Financial Aid

In addition to scholarships, students attending MSU may be eligible for additional financing options, which may be found at the MSU Office of Financial Aid.

Electronic Forms

When the teaching activity involves using animals (not just observing animals on the farm) as a part of the course whether the activity takes place at MSU or at a private farm/facility an AUF is required for the course. If there are procedures performed on an animal and the procedures are covered in an IACUC approved SOP or in the MSU farm’s Veterinary Medical Guidelines you can list the procedure in the AUF and reference the appropriate document. Make sure you are listing what is actually described in the document. Do not assume that it is in the document. If the procedure being performed on an animal is not covered in these documents then you must describe the procedure in your AUF with enough detail that an outside reviewer (possibly with a different species background) can understand what is being done to the animal.

Current forms can be found at: http://animalcare.msu.edu/AUF.

You would then go to http://Web2.msue.msu.edu/AnimalUse, login with your MSU Net ID and create a new project.

Internal Information

The Department of Animal Science (ANS) maintains livestock farms that produce and house agricultural animals that are used across the MSU community. The livestock farms are an integral part of the teaching, extension and research programs in the Department of Animal Science.

For information regarding the use of animals at the livestock farms, please download the following form:

Use_of_Animals_in_ANS_Teaching_8-19-14.pdf

If your course involves direct contact with live vertebrate animals for the purpose of demonstration or hands on student participation you need to complete an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) Animal Use Form (AUF) for your course. If the animals are from an Animal Science farm an Animal Science Department Animal Use Form is also required.

Job Postings

In addition to our own postings, the Department of Animal Science occasionally receives announcements for job postings from other universities and organizations. Below are links to all of the job announcements:

University of Arkansas, Department of Animal Science - Faculty_Position_in_Equine_Science.pdf (Review of applications begins on June 15, 2015)

California Polytechnic State University, Animal Sciences Department - Assistant-Associate_Professor_in_Meat_Food_Safety-Microbiology.pdf (Review of applications begins on June 22, 2015)

University of Guelph, Ontario Agricultural College, Department of Animal and Poultry Science - Assistant-Associate_Professor-Beef_Cattle_Nutrition.pdf (Application deadline, July 1, 2015)

Michigan State University, Department of Animal Science - Assistant_Professor_Reproductive_Biology_Farm_Animals.pdf (Application deadline, November 1, 2015)

Michigan State University, Department of Animal Science - Research_Associate_Swine_Genetics_and_Behavior.pdf (Application deadline, November 1, 2015)

Michigan State University, Department of Animal Science - Academic_Specialist-Advisor.pdf (Application deadline, July 15, 2015)

External Links

Job Postings

The American Society of Animal Science

Retired

Species

Animal agriculture is extremely important to the future of Michigan, the United States and the world. Likewise, it has played a critical role in the history of Michigan State. As the pioneering land-grant university, MSU has always valued animal agriculture. From the days when the department was known as Animal Husbandry, our department continues to appreciate the importance of livestock and has many outstanding faculty and staff with a tremendous amount of expertise working with various livestock species. The department maintains strong teaching, research and extension/outreach programs in beef, dairy, horses, poultry, sheep and swine. Such programs are critical to the education of students and producers, and aid in solving problems faced by the agricultural community, as we work to better serve the animal industries.

Academic Advisors

Each student is responsible for knowing the university, college, and department requirements as stated in the MSU Academic Programs. Students must complete the graduation requirements that were in effect at the time the student entered the ANS major unless he/she elects to complete a curriculum adopted by the ANS department at a later time.

Each freshman or transfer student will be assigned an academic advisor in ANS during the Academic Orientation program (AOP). In addition to an academic advisor, students are encouraged to select another ANS faculty member as a career mentor. This person can provide guidance on career paths and internships.

You should not rely solely on Degree Navigator and perform “self advising”. Historically, students who operated strictly with Degree Navigator and do not work with an advisor have made critical errors that delayed graduation or they missed opportunities to enhance their programs. Further, these students may not become acquainted with the faculty and faculty may not become acquainted with these students. You may need a faculty/advisor recommendation for a job or graduate school. See your advisor regularly!

If you are not satisfied with the advisor to whom you were assigned, it is your option to select a new advisor. No explanation is required and nobody has hurt feelings. Remember, this is your academic program. If you change advisors, please inform Tracy Rich (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)).

All ANS students are encouraged to see their advisor at least once per semester to review their academic progress toward graduation and professional goals. Your advisor must also certify your completion of all requirements for graduation.

It is critical to keep your advisor and mentor informed about your actions and plans. Let him/her know if you are available for specialized independent educational and work experiences. Frequent short meetings are better than one long meeting. Remember, one of the most important people in your MSU undergraduate program of study is your advisor. Effective communication with your instructors and advisor will enhance your program of study, progress, and career after graduation.

Advisors for Baccalaureate Program

Advisors for Agricultural Technology

Staff

Research Faculty

Post-docs

Faculty

News

Internal Information

Departmental Contact Information

Normal business hours for the departmental office in room 1290 Anthony Hall are 8:00 am to noon and 1:00 to 5:00 pm, Monday through Friday.

  • Animal Science Directory
  • Chairperson:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), 1290F Anthony, 355-8384
  • Associate Chairperson:   .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), 1250A Anthony, 432-1816
  • Graduate Program Administrative Support:   .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), 1290G Anthony, 355-8417
  • Undergraduate Program Administrative Support.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), 1250 Anthony, 353-9227
  • Building Manager & Emergency Team Leader:   .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), 1230B Anthony, 355-1688
  • Laboratory Safety Officer:   .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), 2209E Anthony, 432-1392
  • RED Team Leader:   .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), 1230B Anthony, 355-1688
  • Computer Support:   .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), 3270E Anthony, 353-2921

Webmasters

  • Main:  Tracy Rich, 1250 Anthony, 353-9227, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
  • Graduate:  Kathy Tatro, 1290G Anthony, 355-8417, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
  • Youth:  Carla McLachlan, 1290C Anthony, 432-5402, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Animal Event Requirements

Contract Requirements for Events Involving the 
Use of Animals at Michigan State University Facilities

Preamble

Michigan State University recognizes and embraces the fundamental interdependence of humans and animals and is committed to the core value of humane care and use of all animals.

Animal-related activities are an integral part of MSU’s teaching, research and outreach missions and help MSU advance the quality of life for people and animals. Moreover, as a land-grant university, MSUregularly makes its facilities available to individuals and groups from outside the University community who wish to use these facilities for exhibitions, competitions, and other events involving animals. MSUtakes great pride in the excellent care and respect received by animals in its care and expects the same commitment to animal welfare from others using MSU’s facilities.

MSU is accredited by the Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care (AAALAC), a highly regarded independent reviewer of animal care programs. MSU faculty and staff implement humane care and management practices for animals in compliance with USDA regulations promulgated under the Animal Welfare Act, the Public Health Service Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, and the Guide for the Care and Use of Agricultural Animals in Agricultural Research and TeachingMSU has established an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) in accordance with USDAregulations, and MSU abides by the care and management practices approved by the IACUC.

Contract Requirements

For the reasons set forth in the Preamble, it is important that MSU establish baseline requirements to protect animals in events that take place at MSU when third parties contract for the use of MSUfacilities. When MSU makes its facilities available to third parties for events involving animals, one of its primary objectives will be to ensure that appropriate veterinary care is provided to those animals. Therefore, contracts for such events will provide that the individual or entity contracting with MSU for the use of its facilities must either have a veterinarian present at the event or have a written plan for appropriate and timely veterinary care during the event for any animal utilized at the event. Those who contract for the use of MSU facilities for events utilizing USDA-regulated animals will be required to furnish evidence of a USDA license(s), documentation of routine veterinary care, the name of the accompanying staff veterinarian or the USDA-required Program of Veterinary Care, and upon request,USDA Inspection Reports.

Contact:
   JR Haywood, Interim Assistant Vice President for Regulatory Affairs
   204 Olds Hall 
   Phone: 432-4500 
   Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 

Emergency and Safety

Emergency Evacuation

When the fire alarms sound, please evacuate the building immediately. Follow the directions of emergency team members in yellow hard hats, cross to the other side of the street and assemble at one of the two rally points located either:

  1. In the faculty/staff parking lot NORTH of the building, or
  2. EAST of Anthony Hall near the NORTHWEST corner of Farrall Hall.

DO NOT GATHER IN THE PARKING AREA IMMEDIATELY SOUTH OF ANTHONY HALL. IN THE EVENT OF A REAL EMERGENCY YOU COULD BECOME TRAPPED THERE. IF YOU FIND YOURSELF IN THIS AREA DURING AN EMERGENCY, GO AROUND THE SOUTH END OF ANTHONY HALL TO RALLY POINT B.

If you are personally aware of why the alarms sounded, please report the details of the incident to one of the emergency team members when you reach the rally point.

Do not re-enter Anthony Hall until the all clear is given by the East Lansing Fire Department or the MSU Department of Police & Public Safety. In the event of bad weather you will be directed by the emergency team to seek shelter in either the MSU International Center or in Farrall Hall.  

Laboratory Safety

Be Prepared Web Portal (MSU University Relations)

Office of Radiation, Chemical and Biological Safety (ORBCS)

Safety Resources for MSU Researchers (Office of VP for Research & Grad. Studies)

Forms and Links

    Computer Support
    Electronic Forms
    Emergency Procedures

Other Awards

MSU Dairy Farmer of the Year

Montcalm County farmer named 2015 MSU Dairy Farmer of the Year

Mike Rasmussen of Edmore, Michigan, is the Michigan State University Department of Animal Science‘s 2015 Dairy Farmer of the Year. For the full article, please follow this link:

http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/montcalm_county_farmer_named_2015_msu_dairy_farmer_of_the_year

The MSU Department of Animal Science has been recognizing outstanding Michigan dairy farmers since 1958, and the MSU Dairy Farmer of the Year Award is the highest honor bestowed by the department.

Staff Awards

Congratulations to Barb Sweeney

Barbara Sweeney, Office Assistant III in the Animal Science Department Office, is the recipient of the 2013 Gliozzo Clerical-Technical Recognition Award.  The award is presented annually to a clerical-technical support staff member selected from nominations received by the CT Recognition Award Selection Committee. The award is sponsored by the Thomas and Concettina Gliozzo Endowment Fund to recognize outstanding clerical-technical employees.  Charles Gliozzo is director emeritus of MSU‘s Study Abroad program. Thomas and Concettina Gliozzo were immigrants who became U.S. citizens and recognized the importance of education.

Selection criteria include respect and concern for all members of the campus community, diligence in daily work, significant contributions to the community or public service and innovative thinking.  Congratulations Barb!!

Congratulations to all our staff who were honored Monday, 4/22/13, for their years of dedication to MSU and this department!

Thank you for contributing to our success!

Randy Bontrager – 20 yrs of service

Doug Carmichael – 15 yrs of service

Jeff Greenlee – 35 yrs of service

Janet Ireland – 25 yrs of service

Carla McLachlan – 25 yrs of service

Angelo Napolitano – 35 yrs of service

Nancy Raney – 15 yrs of service

Ron Southwick – 20 yrs of service

Jamie Pratt (Retiree) - 29 yrs of service

Al Snedegar (Retiree) – 23 yrs of service

2013 Animal Science Outstanding Staff Award

Congratulations to Kim Dobson for being selected as the 2013 Animal Science Outstanding Staff member. 

2013 Institute of Agricultural Technology Outstanding Faculty/Staff Award

Congratulations to Paula Hitzler! Paula was nominated & selected by students for the 2013 Outstanding Faculty/Staff Award for the Institute of Agricultural Technology. Theresa Maine made the award presentation at yesterday’s Ag Tech graduation.

National Swine Registry honors Al Snedegar

Al Snedegar was recognized by the National Swine Registry (NSR) for his lifetime achievements and national and international contributions to the purebred swine industry. The award was given at the Pork Expo and was a surprise to Al. Al is also the subject of a feature article entitled “Al’s Kids: Teaching Lifetime Lessons While Talking Pigs”  in the June 2012 youth issue of the Seedstock Edgemagazine (pages 20-23) published by the NSR. It follows the life and career of our “Sned” and highlights the impacts he has had on youth and students. A copy will be in the front office if you would like to read the article. As you know Sned retired late spring and we will be holding a retirement picnic for him once the academic year begins.  Thank you Sned for all your dedication to students and great work at MSU and for the swine industry, congratulations!

CANR Outstanding Team Award

The team award is given to a team of staff that have worked above and beyond their assigned duties to accomplish a project or task important to the department, college and/or University.  With input and a letter of support from the University EBS project implementation staff, Jamie Pratt, Carolyn Adams, Barb Sweeney, Candace Ebbinghaus and Kim Dobson.

CANR Outstanding Individual Award Winners

Carolyn Adams won one of the Individual awards for her outstanding performance with pre-awards and assistance with the business of the department.

 

Jennifer Dominguez also won one of the Individual award for her outstanding work in the Meat Lab.  Jennifer is the Meat Lab Manager for the Departments of Animal Science and Food Science and Human Nutrition.

Faculty Awards

Karen Chou Recognized

Dr. Karen Chou received a letter of recognition from the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Medical Toxicology (published by the American College of Medical Toxicology) that her journal article “Phthalates in food and medical devices” is one of the top cited articles in the Journal. Karen was lead author with coauthor Robert Wright. Congratulations Karen!

Saddle and Sirloin Club Award

Dr. Dave Hawkins (retired ANS faculty emeritus) has been selected to have his portrait hung in the prestigious Saddle and Sirloin Club. This recognition is reserved for individuals who have demonstrated major impact and leadership to the livestock industry during his/her career. There are many outstanding individuals who are nominated yet never selected for this award. More than ½ of the awards have been made to faculty members of primarily Land Grant institutions. Dave will have his portrait painted and hung in the portrait gallery alongside ~ 350 honorees from previous years. The gallery now resides at the North American International Livestock Exposition headquarters in Louisville Kentucky. Dave will be inducted in November 2013 during the NAILE. Another MSU leader Dr. Harlan Richie (whose portrait you see on the back wall of room 1310) is also hanging in the NAILE gallery. Thank you Jason and others who worked hard to put this nomination together. Congratulations Dave!

Congratulations Janice Siegford

Dr. Janice Siegford has been selected as the 2013 CANR Established Teacher Award recipient. Janice will be recognized at the CANR spring commencement ceremony on Saturday May 4th at 7:30pm in the Breslin Center. Janice receives a $2,000 cash award along with $1,000 award for use in educational programs and professional development. A special adornment is also given to be worn on academic apparel in perpetuity as recognition of her achievement. Congratulations Janice!

Congratulations Juan Steibel

Congratulations to Dr. Juan Steibel who is the recipient of the prestigious Midwest Section/Branch Outstanding Young Animal/Dairy Scientist Award in Research. The award will be presented at the meetings of the Midwest Section ASAS/Midwest Branch ADSA in Des Moines March 11 to 13, 2013.   Please congratulate Juan on his accomplishment as this is a very competitive award and often has several highly qualified applicants in the pool.

Dr. Gretchen Hill Receives The Distinguished Service Award

Gretchen Hill was presented with the Distinguished Service Award at the Michigan Sheep Breeders Association annual banquet held during Shepherd’s Weekend. She was presented with a painting and cited for her service to the sheep industry and commitment to animal agriculture. Doug Uzelac, representing the MSBA, presented the award. Congratulations Gretchen!

MSU’s Dr. Camie R. Heleski wins 2012 AVMA Humane Award

(SAN DIEGO, Calif.) August 7, 2012— Camie R. Heleski, Ph.D., an alumni and faculty at Michigan State University (MSU), has received the American Veterinary Medical Association’s (AVMA) 2012 AVMA Humane Award.

The AVMA honored some of the nation’s top veterinarians during an awards ceremony at the association’s Annual Convention in San Diego, Calif. Each recipient has worked tirelessly to improve the lives of both animals and people around the country and the globe. These individuals represent the very best in all areas of veterinary medicine, from education and public service to research and private practice.

The AVMA Humane Award recognizes a non-veterinarian’s achievements in advancing the welfare of animals via leadership, public service, education, research/product development, and/or advocacy.

When Dr. Heleski began her Ph.D. in 2000, her main goal was to enhance her opportunities to be an advocate for equine welfare. Along the way, she and her major professor, Adroaldo Zanella, developed an initiative known as the Animal Welfare Judging and Assessment competition. The first competition was held in 2002 with 18 undergraduates; last year it had grown to 84 participants and boasts strong participation by veterinary students.

Over the last decade, Dr. Heleski has been actively involved in the International Society for Equitation Science, the mission of which is to promote and encourage the application of objective research and advanced practice which will ultimately improve the welfare of horses in their associations with humans. She was in charge of hosting their conference in 2007 at MSU, which was also the year they officially became a Society. For the past few years, she has been an active board member and currently serves as the procedural advisor.

Dr. Heleski has been the coordinator of the Two Year Horse Management program at MSU since 1992. Each year, that program accepts approximately 20 students. This teaching/advising role has kept her heavily integrated within the North American horse industry.

More recently, she was selected as the chair of the Scientific Committee for the National Farm Animal Care Council’s (NFACC) Equine Welfare Code, Canada, also serving as the liaison to the Industry Code Committee for NFACC.

Dr. Heleski’s research relates to horse behavior, horse welfare, horse-human interaction and understanding the role of working equids in developing countries.

For more information, please visit http://www.avma.org

Hoard’s Dairyman Youth Development Award Winner

Joe Domecq has been named the 2012 Hoard’s Dairyman Youth Development Award winner!  This awards recognizes someone who has had significant involvement in dairy-related youth activities either in a professional or volunteer capacity for a minimum of ten years.  They are highly regarded in the dairy industry for their role i personal development of dairy youth and for enhancing knowledge of and interest in the dairy industry.  Joe was recognized July 17th at the ADSA awards banquet at the Joint Annual Meeting in Phoenix.  A department reception was held after the awards banquet at the Hyatt Hotel.

 

Promotions & Reappointments
Congratulations to Drs. Cathy Ernst and Mike Orth who were promoted to the rank of Professor. Congratulations are also in order for Drs. Jason RowntreeAdam LockIk Kang and Santiago Utsumi who were successfully reappointed to assistant professor. Please take time to congratulate these faculties on their achievement!

Livestock-Climate Change Collaborative
“The Livestock-Climate Change Collaborative Research Support Program (LCC CRSP) at Colorado State University awarded more than $1.5 million (~$450,000 each) to four U.S. universities and their host-country partners in South Asia to improve the livelihoods of small-scale livestock producers in Nepal and the surrounding region. Nanda Joshi (PI), MSU Department of Animal Science, in partnership with Nepal Agricultural Research Council (NARC) received funding for a grant that improves feeding strategies for Buffalo. Buffalo are the important in Nepal contributing > 70% of milk and 65% of meat production. The research outcomes from this project will help local farmers better adapt to the impact of climate change by increasing buffalo milk and meat productivity through improved feeding strategies. The other universities receiving grants were: Utah State, Arizona State, and City University of New York.” Congratulations Nanda!

Student Awards

2012 MSU Collegiate Dairy Products Evaluation Teams

Michigan State University trained two teams to participate in the Regional and National Collegiate Dairy Products Evaluation Contests. Training in tandem with our MSU team were Aimee Wilson, Sarah Hobson, and Ruth Surgenor from Loughry College in Cookstown, Northern Ireland. At the Regional Contest on October , the MSU team of Haejun Seo, Cory Carson and Lisa Cezat placed 2nd in Milk thanks to strong judging by Haejun Seo (T-3rd) and Cory Carson (6th) and 7th of 11 teams in All-Products. The Loughry team was highlighted by Ruth Surgenor’s 3rd place finish in Milk with the team placing 9th. The students were able to participate in a tour of the pilot plants and research and development laboratories at the Kraft Technical Center in Glenview, IL, where the contest was held.

On November 3rd, sixteen teams showed up for the Collegiate Dairy Products Evaluation Contest in Springfield, MO. The contest was hosted by Dairy Concepts. Team MSU finished 5th in the Butter category and 12th in All-Products, while Team Loughry placed a respectable 8th place in All-Products. Once again, Ruth Surgenor received a 3rd place award, however, this one was in Milk and earned her a $50 check. The real highlight of the Contest was the 1st place team award for Ruth, Sarah and Aimee in the Butter category. Butter is the prestige category since it was the first product judged when the contest started ninety-one years ago. The traveling Butter Trophy will travel to Northern Ireland for a six month stay before returning to MSU before next year’s contest.

If anyone is interested in seeing what goes on at the Contest, more pictures may be viewed at the following link: http://share.shutterfly.com/share/received/welcome.sfly?fid=ca02a7a8252acd24&sid=2AZuGLFy4bM3KQ

Butter Champions 2012 (L to R): John Partridge, Coach; Ruth Surgenor, Sarah Hobson, Aimee Wilson (Loughry College Team); David Carpenter, VP CHR HANSEN; Missing: Josh Hall, Asst. Coach  

(L to R) MSU Team: Chelsea Gray, Haejun Seo, and Lisa Cezat; John Partridge, Coach; Loughry College Team: Ruth Surgenor, Sarah Hobson, and Aimee Wilson; Missing Josh Hall, Asst. Coach

MSU Meat Judging Team

The MSU Meat Judging Team finished their season at the International Intercollegiate Meat Evaluation Contest in Dakota City, Nebraska on November 25. Team members included Lane Carpenter (Charlotte, MI), Julie Feldpausch (Hastings, MI), Audrey Ing (Milan, MI), Kelsey Steketee (Caledonia, MI), and alternates were Emily Mitchell (Hudsonville, MI), Molly O’Brien (Flushing, MI), Patrick Owens (Midland, MI), and Andrew Weaver (Midland, MI).

Individually, Kelsey Steketee was 1st in Pork Judging, tied for 5th in Specifications, 7th in Reasons, and ranked 9th Overall. Audrey Ing tied for 6th in Placings and Lane Carpenter tied for 10th in Beef Grading. In the Alternate division, Molly O’Brien was 7th Overall. In the team competition MSU ranked 2nd in Lamb Judging, 4th in Pork Judging, 4th in Placings, and 6th in Beef Grading. Overall, the team ranked 4th out of 16 teams, which is the most successful a MSU Meat Judging team has been since 1985.

Our success would not have been possible without the support from the MSU meat laboratory management, Jennifer Dominguez and Ryan Varner. Also, financial support from the Michigan Meat Association, Michigan Pork Producers Association, Michigan Cattleman’s Association, Michigan Sheep Breeders Association, MSU Block & Bridle Club, Meijer, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, and Department of Animal Science made it possible for us to travel to practices and competitions. We also appreciate the many meat processors who have allowed us to come in to practice, Bellingar Packing, Byron Center Meats, Little Town Jerky Company, McNees Meats, Fillmore Beef, Bernthal Packing, JBS Packerland - Plainwell, Wolverine Packing, Tyson Fresh Meats in Joslin, IL, as well as Cargill Meat Solutions in both Amarillo, Texas and Schuyler, Nebraska.

MSU Livestock Judging Team

The Livestock Judging team was 6th high team overall out of 27 teams at the American Royal. The team was 3rd in cattle, 6th in sheep, 8th in reasons. Katie Cook was 7th in cattle and Sarah Kennedy was 6th in sheep, 11th in cattle, 14th in reasons, and 12th overall.  This is the highest ranking MSU has had at a National contest in 6 years.  We were the highest ranking school east of the Mississippi river and the only team in the top 10 that judged all 4 year in house kids from the same state.

MSU Horse Judging Team

Congratulation is in order for the MSU Horse Judging team on their strong showings at their 2 annual competitions.

At the All-American Quarter Horse Congress in Columbus, OH the team was 9th Overall out of 22 Senior Teams.  They were 10th in halter, 8th in performance and 10th in reasons.  Additionally, Kerri Rozeboom was 6th high individual in performance.

At the US Arabian/Half-Arabian Nationals in Tulsa, OK the team finished out their season with an impressive 2nd place finish out of 10 Senior teams.  The team was 2nd in Halter, 2nd in Performance, and 2nd Reasons.  There were many individual placings as well.  In the overall category, Theresa Maine was 4th high individual, Michelle Pineau was 8th high individual, Kerri Rozeboom was 9th high individual, and Mallory Burcz was 10th high individual.

2012 Team members were: Mallory Burcz, Theresa Maine, KC Main, Kerri Rozeboom, Taryn Schairer, Michelle Pineau, Kate Koroleski, JC Schweda, and Danni Dombrowski.

MSU Hunt Seat Equestrian Team

On October 13th, the MSU Hunt Seat team were stars at their meet!  The meet was hosted by Western Michigan University.  The team was High Point Team overall team by an impressive 13 points! Additionally, Brittany Hess won High Point Rider overall.  Congratulations!

The MSU Hunt Seat Equestrian team competed over the weekend and once again took home the title of High Point Team!  MSUET rider, Aleena Bobich, was crowned Reserve High Point Rider.  Congrats to all!

Top honors for the Michigan 4-H Dairy Judging Team

The Michigan 4-H Dairy Judging Team coached by Dr. Joe Domecq, MSU Department of Animal Science and Ms. Sarah Black, 4-H volunteer,  took top honors at the National 4-H Dairy Judging Contest held in Madison, WI during the World Dairy Expo.  The team took first place in both the dairy judging and the oral reasons divisions.  Team members included MSU Students Megan Bush, Hayleigh Geurink and Savannah Katulski as well as Alma College student Megan Filhart.

 

“I can’t say enough about the level of commitment and dedication the members of this team made in preparation for the national contest,” Domecq said. “In addition, the program is fortunate to have a large number of volunteers and judging team alumni who are willing to volunteer numerous hours to help train and mentor the youth over the course of the practice season. The entire experience is about more than practicing for a contest – it’s about continuing to build the dairy judging program and helping these young people develop the skills necessary to succeed in life.”

MSU Judging Team

In early October, the team traveled to Wyalusing, PA and competed in the Eastern National. The team placed 6th in Beef Grading 8th overall. Kelsey Steketee was 5th in Placings and Julie Feldpausch tied for 7th in placings. Audrey Ing in was 9th in Specifications. In the Alternate division, Andrew Weaver was 5th and Emily Mitchell was 9th overall.

The MSU Meat Judging Team recently traveled to Omaha Nebraska for the American Royal Intercollegiate Meat Judging Competition. Along the way, we practiced at Meat Plant in Joslin, IL and Schuyler, NE. We also had the opportunity to practice in the Meat Laboratory at University of Nebraska – Lincoln. On Sunday, the contest started at 6am in Nebraska Beef where 93 students from 15 different schools were represented in the Senior division. Michigan State University was recognized with 2nd in placings, 4th in pork judging, and 7th overall. Individually, team member Audrey Ing was recognized for 2nd in placings, 3rd in pork judging, and 7th overall. In the Alternates division, Lane Carpenter received 5th, Emily Mitchell was 9th, and Molly O’Brien was 10th. The team is excited to travel to Texas for the High Plains contest and as always, greatly appreciates the support of our stakeholders and MSU.

We have received excellent financial support from the Michigan Meat Association, Michigan Pork Producers Association, Michigan Cattleman’s Association, Michigan Sheep Breeders Association, MSU Block & Bridle Club, Meijer, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, and Department of Animal Science. We also appreciate the many meat processors who have allowed us to come in to practice, Bellingar Packing, Byron Center Meats, Little Town Jerky Company, McNees Meats, Fillmore Beef, Bernthal Packing JBS Packerland - Plainwell, Wolverine Packing, Tyson Fresh Meats in Joslin, IL and Cargill Meat Solutions in Schuyler, Nebraska.

Thank you all for your great support!

Sarah Wells

Student receives 1st Place at Annual Meetings

Sarah Schmidt received 1st Place in the ADSA-SAD Undergraduate Original Research Division. Her abstract was:  Schmidt, S., C. L. Preseault, J. E. Rico, M. S. Allen, and A. L. Lock. 2012.

Incorporation of palmitic and stearic acids into plasma lipid fractions of lactating dairy cows. American Dairy Science Association Annual Meeting (submitted).

 

Congratulations Sarah, Great Job!!!

MSU Arabian Breeding Program

In the most widely circulated Arabian Horse Magazine “The Arabian Horse World”, the Michigan State University Arabian breeding program was recognized this year as the 2nd  leading breeder of top ten and national champion Sport Horses and the 7th leading breeder of total top ten and nation champions over both shows.  This is the first time that MSU has been recognized in this manner.  The best part of this recognition is that itis mostly a result of MSU students competing on MSU horses while enrolled in the summer training and show class (ANS 146) taught by Paula Hitzler. 

Students Do Well at Tri State Meeting

MSU Animal Science had 2 graduate and 3 undergraduate students compete in competitions; Kelsey DeLand, Sarah Schmidt, and Matt Kuhn in the undergrad, and Jackie Ploetz and Jessie Shire in the graduate.

Kelsey DeLand won the undergrad competition (3 students from each Uni competing). Her presentation was research that she has done in Dr. Adam Lock’s lab with Dave Beede which she is presenting at ADSA this summer. Matt came third with a lit review presentation.  There were 12 people in the grad competition. Jackie Ploetz (PhD student in Dr. Lock’s) won this competition. 

MSU takes 3rd place in the North American Intercollegiate Dairy Challenge

On March 28 - April1, 2012, Animal Science seniors Eric Sneller, Carrie Szybisty, Arianna Walters and Torey Wood (double major in biosystems engineering) participated in the North American Intercollegiate Dairy Challenge (NAIDC) in Roanoke, Virginia.The team took 3rd in a close placing in their division, with 6 points out of100 separating the top 3 teams. Ashleigh Covert, Animal Science senior,participated with students from University of Florida and Penn State on an aggregate team that placed 5th in their division. In addition, our students received many positive comments on their teamwork and professionalism.

During the trip to Virginia, the students visited the campus of Virginia Tech and its dairy farm. They also toured the heifer-raising operation owned by Dr. Don Gardner, a founding member of the Dairy Calf and Heifer Association. At the event, Ashleigh was informed she was selected as a summer Farm Management Intern at the Miner Institute in New York.

Congratulations to our students on their achievements! Michigan State will partner with Ohio State and Purdue to co-host the NAIDC in Fort Wayne in 2013 and 2014.

MSU Meat Judging Team Travels to the Southeastern Intercollegiate Meat Judging Contest

On April 13-14, 2012 the MSU Meat Judging Team sent 13 members to the Southeastern Intercollegiate Livestock Contest where the MSU White Team took 4thoverall and the MSU Green Team took 8th of the 15 teams competing.There were 13 team members in attendance from MSU. The White team, which consisted of Kelsey Steketee, Andrew Weaver, Julie Feldpausch, and Patrick Owens also placed 1st in lamb judging, 3rd in beef judging, 5th in pork judging, 3rd in specifications, 2ndin placings, and 4th in reasons. The MSU Green team which consisted of Audrey Ing, Katie Sollman, Molly O’Brien, and Emily Mitchell placed 5thin beef grading and 3rd in reasons. The MSU Alternate team ranked 4thin Lamb judging, although they were not eligible for team awards. However,alternate team members Lane Carpernter, Amanda Schultz, Shane Adams, Diondra Voishich, and Lachelle Devoe were eligible for team awards and represented MSU very well!

 

In the individual competition, MSU took 2nd (Weaver), 5th (Ing), and 10th (Steketee) place overall in the competition. In beef judging teammates tied for 5th (O’Brien) and 6th (Feldpausch). In lamb judgingMSU took 1st (Feldpausch), 2nd (tied for 1st - Ing), 4th (Owens), 5th (O’Brien), and tied with O’Brien but ranking 6th (Schultz). Weaver was tied for first but ranked 2nd in specifications. In placings,Carpenter took 1st with 493out of 500 points. And lastly, in reasons team members Feldpausch and O’Brien tied taking 1st and 2nd in reasons overall with Amanda Schultz in 7th.

 

During this trip we also had the opportunity to visit the Ohio State meat lab, the University of Kentucky meat lab and took the time between the contest and the banquet to briefly visit horse races and see another side of Animal Science.Thank you to everyone in the department for your great support!

 

MSU Equestrian Hunt Seat Team

 

The Michigan State Equestrian Hunt Seat Team traveled to Morehead, Kentucky the first weekend of April for Hunt Seat Zones. We had two riders qualify to show.Junior, Erin Turner, rode in Intermediate Fences, and sophomore, Brittany Hess,rode in Intermediate on the flat. Erin Turner was reserve champion in her fences class and qualified for Nationals in North Carolina, and Brittany took 9th place in her flat class. This is the 4th year in a row that the Hunt Team has had a rider qualify for Nationals. Congratulations girls!

 

MSU ANS Alumni News - Iowa State’s Sterle Named Second Recipient of Harman Professorship

 

Jodi Sterle has been named the second recipient of the Eldred and Donna Harman Professorship for Excellence in Teaching and Learning in Iowa State University’s Department of Animal Science.

 

The endowed position was established by Eldred and Donna Harman of Waterloo in 2010. Eldred Harman is a 1947 Iowa State University animal science graduate and a retired vice president of American Federal Savings.

 

Sterle is an associate professor of animal science and joined the faculty in 2011. She had been an associate professor and extension swine specialist at Texas A&M University. She earned a bachelor’s degree in animal science from Michigan State University, and earned her master’s and doctorate degrees in swine reproductive management from the University of Missouri.

 

Sterle will be taking over the responsibilities as the department’s undergraduate program coordinator from Doug Kenealy, a university professor of animal science. Kenealy is retiring this spring after 37 years on the faculty. He was the first recipient of the Eldred and Donna Harman Professorship for Excellence in Teaching and Learning.

 

Sterle, who will be taking over Kenealy’s advising and curriculum duties,plans to continue to enhance the teaching program that put Iowa State at the top of the list for students, employers and industry representatives.

 

Sterle teaches introductory animal science classes and this fall will be introducing a new course she developed. The course, The Art and Heritage of Livestock, reviews the role of animals in the development of culture throughout the world.

 

MSU Livestock Judging Team

 

The MSU Livestock judging team competed at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo Judging Contest in Houston TX.  The team was 12th high team overall.  The team placed 7th in the Reasons Division, 8th in the Swine Division, 10th in the Sheep division.  The following team members placed in the top 5 of the respective divisions.

 

Beth Oliver was 2nd high individual in the Swine Division

 

Katie Cook was 2nd high individual in the Reasons Division

 

These young ladies being in the top 2 of these divisions at a major national contest in a very big accomplishment.

 

The team members are: Hannah Bollinger, Katie Cook, Taylor Harrison, Ali Harwell,Sarah Kennedy, Beth Oliver, Beth Wernette, Jonathon Stelter.

 

Kudos

 

A former student Ethan Bosserd, was featured in a cover story. One of his quotes was directed to the experience he had on the livestock judging team,  “My degree along with my experience on the MSU Livestock Judging Team, really opened the door for this job.  My three coaches, Sankey, Culham and Snedegar have been great influential people and amazing teachers”.  The article includes other students with experiences on our judging teams: Tera Koebel (Dairy Team) and Sarah Campbell (Livestock Team).  Also featured is information pulled from the data collected by Gretchen Hill in ANS 110 about the changing demographics of our Animal Science students.  Very nice exposure of our program.

 

MSU Purebred Beef Center Travels To National Western Stock Show

 

The MSU Purebred Beef Cow/calf Center had another very successful trip to the National Western Stock Show in Denver, Colorado.  Cody Sankey, manager; Ken Geuns, faculty coordinator; and four students represented the center at the event. The National Western Stock Show is the premier cattle event and competition in the world and has visitors from around the globe.

 

The students included: Scott Hartsell, Agribusiness Management senior from Cassopolis; Jed Kruger, Animal Science junior from Ionia; Charlie Cramer, Crop & Soil Science senior from Stanwood; and T.J. Murphy, Ag Industries junior from Marne.  They put in several very long days preparing the cattle for the shows and sales and represented the center extremely well.  It is also important to mention the outstanding effort of the students that stayed at home to do chores, calve cows, and make sure that everything was going well at the Beef Barn. 

 

MSU consigned four bulls in the Angus and Hereford breed association sponsored sales. These cattle sold to breeders representing programs in Minnesota, Kansas,Nebraska, and Michigan for a total of $15,100.00 to average $3775.00. 

 

In addition, MSU exhibited six females in the Angus and Hereford shows.  Highlights in the Angus show include, MSU Elba 115, a January 2011 female placing third in class.  This female was purchased fromMSU in the Angus Connection Sale last fall for $10,000.00 by Sydney Schnoor of Chowchilla, California. Highlights in the Hereford show include, MSU Rachael 16Y, a February 2011female being selected as a class winner.  This female was purchased from MSU in the Fall Fest sale for $8000.00 by Danielle Starr of Manawa,Wisconsin. 

 

It is also important to note that the progeny of MSU Keepsake 14S, a female that was produced byMSU in 2006, produced two division champion bulls in the Hereford show.  14S was purchased by Larry Crane of Mitchell, S. Dakota in the 2006Fall Fest sale.  This female went on to be named the 2008 National Western Reserve Champion Polled Hereford Female.  One son, LCX Unleashed Keepsake1110 ET, a March 2011 bull, was named Polled Hereford Spring Bull Calf Champion.  Another son, LCX He’s A Truck 104 ET, a February 2010 bull, was named Horned Hereford Yearling Bull Champion.   

 

Most importantly, it is the people that matter.  The student employees of the MSU Purebred Beef Cattle Center are to be highly commended for their commitment and work ethic.  Many of them gave up a significant portion of their break between the two semesters and the holidays to insure that everything was ready for this show.  We are extremely proud of them.

 

2012National Western

 

MSU Livestock Judging Team

 

The MSU 2012 Livestock Judging Team made a successful trip to Denver, Colorado,finishing 14th out of 28 teams overall, 8th in beef, and10th in swine.  Hannah Bollinger of Coopersville was 11th in swine, 21st in market steers, 27th in beef, and 30th in beef reasons.  Sarah Kennedy of Saranac, was 13th in goats/sheep, and 24th in swine. Beth Oliver of Bryron, was 17th in beef, and 24th in beef reasons. Jonathon Shelter of Bridgeman,was 25th in beef.  Taylor Harrison of Coldwater was also a team member. 

 

The team also competed in National Western Carload Contest where they finished 6thout of 28 teams.  Beth Wernette of Remus was the 25th Individual in this event. The other team members were Allison Harwell of Coldwater, Katie Cook, of Goodrich, Sarah Kennedy, and Jonathon Shelter.

 

The team practiced at Kansas State University and Colorado State University, as well as several other stops on their way to Denver. Also on the trip was Chris Strong of Portland, and Ethan Bossard of Marshall, from last years team and Coach Al Snedegar. Cody Sankey and Al Culham are also coaches of the team. They are the only Major college team without experienced Junior College transfers and this was the first official contest for them.

 

Horsemen’s Weekend

 

The MSU Horsemen’s Association completed a very successful Horsemen’s Weekend, January 13-15 at the MSU Pavilion.  This weekend attracted roughly 500spectators and brought the various member clubs, including Dressage, Horse Judging Team, Polo, Rodeo, and Equestrian Team, together as Horsemen’s members to become better acquainted and to accomplish something as a group. The event also served as an excellent recruiting effort.  On Sunday, the MSU Stock Seat Equestrian Team overtook GVSU to win the Regional Championship by one point!  A special thank you to all AND Department faculty who supported the event by conducting clinics or providing horses, including Dr. Shelle, Paula Hitzler, Karen Waite, Camie Heleski and Taylor Fabus.

 

Animal Science AQ Team

 

The winner of the 2012 MSU Animal Science AQ is Team A+ Producers!  The members of this team are Caroline Ylioja, Julie Feldpausch, Jenna Falor and Rebecca Dow.  It was a tough competition this year, with all teams performing well.  The A+ Producers team will be representing MSU at the2012 Midwest Regional AQ in Iowa, March 18-19.

 

A huge Thank You! goes to the section leaders of the events, Dr. Joe Domecq, Dr.Brian Nielsen and Dr. Roy Fogwell, the Block and Bridle AQ Chair Julie Feldpausch as well as all the faculty, staff and graduate students who helped make this very busy event a success. Without the hard work and dedication of our faculty,staff, graduate students and even their families we would not be able to put on this event for our undergraduate students.

 

Thank you also to the teams that participated and I hope that you enjoyed this friendly competition with your fellow students. Any ideas that you may have for improving future events are welcome!

 

Good News from the 92nd Block& Bridle National Convention!

 

Fifteen members of the Michigan State University Block & Bridle (B&B) club along with one advisor traveled down to Murfreesboro, TN to attend the National Convention, held in conjunction with the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) Convention in Nashville. The convention took place from January 31 until February 3. Some of the highlights included tours of Tennessee agriculture(with some pretty good weather!), great speakers at Cattlemen’s College, and country music at the Grand Ole Opry. At the closing banquet, the MSU B&B club was recognized publicly by the host school, Middle Tennessee State University, for their efforts in helping them prepare for and fund this convention. Additionally, Joel Sparks, last year’s club president and current veterinary student at Iowa State University, won 2nd place for the outstanding senior award. Dr. Michael Orth, one of the club’s three advisors,was elected to an eight-year term to serve as a National Block & Bridle officer. He will serve a four-year term as Secretary/Treasurer, two-year term as Vice President, and two-year term as President. He is only the second MSU Animal Science faculty member (Dave Hawkins is the other) to serve in this capacity in the club’s history.

 

MSU Livestock Judging Team

 

The MSU Livestock judging team competed at the Dixie National Beef Cattle Contest in Jackson, MS.  The team was 5th high team overall.  The team placed 5th in the British Breeds Division, 5th in the Brahman Breeds Division, 4th in the Market Cattle division, and5th in oral reasons.  The following team members placed in the top 5 of the respective divisions.

 

Beth Oliver was 2nd high individual in the English Division

 

Hannah Bollinger was 4th high individual in the English Division

 

Sarah Kennedy was 5th high individual in the Continental Division

 

Beth Wernette was 5th high individual in the Brahman Division

 

The team members are: Hannah Bollinger, Katie Cook, Taylor Harrison, Ali Harwell,Sarah Kennedy, Beth Oliver, Beth Wernette, Jonathon Stelter.

 

2012 ASAS Young Scholars

 

Congratulations to Dr. Rodrigo Manjarin (mentored by Nathalie Trottier) and Dr. Igseo Choi (mentored by Cathy Ernst) who were named 2012 ASAS Young Scholars.  They will be recognized at the Midwest Annual Meeting in Des Moines, March 19-21, 2012. 

ANS Standing Committees

Animal Science
2014-15
Standing Committees

Department Advisory Committee (DAC)
Dan Buskirk, Chair
Juan Pedro Steibel
Dale Rozeboom
Miriam Weber Nielsen
George Smith
John Shelle (Ex-officio)
Janice Swanson (Ex-officio)

Undergraduate Student Affairs & Curriculum Committee (USACC)
Camie Heleski (2015)
Elizabeth Karcher (2017)
  David Beede (2017)
John Shelle (Ex-officio)

Graduate Student Affairs & Curriculum Committee (GSACC)
Steve Bursian (Ex-officio)
Mike Allen
Janice Siegford
Cathy Ernst

Kathy Tatro (Grad Program Administrator)

CANR Promotion & Tenure Committee (CANR P&T)
Richad Pursley (2014)

Welcome

Welcome to Michigan State University - Animal Science

I am pleased to serve as the Chair of the Department of Animal Science at Michigan State University. As you look through our web pages, you will see lots of exciting opportunities that hopefully meet your needs. 

If you are a prospective student, we have tremendous opportunities in our animal industry, animal biology and pre-veterinary medicine, companion and exotic animal biology, and production animal scholars concentrations, or our Ag Tech options in beefdairyhorse, and swine.  Our courses provide you with a strong science background and lots of opportunities to work with animals. Take a virtual tour of our on-campus farms as well as our off campus facilities. There are numerous clubs you can join such as the Block and Bridle Club or the Animal Welfare team, and you can participate in international experiences or internships.  So feel free to “look around” our website and then stop by or call us and we can arrange a tour for you.

If you are interested in graduate school or research, we have many opportunities for both applied research or basic biomedical science.   We have researchers working in reproductive and developmental biology, animal health and welfare, nutrient management, genomics, bioinformatics, and bone and joint health in beef cattle, swine, poultry and dairy animals.  For an overview visit our research programs section to learn more about each of the programs or fill out an application for graduate school.

If you own animals and need our help we have experts in many different areas or can help you find someone to help you.  Our Extension Areas of Expertise teams can help you in many aspects of Animal Management.  If you are under 21, we have lots of animal opportunities for you.

The Department of Animal Science is committed to providing you with a quality experience.  Below is a listing of our Mission, Vision & Values.

If you have any questions or comments or would like additional information, we would be happy to help you.  Just e-mail us at:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).  Departmental Chair Bulletins are available to find out information about Animal Science.

Mission: Advance agriculture using multidisciplinary approaches to generate, teach, disseminate and apply knowledge in animal biology and management.

Vision: Our scholarship encompasses innovative research, development of successful graduates, and engagement of stakeholders to integrate and apply relevant knowledge.

Values:

We value the land-grant mission upon which Michigan State University was founded.

We value environmental, economic and social sustainability of agricultural systems.

We value innovative programs that integrate teaching, research and extension.

We value equally the scholarly contributions of teaching, research and extension.

We value a balanced commitment to teaching, research and extension.

We value communication and partnerships with our agricultural stakeholders and the broader community.

We value external and internal peer review.

We value accountability to our stakeholders.

We value accessibility of agricultural animals for experiential learning and research.

We value a collegial atmosphere that contributes to the personal well-being and professional development of faculty, staff and students.

Adopted December 19, 2002

Department of Animal Science By Laws (May, 2013)

Janice C. Swanson, Ph.D.
Chair
Professor and Director of Animal Welfare
Department of Animal Science
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824

 

 

Registration

Register before April 20, 2012 to receive the $300 early bird rate. Take advantage of one of the four optional tours to see how border management, on farm composting and rendering are being handled in new and innovative ways. Tours are an additional $30.  For those who are unable to attend the full conference, daily registration options are available.

Register online here! 

 

 

Early Registration (by April 20, 2012)

$300

Regular Registration (on and after April 21, 2012)

$375

Optional Monday Tours

$30 (select one tour)

Monday Only

$50

Tuesday Only

$150

Wednesday Only

$150

Thursday Only

$150

Thursday Demonstration Only

$50

 Partner Tours

Experience Little Bavaria (full day)

$55

Greenfield Village and Henry Ford Museum and Fords’ Rouge Plant Tour

$75

Gardens Galore (half day)

$40

Schedule

Download a PDF Version of the Schedule here!  (Tentative)

 

May 21, 2012

7:00 a.m.

Registration Open for Symposium Participants

7:00 a.m.

Tours Depart Doubletree Hotel

Tour Requirements:

International participants and domestic participants who have traveled internationally must not have been in contact with any livestock within 7 days of this tour. Domestic participants may not tour if having visited Plum Island in the past 7 days. All other domestic participants must not have been in contact with any livestock with 2 days of the tour. Participants must wear long pants and closed toed shoes for all tours. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) will be provided when needed.

A Trip Across The Border – Animal Inspection Procedures and Routine Mortality Disposal Methods

Features visits to Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Animal Inspection Facility, Reid Dairy Farm, USDA-APHIS inspection facility, and Pine Tree Acres Landfill. Participants will visit with personnel about procedures for live animal inspections moving internationally, observe routine animal management as it relates to mortality management, and view various disposal methods such as a composting, incineration, arrangements with landfills and on farm burial. In addition participants will learn how farms and landfills facilitate successful disposal.

 

This tour may require early departure due to border crossing. This is an international trip; passports are required to board the bus. If you do not have your passport you will be unable to attend this tour and no refund will be given

 

Obtaining Value-Added Products from Animal Rendering and Managing On-Farm Mortality Effectively

Features visits to Darling International, a hog farm, two dairy farms, one featuring composting and the other an incinerator. Participants will learn about the rendering process and how value added products are obtained and can serve Michigan’s livestock industry. Learn how one company is finding ways to create new products with environmentally friendly techniques to reduce their overall environmental impact. In addition participants will observe routine animal management as it relates to mortality management, and view various disposal methods such as a composting, incineration, arrangements with landfills and on farm burial.

Capturing Energy in Mortalities, Disease Diagnostics, Emergency Planning and

On-Farm Mortality Management

Participants will have an opportunity to learn about the future potential of disposing of or capturing energy from animal tissue by products and carcass reduction at Michigan State University Anaerobic Digestion Research and Education Center. Then learn about disease surveillance and identification, routine incineration of carcasses, diagnostic services by the nationally renowned Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health. Talk with officials about the state’s mass carcass emergency management plan and observe routine animal management as it relates to mortality management, and view mortality composting on a beef and swine farm.

Managing Food Chains  Waste and On-Farm Mortality Management

Features a sheep and veal slaughter facility that also distributes meat and fish. Participants will learn how the facility to properly manage and dispose of unsellable or outdated food of animal origin and managing carcass byproducts. The tour also features a visit to an Ohio 1500-acre farm which is a EPA Class 2 composting site taking food wastes of animal origin and composting with leaves and manure growing-finishing operations which composts mortalities on-farm.

4 p.m.

Registration open

5 p.m.

Tours Return to Doubletree Hotel

6 p.m.

Reception and Exhibitor Showcase

Welcome to Michigan: Dr. Dale Rozeboom, Professor and Extension Specialist, Michigan State University

Greetings from Canada: Dr. Jim E Clark, DVM, National Manager - Disease Control, Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Opening Comments: Dr. Tammy Beckham, Director, The National Center for Foreign Animal and Zoonotic Disease Defense (FAZD Center)

May 22, 2011

7:30 a.m.

Registration open, Breakfast Available, Exhibitor Showcase

8:15 a.m.

Welcome: Mr. Keith Creagh, Director, Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development

8:30 a.m.

Keynote Address:  Research, Regulations and Response

Dr. Donald Klingborg, US Davis Cooperative Extension will discuss how research, regulations and response need to be connected and integrated. He will address how researchers can help move research based information to change in local, state, national and internationally policy. Learn the value of collaboration and consensus among local and regional planners and most importantly learn how to involve the international community in the development of research and policy to ensure the best regulations and response around the world.

9:15 a.m.

Plenary Session: One Health:  Understanding the Connection between Human and Animal Health, Mr. Gary Flory, Agricultural & Water Compliance Manager, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, will relate emergency management, mass carcass disposal, disease threats, and routine dead animal management to the One Health Initiative which seeks stronger collaborations and communications in all aspects of health care for humans, animals and the environment.

10 a.m.

Break and Exhibitor Showcase

10:30 a.m.

Breakout Sessions

Session 1: Emergency Response and Policy

Moderators: Tom Glanville and Mary Schwarz

·     Disease Response by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency During Winter

o   Edward Malek, Canadian Food Inspection Agency

·         Decision Support for Disposal of Animal Carcasses and Waste Materials in a Foot and Mouth Disease Outbreak – The New Zealand Approach to Decision Making

o   Brendan Pollard, New Zealand Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry

·     Statutory Regulation of Dead Animals Carcass Disposal in Nigeria

o   Anselm Ego Onimonyi, University of Nigeria Nsukka

·     Current Status of HPAI in Vietnam: Information Program for the Livestock and Poultry Industries

o   Van Dang Ky, Epidemiology Division, Department of Animal Health, Vietnam

Session 2: Alternative/Mechanical Disposal

Moderators: Bill Seekins and Keith Matassa

  • Update on Status of Transportable Gasifier for On-Farm Disposal of Animal Mortalities
    • Paul Lemieux, US Environmental Protection Agency
  • In-Vessel Bioreduction Provides an Effective Storage and Pre-Treatment Method for Livestock Carcasses Prior to Final Disposal
    • Prysor Williams, Bangor University
  • Energy Flows During Gasification of Specified Risk Materials Compost
    • Gordon Price, Nova Scotia Agricultural College
  • Biodrying (Composting) of Animal Slaughterhouse Residues
    • Yves Bernard

12:30 p.m.

Lunch

1:15 p.m.

Poster Review and Exhibitor Showcase

2:00 p.m.

Plenary Presentation

Decontamination and Disposal Following Food and Agricultural Emergencies: EPA’s Perspective on FSMA Section 208

Juan Reyes, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

2:30 p.m.

Breakout  Sessions

Session 3: Environmental Effects of Disposal

Moderators: Craig Williams and Josh Payne

·         Leachate Movement Beneath Two Carcass Burial Sites

o   Dyan Pratt, University of Saskatchewan

·         Using Novel Taxonomic Profiling Techniques to Evaluate Microbial Communities in Soil Beneath a Mortalities Burial Site

o   Dyan Pratt, University of Saskatchewan

·         Large Animal Carcass Mortality Composting: Impact on Soil Nutrients

o   Mark Hutchinson, University of Maine

·         Fate of Barbiturates and Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs During Carcass Composting

o   Mary Schwarz, Cornell Waste Management Institute

·         Air Emissions from In-Vessel Rotating Drum and Open Static Pile Composting of Swine Carcasses, Whole and Ground

o   Dale Rozeboom, Michigan State University

Session 4: Disposal, Depopulation, Decontamination/Disinfection and Recovery

Moderators: Melissa Berquist and Edward Malek

·         Mass Depopulation of Laying Hens in Whole Barns with Liquid Carbon Dioxide: Evaluation of Welfare Impact

o   Patricia Turner, University of Guelph

·         Field Study to Examine Restoration of a Rendering Facility Back to Normal Operation Following its use for Disposal: Rendering in an FAD Response

o   Paul Lemieux, US Environmental Protection Agency

·         Reading the Fine Print – A User’s Guide to Understanding Disinfectants

o   Nicole Kenny, Virox Technologies Inc

·         EPA’s Role in Radiological Releases and Agricultural Waste Management Activities

o   Paul Kudarauskas, USEPA Office of Emergency Management

5:00 p.m.

Poster Presentations

·        Field Testing of Bone Screening and Beneficial Reuse of Large Animal Mortality Compost by Robert Clark

·        Serological Investigation of Salmonellosis in Some Wild Birds and Human Contacts by Amr Hashem

·        A Comparison of The Quantity and Quality of Leachate Generated by Compost Piles Exposed to Natural and Artificially Induced Precipitation by Mark King

·        Small Scale Composting at the UNE Marine Animal Rehabilitation Center Compost Facility by Keith Matassa

·        Online Mortality Certification Course by Amanda Meddles

·        Biosecurity messaging: What do the recipients of our messages think? by Dale Moore

·        A Literature Review on Disinfecting Chemicals for Improved Bio-Security of Emergency Animal Mortality Composting and Anaerobic Digestion by Lam Nguyen

·        Static Composting of Equine Mortality by C.A. Shea Porr

·        Training First Responders on Equine Handling and Technical Rescue by C.A. Shea Porr

·        Behavior of Microbial Communities Beneath a Mortalities Burial Site using CPN-60 Taxonomic Profiling by Dyan Pratt

·        Economic Costs of In-vessel and Open Static Pile Systems for Routine Mortality Management on Swine Farms by Dale Rozeboom

·        Disposal Planning with Landfills by Anna Ruman

·        United States Dead Animal Disposal Laws by Mary Schwarz

6:30 p.m.

Dinner on your own

May 23, 2011

7:30 a.m.

Registration open, Breakfast Available, Exhibitor Showcase

8:30 a.m.

Keynote Address: 2010 FMD Outbreak in Korea-Government’s Response to this Emergency and Important Lessons Learned

Dr. Heekwon Ahn, Animal Environment Division, National Institute of Animal Science Rural Development Administration Republic of Korea will discuss Korea’s response to this emergency, and important the lessons learned that would be most helpful to other countries around the world should they face a similar situation.  Dr. Ahn is now one of Korea’s leading researchers evaluating the environmental impacts of emergency disposal techniques employed late last year, and improved disposal technologies for handling future disease outbreaks.

9:15 a.m.

Plenary Session: PBB’s Continuing Impact on Michigan

In the 1970’s the citizens of Michigan experienced the contamination of their food system with polybrominated biphenyls (pbb’s). A PBB-based flame retardant was accidently mixed into animal feeds.  The history of this event will be shared with a focus on emergency response, animal mortality management, the impact on human health, the long-term impact on public policy and emergency planning. The presentation will be by a team of individuals, many of which lived through this historical event and other who have had a role in managing its enduring effect on Michigan.

10 a.m.

Break and Exhibitor Showcase

10:30 a.m.

Breakout Sessions

Session 5: Animal Mortality Composting

Moderators: Jean Bonhotal and Gary Flory

·        Quantification of Sodium Pentobarbital Residues from Equine Mortality Compost Piles

o   Josh Payne, Oklahoma State University

·        Novel Molecular and Microbial Insights into Mortality Composting

o   Tim Reuter, Alberta Agriculture, Food and Rural Development

·        Nutrient and Moisture Distribution Within Large Animal Carcass Compost Piles

o   Bill Seekins, Maine Compost Team

·        Suitability of Sunflower-Hulls-Based Turkey Litter for On-Farm Turkey Carcass Composting Seasonally

o   Shafiqur Rahman, North Dakota State University

Session 6: Depopulation, Decontamination/Disinfection and Recovery

Moderators: Larry Sikora and Mark King

·        Persistence and Inactivation of a Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (H5N1) Virus

o   Joseph Wood, US EPA National Homeland Security Research Center

·        Mass Depopulation Technologies and Policy

o   Darrel Styles, USDA APHIS

·        Validation of Decontamination Processes in the Agri-Food Context

o   Elizabeth Rohonczy, Canadian Food Inspection Agency

·        Animal Mortality Response Capability Gaps: Federal R&D

o   Lori Miller, USDA APHIS

12:30 p.m.

Lunch

1:15 p.m.

Poster Review and Exhibitor Showcase

2:00 p.m.

Plenary Presentation

Knowledgeable, Ready, and Able: A Comprehensive Extension Agro-Security Program for the Livestock and Poultry Industries

Tom Glanville, Iowa State University

2:30 p.m.

Breakout Sessions

Session 7: Policy and Education

Moderators: Heather Simmons and Mark Hutchinson

·        FMD Global Lessons Learned and the Shift in US Strategy

o   Lori Miller, USDA APHIS

·        Canada Initiatives – Outbreak Response and Effective Disease Control Measures

o   Jim Clark , Canadian Food Inspection Agency

·        The Socio-Economic, Environmental and Biosecurity Aspects of Livestock Carcass Disposal Methods: Impacts of European Policy

o   Prysor Williams, Bangor University

International Panel Discussion

Facilitator: Heather Simmons, FAZD

Guest Panelists: Jim Clark, Juan Reyes, Heekwon Ahn, Brendan Pollard, Prysor Williams, Van Dang Ky

Session 8: By-products and Foods of Animal Origin

Moderators: Shaun Kennedy and Dale Rozeboom

·        Composting Of Specified Risk Materials In Canada As A Management Approach

o   Gordon Price, Nova Scotia Agricultural College

·        Foot and Mouth Disease Continuity of Business Planning for the U.S. Dairy Industry and Milk Disposal I

o   Pam Hullinger and Danelle Bickett-Weddle, Center for Food Security and Public Health, Iowa State University

·        Foot And Mouth Disease Continuity Of Business Planning for the U.S. Dairy Industry and Milk Disposal II

o   Pam Hullinger and Danelle Bickett-Weddle, Center for Food Security and Public Health, Iowa State University

·        Movement Control Project 2011-2012

o   Eric Hess and Mike Neault, Multi-State Partnership for Security in Agriculture

  • USDA APHIS Veterinary Services: Our Roles in the International Movement of Animal Origin Food Products and Live Animals

o   Jennifer Juers-Green, USDA, APHIS, VS

5:00 p.m.

Poster Presentations

·        Field Testing of Bone Screening and Beneficial Reuse of Large Animal Mortality Compost by Robert Clark

·        Serological Investigation of Salmonellosis in Some Wild Birds and Human Contacts by Amr Hashem

·        A Comparison of The Quantity and Quality of Leachate Generated by Compost Piles Exposed to Natural and Artificially Induced Precipitation by Mark King

·        Small Scale Composting at the UNE Marine Animal Rehabilitation Center Compost Facility by Keith Matassa

·        Online Mortality Certification Course by Amanda Meddles

·        Biosecurity messaging: What do the recipients of our messages think? by Dale Moore

·        A Literature Review on Disinfecting Chemicals for Improved Bio-Security of Emergency Animal Mortality Composting and Anaerobic Digestion by Lam Nguyen

·        Static Composting of Equine Mortality by C.A. Shea Porr

·        Training First Responders on Equine Handling and Technical Rescue by C.A. Shea Porr

·        Behavior of Microbial Communities Beneath a Mortalities Burial Site using CPN-60 Taxonomic Profiling by Dyan Pratt

·        Economic Costs of In-vessel and Open Static Pile Systems for Routine Mortality Management on Swine Farms by Dale Rozeboom

·        Disposal Planning with Landfills byAnna Ruman

·        United States Dead Animal Disposal Laws by Mary Schwarz

6:30 p.m.

Dinner on your own

May 24, 2011

7:30 a.m.

Registration, Breakfast Available, Exhibitor Showcase

8 a.m.

Cross-Border FMD Response Disease Simulation Workshop
(This session runs from 8 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. with a break)

This workshop will include a break out session and a facilitated scenario discussion.  It will provide participants an opportunity to analyze a fictitious cross-border FMD outbreak and identify issues and gaps related to movement, depopulation, disposal and decontamination activities.  Participants will be divided into groups to discuss and document issues and gaps, then report back to the larger group on their findings.  The overall list of issues and gaps will form the basis for a prioritized list of identified actions.  A summary of the workshop findings will be posted on the Symposium website as part of the proceedings.

11:45 a.m.

Board Buses with Box Lunches to Demonstration Area at the MSU Tollgate Facility

1 p.m.

Demonstrations  

Demonstration area will feature the construction of a carcass compost static pile, milk truck decontamination, carcass reduction through enviro processors and alkaline hydrolysis, farm animal euthanasia, biological decontamination, microwave sterilization, in-vessel composting, gasification, and foam euthanasia.

6 p.m.

Return to Doubletree Hotel

Demonstrations

 

Demonstration Descriptions (Tentative)

1)      Foam Euthanasia. The Martin Michigan Fire Department and USDA National Veterinary Stockpile. The Martin Fire Department will demonstrate the CAFSCO, CSWAT 1.5 Module pneumatic foam manifold. Commercialization of this unit is pending. Chemguard “First Class” will be the non-corrosive, non-toxic, biodegradable Class A foam concentrate used. It is a non-corrosive, non-toxic, and biodegradable Class “A” foam concentrate. A portable foam depopulation unit similar to one type of unit that is inventoried in the National Veterinary Stockpile for Avian Influenza response will also be demonstrated to show the similarities and differences of the foam application methods.

2)      Small Transportable Gasifying Unit. Biomass Marketing Associates have been developing compact gasifier systems for addressing daily mortality disposal in the poultry and swine industry as well as the animal shelter and highway department carcass disposal arena.  They will be demonstrating a small gasifier unit to show the simplicity and versatility of the process and the potential for wide industry application.

3)      In-Vessel Food Composting. Eco Value Technology, Inc., Alpena, Michigan. Attendees will have the opportunity to observe the in-vessel composting of foods of animal origin.  This firm uses heavy duty durable construction with proven components and electronic controls to optimize composting conditions such as moisture, temperature, and oxygen.

4)      Microwave Sterilization. Sanitec Industries of California and Indiana has been processing and sterilizing medical waste across the US for many years.  Over the last 6 years they have been working with the agriculture industry to modify their equipment for processing of animal carcasses during non-prion disease outbreaks.  They will be exhibiting their mobile sterilization unit (Big Red Machine) which loads, grinds, steam and microwave sterilizes, and discharges into traditional waste containers.  Material may then be safely composted or placed in a landfill.

5)      Farm Animal Euthanasia. Dr. Jan Shearer, Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine. The objectives of the laboratory session will be to familiarize participants with information from the updated version of the AVMA Guidelines on Euthanasia of livestock. The clinic will include video demonstration of euthanasia techniques and application of physical methods for euthanasia of livestock including use of firearms, penetrating and non-penetrating captive bolt. Proper handling, placement and firing of the captive bolt will be demonstrated.

6)      HAZMAT Unit. Novi Fire Department. The purpose of this demonstration will be to show the proper decontamination procedures that are necessary to reduce or eliminate to spread of biological contamination. This will be accomplished by highlighting the engineering controls and work place practices that can be used to protect the worker and environment from the spread of contaminants. A simulated decontamination line will be used to demonstrate proper PPE selection and donning procedures, set-up of a decontamination area and proper decontamination procedures. The demonstration will conclude with termination of decontamination activities that include proper removal of PPE and disposable of contaminated materials.

7)      Alkaline Hydrolysis. BioLiquidation, Pittsboro, Indiana. Alkaline hydrolysis tissue digestion is a non-burn process during which animal tissues are broken down into their basic building blocks. This naturally-occurring process is accelerated in the BioLiquidator system, producing a sterile solution of amino acids, small peptides, sugars, nutrients, and soap, along with the mineral ash of the bones and teeth (calcium phosphate). Alkaline hydrolysis allows the nutrients to be recycled back to the environment safely. Through the thermochemical process, any pathogens that may be present in the tissues are sterilized.

8)      Carcass Reduction. Supreme Enviro Processors, Brodie Ag & Industrial Inc. Ontario. This machine is equipped with a patented auger design and has the ability to cut and blend various compost materials such as green waste, vegetable waste, biosolids, wood, and mortalities. The result is a thorough and accurate mixture with a consistent and even distribution of moisture and porosity throughout the entire mix. Results are a quicker composting process and a more consistent product. The material may also be size-appropriate for anaerobic digestion.

9)      Carcass Compost Carcass Dig!  This demonstration will allow you to participate in excavating a 10 week old carcass compost pile. Participants will learn how to properly use compost as a management tool in both routine and catastrophic events. You will see and experience how different compost feedstocks and pile construction affect the rate of decomposition.  Different management strategies for varying needs will be discussed.  This one may require a strong stomach!

10)   Construction of a Carcass Compost Static Pile:  This demonstration will provide you with a ‘hands on’ opportunity to experience the construction of a carcass compost pile. Participants will learn the proper layering, volume and size requirements for efficient composting and vector control. Common reasons for poor composting performance will also be shared.  Be prepared to grab a shovel and join in on the fun!

11)   Milk Truck Decontamination. Ogena Solutions Canada Corp. Foam disinfection of a 10 wheel truck, used for hauling milk, will be demonstrated.  The ability to do so will be essential in the emergency management of possible disease outbreaks and continued production on nearby farms.  

Meat Laboratory

Meat Laboratory
1360 Anthony Hall

The Michigan State University Meat Laboratory is part of the animal science complex (Anthony Hall) renovated through the Animal Industry Initiative in 1995 through 1998.  This is a USDA-inspected teaching, research and outreach facility, which is managed by the Department of Animal Science and the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition. Laboratory activities support the teaching, research and outreach efforts of the faculty of these departments and others at MSU

The Meat Laboratory contains over 67,000 total square feet. Almost 18,000 square feet is dedicated to red meat and poultry slaughter and subsequent processing, including curing, cooking and equipment storage. The abattoir is designed to efficiently slaughter all major red meat and poultry species. It contains supporting refrigeration for chilling, cutting and further processing. The facility contains a sausage kitchen, which is equipped with all major processing equipment scaled down for laboratory-sized meat formulations. The kitchen is supported by appropriate refrigerated curing rooms, smokehouses capable of natural as well as liquid smoke applications and other pertinent cooking equipment.  

There is over 15,000 square feet dedicated for personnel and over 5,000 square feet dedicated to two classrooms, which have full access to carcasses/meat from the pilot facility. There are three research laboratories and support facilities dedicated to understanding, improvement of meat chemistry, muscle growth, meat quality and meat microbiology. 

The Meal Lab offers the following many types of meat products.  If you are interested, please contact Jennifer Dominguez (Meat Lab Manager) at (517) 432-0753.

Contact:

Sarah Wells, Facility Coordinator                    
Food Science and Human Nutrition                    
Michigan State University                                 
3385D Anthony Hall                                         
East Lansing, MI  48824-1224                           
Phone: (517) 355-8452, Ext. 205                        
Fax: (517) 432-0753                                          
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)                            

Jennifer Dominguez , Facility Manager
Food Science and Human Nutrition
Michigan State University
1358 Anthony Hall
East Lansing, MI  48824-1224
Phone: (517) 353-9773
Food Science Fax: (517) 432-0753
Animal Science Fax:  (517) 353-1699
E-mail:  .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Animal Science Scholarships

Listed below are scholarships for which ANS 4-Years students may be eligible. 

Richard and Dana Balander Avian Scholarship
This scholarship will award up to $1,500 dollars to honor and encourage students pursuing a poultry or avian species related career. Academic performance, leadership attributes, career ambitions and financial need will be considered by the selection committee. Undergraduate students will receive primary consideration, but graduate students are also encouraged to apply. Applications are available in spring semester in 1250 Anthony Hall. Deadline is May 15 for completed applications.

Howard E. Cowles Dairy Prize
Awarded annually to juniors born in Michigan and who are majoring in Animal Science with an interest in dairy. Students must also exhibit interest and participation in extracurricular dairy activities. Recipients are selected by the faculty of Animal Science from students who meet criteria for eligibility.

Michigan Dairy Memorial Scholarships
Tuition scholarships of $1,500/year for freshmen or $3,500/year to full tuition and fees for sophomores, juniors and seniors are available to students preparing for careers in the dairy industry. Applications are available online. Deadline for completed applications is September 27 for freshmen and February 28 for sophomores, juniors and seniors.

Learn more . . .

Jack and Betty Barnes International Michigan Dairy
Memorial Scholarship
A tuition scholarship of $1,000 is available to students meeting eligibility criteria for Michigan Dairy Memorial Scholarships and who desire an international experience to enhance their education. Applications are available by clicking here. Deadline for completed applications is April 1.

Michigan Livestock Industry Scholarship Foundation
The MLISF promotes and rewards excellence in the live-stock (beef cattle, sheep, swine, meat products and horse) industry. The foundation provides scholarships for students pursuing careers in the livestock industry. The scholarship ensures that gifted and motivated young leaders enter careers in livestock and allied industries. Awards are generally between $1,000 and $1,500 in each of the fall and spring semesters. Applications can be downloaded here. The deadline for completed applications is March 2, 2015. For additional information, the selection process and applicaiton guidelines, please download the MLISF flyer.  Contact Dr. Daniel Buskirk (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)) or (517) 432-0400 for additional information.

Michigan Pork Producers Association Scholarship
Scholarships of $1,000, $500, $250 are awarded annually to undergraduates with an interest in the swine industry. Applications are available from Michigan Pork Producers Association. Deadline is January 15 for completed applications.

Ralph Hudson Scholarship
A $250 cash award is given to the Outstanding Block and Bridle Club member selected by the faculty of Animal Science.

Reginald A. Emmert Scholarship
The Reginald Emmert Endowed Scholarship is intended to honor and encourage full-time, undergraduate students majoring in the Department of Animal Science with emphasis in livestock production in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at Michigan State University. It is the intent of the donors, that this scholarship provides motivation and incentive to students demonstrating a desire to pursue careers in Animal Science.

Scholarship applications are due March 2, 2015. Generally, between 4 and 6 scholarships are awarded and while amounts vary, the general award is between $1000 and $2000 per semester. Students may reapply.

CRITERIA

  1. Fulltime students pursuing an undergraduate degree in the MSU College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, majoring in the Department of Animal Sciencewith emphasis in Livestock Production.
  2. Demonstrate sound academic achievement by maintaining 2.5 average GPA.
  3. Demonstrate an intent to pursue a career in Livestock Production and related fields.
  4. Evidence of the involvement in community activities with demonstrated leadership abilities.
  5. Graduation from a high school located within the United States.
  6. Preference will be given to students who might not be able to attend college due to financial constraints.

Applications are available online here.

For more informaiton and the applciation process, please download the Emmert Scholarship Flyer.

For further assistance, please contact Dr. Daniel Buskirk (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)/517-432-0400).

Harry Moxley Scholarship
A $250 cash award is given to the outstanding junior in Animal Science with a livestock emphasis. The recipient is selected by the faculty of Animal Science.

Scholarships for Students Enrolled in the Institute of Agricultural Technology

Michigan Milk Producers Association Scholarship
Eight awards are presented annually to Ag Tech Dairy Management students interested in pursuing careers in dairy farming. Recipients must be MMPA members, or children or employees of members. Applications are available in 1250F Anthony Hall. Deadline for completed applications is September 15.

Additional Regional or National Scholarships

National Dairy Shrine scholarships
The National Dairy Shrine offers scholarships to college students with an interest in dairy, with awards totaling over $30,000/year. Eligibility details and applications for seven recognition programs and scholarships are available at www.dairyshrine.org.

The CME Group and National Pork Producers Scholarship
Introduced in 1990 to celebrate the 25th Anniversary of Live Hog Futures, the Lois Britt Memorial Pork Industry Scholarship Program continues to recognize outstanding youth in the pork community. Four $2,500 scholarships will be awarded to students who intend to pursue a career in the pork industry-talented and thoughtful students who may emerge as industry leaders someday.

Other Agriculture-related Scholarships

Hoard’s Dairyman provides a listing of scholarships available to youth majoring in agriculture or with a dairy background.

AGRILAND FS, Inc., a farmer-owned cooperative, is awarding a total of $10,000.00 in scholarships this year. This includes six (6) $1000 scholarships and one (1) $1500 Memorial Award scholarship to high school seniors that graduate in 2014.  Each scholarship will support students from the company’s geography planning to pursue a major in an agriculture related field of study. Additionally, we will be offering two (2) undergraduate scholarships. One (1) of these will be awarded to a second-year student currently enrolled at a community college as an ag business, ag tech, precision ag, or ag transfer major. The other will be awarded to a third-year undergraduate for ag major with minor or emphasis in agronomy/crop production.  For more information, please visit the  website.

Scholarships

Links to Scholarship Information

The Office of Financial Aid, located in Room 259 Student Services (353-5940), distributes more than 60 million dollars in financial assistance to over 50% of the MSU student population. A number of scholarship, loan, grant, and work study packages are available for students who inquire.

Things To Do

Area Attractions

The Henry Ford Museum

Trace the history of the auto and our fascination with it. Browse through other American inventions and the staggering collection of Henry Fords estate. The estate includes the chair Abraham Lincoln sat in when he was assassinated and the limo in which John F. Kennedy was shot.

Greenfield Village

Travel through time in the seven historic districts of Greenfield Village.

Rouge Factory Tour

The Ford Rouge Factory Tour is an excursion where environmental innovation and industrial production combine.

The Henry Ford Estate

A National Historic Landmark, Fair Lane was Henry Ford’s family retreat.

Automotive Hall of Fame

This museum gives recognizes those who distinguished themselves in the auto industry.

Arab American National Museum

The Arab American National Museum (AANM) is the first and only museum in the United States devoted to Arab American history and culture.

Shopping

Fairlane Town Center

Greenfield Village Store - Remember your journey through time with a purchase from the Village Store at the entrance to Greenfield Village. Village admission is not required and the Village Store is open during Greenfield Village hours.

Liberty Craftworks Store - The handmade crafts of American artisans will captivate you in their arts and crafts-inspired store located at the entrance to the Liberty Craftworks district. The store is open during Greenfield Village hours.

Dining

Dearborn boasts over a hundred eateries. TripAdvisor has compiled a list of these eateries and provides information on the different cuisines offered along with a price range for most locations.

 

 

Become a Sponsor or Exhibitor

The International Symposium on Managing Animal Mortality, Products, By-Products, and Associated Health Risk will be celebrating its fourth symposium in 2012 and we want you to be a part of it. Since its inception in 2000, the Symposium has grown from a small meeting to a larger research, industry, and agency driven conference that attracts more than 200 people who work internationally in veterinary medicine, food and recreational animal production, food animal processing, government, academia, cooperative extension, food and agriculture emergency preparedness, public health, and animal tissue disposal. The conference was developed by researchers, government agency employees, food animal processors, and renderers. Its founders and planning members continue to be committed to building a program packed with useful and timely information. Thanks to our sponsors, the symposium has been able to continually expand its offerings while remaining true to its mission to connect research, regulation and response.

We’re inviting you to be a part of our continued impact by becoming a sponsor of the 2012 symposium. This is a key opportunity to position your name in front of the researchers, industry, and government agencies from around the world. Sponsors, exhibitors, and demonstrators will have ample time and space to create “networking” opportunities with participants. You may choose to gain exposure through a financial sponsorship to support a meal or break or by selecting an indoor or outdoor static onsite display to showcase your company’s latest in technology. Another option is to participate in an off-site demonstration. Off-site demonstrations will take place at the Tollgate Center; a Michigan State University property near Dearborn. In addition to interaction during breaks, receptions, and meals, vendors and sponsor are encouraged to participate in sessions throughout the day.

Learn more about sponsor and exhibitor opportunities.

Register your sponsorship.

The 2012 symposium will be held May 21-24, 2012 at the DoubleTree by Hilton in Dearborn, Michigan. The conference will feature keynote speakers who will address the need for involvement from the international community in the development of education, research, management, and response programs. Presentations and poster displays are planned with a focus on:

  • Carcass management in response to routine mortalities, accidental deaths, natural disasters, and disease outbreaks;
  • Food of animal origin containment, disposal and decontamination in response to disease and emergency events;
  • Carcass treatment (management) options;
  • New and emerging technologies for euthanasia, carcass treatment, and disinfection;
  • Final product use and disposition.
  • Research and public policy on carcass disposal and the direction of future research and resources;
  • International, federal and state agency response and training experience;
  • One Health Initiative; and
  • Global considerations.

If you have questions, please contact Mark by e-mail (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)) or phone (207-592-0455) or Dale by e-mail (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)) or phone (517-355-8398).

Thank you in advance for your support of the continued growth of mortality management research and outreach! We look forward to seeing you in May.

Call for Papers and Posters

Managing animal tissue (mortalities, products and by-products) is a significant challenge and a major responsibility for routine production of animals as well as in emergencies. Catastrophic losses of poultry and livestock caused by disease, fire, or weather-related stresses, and routine losses associated with large-scale production operations, have become significant environmental, biosecurity, and waste management concerns around the globe.

The 4th International Symposium on Managing Animal Mortality, Products, By-Products, and Associated Health Risk will highlight lessons learned from animal health management during disease outbreaks, mass casualties, and routine loss experiences; discuss new research findings (basic and applied); address current and emerging disposal methodologies, disease containment strategies (depopulation, disposal, and decontamination) and animal tissues management technologies; and critical assessments of public policy. The overall intent of the symposium is to capture and disseminate new information on these topics, and to stimulate development of additional research, policy development, and educational programs.

Review symposium themes and paper and poster guidelines and submit your abstract for consideration.

Presentation submissions are closed. Poster abstract proposals will be accepted until April 20, 2012. 

Papers should adhere to the symposium paper guidelines, which can be found at http://web2.msue.msu.edu/smam/includes/speakerguidelinesPaper1.pdf. Papers should be submitted in Word or searchable PDF for the proceedings to Megghan Honke (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)), event coordinator at Michigan State University by (April 20, 2012)

Accomodations

Make your reservations by calling or e-mailing our personal Conference Coordinator Heather Harrison at (313) 982-3982 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or make your reservations online.

A block of rooms have been reserved for May 19, 2012 – May 27, 2012. The special room rate will be available until May 19th or until the group block is sold-out, whichever comes first. Please provide the group name “symposium for animal mortality composting” and/or group code “MSU.”

Special Room Rate: from $89 per night for 1 King Bed, Non-Smoking. Call for other options.

DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Detroit – Dearborn website

Directions and transportation to the hotel

Agricultural Technology Certificate Programs

The Department of Animal Science and the Institute of Agricultural Technology (Ag Tech) offer students a vocational education.  Program areas coordinated in ANS include dairy, beef, swine, and horse management.  These programs are designed to meet the needs of students who choose a career in practical production agriculture and are interested in application of knowledge to farms. Courses are animal oriented and are taught largely with a practical philosophy.  Agricultural Technology programs are 12 to 18 months in duration.  They involve two to three semesters on campus taking courses in a program area.  After about two semesters of course work, students are encouraged to participate in an internship or placement training, on a commercial farm.  These internships allow Ag Tech students to gain experience to apply classroom information, to develop skills with animals, to refine skills for teamwork, and to network with potential employers. Students may enroll for up to 6 credits and 6 months of placement training under the supervision of faculty from ANS. 

Students enrolled in Animal Science Ag Tech programs receive all services and resources available to students at Michigan State University, including intramural sports, spectator for university athletics, financial aid, and housing. Ag Tech students are encouraged to participate in student clubs within the department and college.

For additional information or to apply to the Institute of Agricultural Technology please go to http://iat.msu.edu/

Dairy Management in the Institute of Agricultural Technology
Coordinator: Dr. Joe Domecq, 517-353-7855 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Because dairy farming is the leading agricultural enterprise in Michigan, the dairy program has been developed to meet the specialized needs of the herd manager and commercial dairy farm. There are many opportunities for employment of people with practical experience combined with classroom training in dairy husbandry, nutrition, artificial insemination, crops, and farm business management. All students must complete an internship on a cooperating dairy farm in Michigan or other states.

Programs of study are designed to meet the needs of individuals. Consequently, in addition to dairy courses, all students may learn about agribusiness management, communications, crop and soil sciences, and agricultural mechanics.  To earn a certificate in Dairy Management students must complete 48 credits including an internship.

Suggested Curriculum 

 

 

Decision Making in the Agri-Food System ABM 100 3 cr.
Farm Management I ABM 130 3 cr.
Dairy Farm Management Seminar ANS 132 1 cr.
Introduction to Dairy Production ANS 232 3 cr.
Technical Math AT 071 2 cr.
Agriculture Communications AT 045 2 cr.
Microcomputers CSS 110 2 cr.
Dairy Herd Reproduction ANS 235 2 cr.
Principles of Livestock Feeding ANS 203 2 cr.
Livestock Physiology ANS 205 2 cr.
Dairy Health Management ANS 238 3 cr.
Spanish for Agriculture AT 291 2 cr.
Professional Internship in Ag Technology AT 293 3 cr.
Commodity Marketing I ABM 225 3 cr.
Dairy Herd Management ANS 230 3 cr.
Dairy Feed Management ANS 233 3 cr.
Growth, Health and Lactation in Dairy Cattle ANS 215 2 cr.
Forage Crops  CSS 201 3 cr.

Horse Management in the Institute of Agricultural Technology

Coordinator: Dr. Camie Heleski, 517-355-8427 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Horse Management emphasizes enterprise and animal management and equine skills. The goal is to prepare students for positions growing horse industry of the United States. For students who have the proper training in management and production techniques, students have many opportunities for employment in the saddle, pleasure, and racehorse industries. The Horse Management program offers the most current education and training available in these areas.

Students spend one semester on placement training working with professionals in the horse industry. Leaders within the horse industry have been very supportive and are ready and willing to work closely with students. To earn a certificate in Horse Management students must complete 48 credits including an internship.

Suggested Curriculum

 

 

Horse Behavior & Welfare ANS 145 1 cr.
Fundamentals of Horsemanship ANS 140 2 cr.
Introductory Horse Management ANS 242 3 cr.
Farm Management I ABM 130 3 cr.
Technical Math AT 071 2 cr.
Agriculture Communications AT 045 2 cr.
Microcomputers CSS 110 2 cr.
Introductory Judging Horses ANS 200D 2 cr.
Fundamentals of Horse Training or ANS 146 2 cr.
    Horsemanship II Section 002 ANS 140
Horse Management Placement Seminar ANS 147 1 cr.
Horse Management Clerkship at MSU Farm ANS 149 2 cr.
Principles of Livestock Feeding ANS 203 2 cr.
Livestock Physiology ANS 205 2 cr.
Placement Training/Internship AT 293 6 cr.
Horse Farm Management ANS 240 3 cr.
Horse Nutrition & Feeding ANS 243 2 cr.
Horse Exercise Physiology ANS 245 2 cr.
Horse Selection & Judging II (other options)   ANS 300D 1-2 cr.
Agribusiness & Food Industry Sales (other options) ABM 222 3 cr.
Forage Crops (other options) CSS 201 3 cr.

 

Beef Management in the Institute of Agricultural Technology

Coordinator: Dr. Dennis Banks, 517-355-4704 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

This program is designed allow students the opportunity to specialize in production and management of beef cattle. The program also provides the flexibility to integrate other livestock species to develop individualized programs of study. Many livestock program graduates return to the home farm. However, many requests are received for potential employees who are capable, industrious, have the practical experience, and have specialized training provided through the Beef Management program. These requests are for positions of responsibility as herd managers, assistant herd managers, and in other livestock-related areas.

In this rapidly changing era, agriculture requires aggressive young people who have specialized training in modern scientific farming. The demands for success are limited only by desire, imagination, and knowledge. To earn a certificate in Beef Management students must complete 35 credits including an internship.

Suggested Curriculum

 

 

Farm Management I ABM 130 3 cr.
Animal and Product Evaluation ANS 211 3 cr.
Feedlot Clerkship ANS 122A 2 cr.
Computer Applications CSS 110 2 cr.
General Education1 4 cr.
Cow/Calf Clerkship ANS 122B 2 cr.
Principles of Livestock Feeding ANS 203 2 cr.
Livestock Physiology ANS 205 2 cr.
Introduction Animal Agriculture ANS 110 4 cr.
Introduction Beef Cattle Management ANS 222 3 cr.
Professional Internship in Ag Technology AT 293 6 cr.
General Education
Agricultural Communications (FS & SS)1 AT 045 2 cr.
Technical Mathematics (FS)1 AT 071 2 cr.
Suggested Electives
Decision Making in the Agri-Food System (FS) ABM 100 3 cr.
Introductory Judging of Livestock and Carcasses (SS) ANS 200A  1-3 cr.
Merchandising Purebred Livestock (SS-Even Years) ANS 212 2 cr.
Introductory Horse Management (FS) ANS 242 3 cr.
Principles of Animal Environments (SS) ANS 261 2 cr.
Introductory Sheep Management (SS) ANS 262 3 cr.
Introductory Swine Management (FS) ANS 272 3 cr.
Agricultural Finance (SS) AT 055 2 cr.
Introduction to Crop Science (FS) CSS 101 3 cr.
Forage Crops (FS) CSS 201 3 cr.

 

Swine Management in the Institute of Agricultural technology

Coordinator: Dr. Dennis Banks, 517-355-4704 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Pork is the most consumed meat in the world. As the human population increases so does the demand for quality food, including pork. To feed this growing number of people, the livestock industry will need highly-skilled people.

The Swine Management program is designed to prepare people for careers in modern pork production anywhere in the world. The one year program balances practical training with classroom instruction. Subjects addressed are animal care, nutrition, housing maintenance, swine health, reproduction, records management, environmental management and personnel management. Students also gain practical experience during an internship on a commercial swine farm in Michigan or other states. Swine Management graduates will have numerous career opportunities including: farm owners/operator, manager or assistant manager of production (breeding herd, farrowing, nursery grower-finisher, transportation, feeds, marketing), local or regional company representative. To earn a certificate in Swine Management students must complete 35 credits including an internship.

Suggested Curriculum

 

 

Farm Management I ABM 130 3 cr.
Live Animal and Carcass Evaluation ANS 211 3 cr.
Swine Management ANS 272 3 cr.
Swine Clerkship ANS 171 2 cr.
Technical Math AT 071 2 cr.
Agriculture Communications AT 045 2 cr.
Microcomputers CSS 110 2 cr.
First Aid and CPR AT 098 1 cr.
Introductory Animal Agriculture ANS 110 4 cr.
Principles of Livestock Feeding ANS 203 2cr.
Livestock Physiology ANS 205 2 cr.
Principle of Animal Environments ATM 261 2 cr.
Ag Facilities Maintenance ATM 062 2 cr.
Placement Training AT 099 3 cr.
Agriculture Communications AT 045 2 cr.
Leadership AT 095 2 cr.

Specializations in CANR

Biotechnology

This specialization is primarily for students who plan to attend graduate school and earn MS or PhD. This program adds 10 to 13 credits to BS program. With completion, this specialization appears on transcript.

Example courses are:

  • BMB 401 Biochemistry
  • HRT 486 Biotechnology in Agriculture
  • ANS 314 Genetics                         
  • ANS 425 Animal Biotechnology

For questions or to enroll in the Biotechnology Specialization contact Dr. Richard Brandenburg at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 517-355-0236.

Agribusiness Management

This specialization is for students not majoring in business or agribusiness but who desire careers in agribusiness. The goal is to provide fundamental knowledge of business related to agricultural enterprise. This program adds 18 credits to BS program. With completion, this specialization appears on transcript.

Example courses are:

  • ABM 100 Decision Making 
  • ABM 130 Farm Management I
  • ABM 225 Commodity Marketing  
  • ABM 332 Operations Management
  • ABM 430 Farm Management II    
  • ABM 222 Sales
  • ABM 337 Labor Management      
  • ABM 400 Public Policy
  • ABM 422 Vertical Coordination    
  • ABM 425 Commodity Marketing
  • ABM 427 Global Agri-Food          
  • ABM 435 Financial Management
  • ABM 437 Strategic Management 
  • ACC 230 Accounting
  • GBL 323 Business Law                
  • HED 373 Entrepreneurship
  • MGT 325 Management Skills       
  • MSC 327 Marketing
  • FIM 335 Food Marketing

For questions or to enroll in the Agribusiness Specialization contact Ruthi Bloomfield at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 517-432-5298.

Production Animal Scholars Concentration

Production Animal Scholars (PAS) is an academic concentration for undergraduate students who aspire to work with animals that produce food for humans in veterinary medicine or an advanced aspect of animal science. Horses and companion animals are excluded from this concentration. The PAS concentration is based strongly in science and will prepare students for many professions in science and is not limited to preparation for veterinary college.

Eligibility for Undergraduate Production Animal Scholars

The Department of Animal Science will coordinate the undergraduate program. All Production Animal Scholars will be majors in Animal Science. There are no academic or experiential requirements to enroll in the undergraduate PAS concentration. There will be forthright discussions about professional goals and high academic performance will be required. The Department of Animal Science will not impose any entrance requirements or selection criteria for a student to be in Production Animal Scholars. Except for references from faculty, Animal Science has no role in whether students are admitted to CVM.

For requirements to apply and for admission into CVM, see text below list of courses. Or, go to website for College of Veterinary Medicine at MSU (http://cvm.msu.edu), then click Prospective DVM Students, and then click Production Medicine Scholars Admissions Pathway. 

Specific course requirements for Production Animal Scholars:    

ALL OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES: (*required for admission to MSU Veterinary Medicine)

ANS 201

Animal Products

F

3

BS 162

Organisms and Populations

F,S, SS

4

BS 172

Organisms and Populations Laboratory

F,S, SS

2

BMB 401

Biochemistry

F,S, SS

4

CEM 161

Chemistry Laboratory I

F,S,SS

1

CEM 252

Organic Chemistry II

F,S, SS

3

CEM 255

Organic Chemistry Lab

F,S, SS

2

*MMG 301

Introductory Microbiology

F,S,SS

3

*MMG 302

Introductory Microbiology Laboratory

S,SS

1

*MMG 409

Eucaryotic Cell Biology

S,SS

3

*PHY 231

Introductory Physics I

F,S, SS

3

*PHY 232

Introductory Physics II

F,S,SS

3

*PHY 251

Introductory Physics Laboratory I

F,S,SS

1

*PHY 252

Introductory Physics Laboratory II

F,S,SS

1

 

TOTAL CREDITS 34

ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES in addition to the required species management course from ANS Core for a total of two courses. ANS 242 and 282 are excluded.

ANS 222

Introductory Beef Management

S

3

ANS 232

Introductory Dairy Management

F

3

ANS 252

Introduction to Management of Avian Species

F odd yr.

3

ANS 262

Introductory Sheep Management

S

3

ANS 272

Introductory Swine Management

F

3

 

TOTAL CREDITS 3

TWO OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES:

ABM 435

Financial Management in the Agri-Food System

S

3

ABM 437

Agribusiness Strategic Management

S

3

ANS 413

Non-Ruminant Nutrition

S

3

ANS 483

Ruminant Nutrition

S

3

 

TOTAL CREDITS 6

ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES:

 

ANS 305

Applied Animal Behavior

S

3

ANS 309

Animal Health Management

F

3

ANS 405

Endocrinology of Reproduction

F

4

ANS 425

Principles of Animal Biotechnology

S

3

ANS 435

Mammary Physiology

S

4

 

TOTAL CREDITS 3-4

ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES:

ANS 422

Advanced Beef Feedlot Management

F

3

ANS 432

Advanced Dairy Cattle Management

F

3

ANS 472

Advanced Swine Management

S even years

3

 

TOTAL CREDITS 3

THREE CREDITS  OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES:

ANS 407

Food and Animal Toxicology

F

3

ANS 418

Comprehensive Nutrient Management

F

3

ANS 455

Avian Physiology

S

4

ZOL 313

Animal Behavior

F, S, SS

3

ZOL 341

Fundamental Genetics (Can replace ANS 314)

F. S. SS

4

*Pre-Veterinary science requirement.

To address questions or for additional information about Production Animal Scholars, contact Elizabeth Karcher in Department of Animal Science at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 517-353-8518.

Requirements to apply to CVM through Production Animal Scholars:

To be accepted into College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) or graduate school, students must have excellent academic performance and experiences that establish a commitment and passion for food animals. These experiences must include management of food animals and work with food animal veterinarians. So, there are two criteria for PAS students to be accepted into CVM, academic excellence and experience. PAS students must complete BS degree before starting CVM.

Objective academic standards for consideration at CVM are: cumulative GPA of 3.2 throughout academic undergraduate studies, minimum of 3.2 GPA for pre-veterinary sciences, and minimal Scholastic Indicator Score for CVM of 790. Non-academic requirements are to establish an academic advisor in Animal Science, to demonstrate a commitment to livestock agriculture through diverse experiences, and to have quality exposure to veterinary practice.

Given that minimal credits are completed and academic performance is adequate, students may apply to CVM as early as after sophomore year. However, application to CVM should occur when experience is maximal. Usually, students apply to CVM between junior and senior year. However, some urban students may delay application to CVM until after senior year is complete to gain additional experience.

General requirements to apply to CVM:

  • Completion of at lest 50% of required pre-veterinary courses and at least 10 credits from additional courses required for Production Animal Scholars concentration.
  • Quality experience with a veterinarian who works with food animals.
  • Three letters of recommendation:
    • One from academic advisor in Animal Science
    • One from a faculty, agricultural professional, or a veterinarian
    • One from a veterinarian.
  • Completion of the GRE examination
  • A strong commitment to livestock agriculture.  This can be demonstrated with youth activities, family experiences, employment, research, extracurricular activities or other forms of service or activities within the livestock industry.  It is not necessary to be raised on a farm to qualify.  There are many ways that any student from diverse backgrounds may demonstrate a commitment to livestock agriculture.
  • Students eligible for selection for the CVM professional program through the Production Animal Scholars pathway must have a scholastic indicator score of at least 790.

    All candidates for the professional veterinary medical program, including Production Animal Scholars, will be selected by the College of Veterinary Medicine Committee on Student Admission. Except for letters from faculty, the Department of Animal Science will not have any direct role on the process to select students for the professional veterinary medical program. Up to ten (10) students who are Production Animal Scholars may be admitted each year into the professional veterinary medical program. If admitted the student must maintain a 3.2 cumulative and 3.2 pre-veterinary science GPA throughout completion of the Bachelor’s Degree.  All pre-veterinary science courses must be completed with a passing grade of 2.0 by the Spring Semester of the year of matriculation.  However, if no Production Medicine Scholar candidates met the standards for performance and selection, none will be accepted. Therefore, Production Animal Scholars is intended to be rigorous and focused on knowledge to enhance livestock production medicine. In addition to the academic and experience requirements, Production Animal Scholars will have opportunities for field trips, seminars, panel discussions, and case studies.

    Application and Admission to the College of Veterinary Medicine:

    • Within 3 to 6 months before application, each student should meet with staff in CVM Admissions to determine eligibility to apply. Contact Donna Grooms (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  or 517-353-9793) in CVM for an appointment.
    • In early August, usually after junior year, an applicant will send a letter to the College of Veterinary Medicine. The letter is short and will state simply that as a Production Animal Scholar you intend to apply to the professional program in veterinary medicine.
    • To intend to apply a student must have completed the academic and experiential requirements stated above and have taken the GRE exam.
    • If CVM agrees that the student has fulfilled requirements to apply, CVM will send an application packet to the student. All aspects of this application packet must be completed and submitted to CVM in early September.
    • A subcommittee of the Admissions Committee will review the completed application.  The Admissions Committee for CVM at Michigan State University reserves the right to conduct interviews.
    • Students who are not accepted into CVM as Production Animal Scholars may request that their application should be in the pool of all regular applicants. Note that if denied admission as a regular applicant, you cannot apply again as a Production Animal Scholar.
    • Typically students apply to CVM during the summer immediately before their senior year. Please note that this schedule will allow for completion of the undergraduate program in Animal Science/Production Animal Scholars before matriculation into CVM.

    Any advantages that Production Animal Scholars have for admission to CVM at Michigan State University do not apply with application to colleges of veterinary medicine in other states.

    Students at Michigan State University who are majoring in Animal Science may wish to enter the professional veterinary medical program without the Production Animal Scholars concentration. These students may apply through the regular veterinary admission process. However, if denied admission through the regular pathway, these students are no longer eligible to apply as Production Animal Scholars.

    The Departments of Animal Science and Large Animal Clinical Sciences are very excited about this new educational opportunity for future veterinarians. In addition, we are enthusiastic and optimistic that this program will address the current shortage of veterinarians for livestock.

    Companion and Exotic Animal Biology Concentration

    Companion and Exotic Animal Biology Concentration is a program for students who aspire to work with animals that are companions or provide esthetic value to humans. This program includes the core courses for animal science, minimal management of animals, focus on science, and electives in diverse areas such as zoology or wildlife. This concentration can also be a path for students to prepare for and apply to veterinary college but these requirements are not illustrated below.

    Specific course requirements for Companion and Exotic Animal Biology Concentration:

    ALL OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES:

    ANS 282

    Companion Animal Biology and Management

    F,S

    3

    BS 162

    Organisms and Populations

    F,S,SS

    4

    BS 172

    Organisms and Populations Laboratory

    F,S,SS

    2

    CEM 252

    Organic Chemistry II

    F,S,SS

    3

    CEM 255

    Organic Chemistry Lab

    F,S,SS

    2

    ZOL 328

    Comparative Anatomy and Biology of Vertebrates

    S

    4

     

    TOTAL CREDITS 18

    ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES:

    BMB 200

    Introduction to Biochemistry

    F,SS

    4

    BMB 401

    Basic Biochemistry

    F,S,SS

    4

     

    TOTAL CREDITS 4

    SIX CREDITS OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES:

    ANS 305

    Applied Animal Behavior

    S

    3

    ANS 409

    Advancements in Reproduction

    F

    3

    ANS 413

    Monogastric Animal Nutrition

    F

    3

    ANS 435

    Mammary Physiology

    S

    4

    ANS 483

    Ruminant Nutrition

    S

    3

     

    TOTAL CREDITS 6-8

    ELEVEN CREDITS  OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES:

    ANS 407

    Food and Animal Toxicology

    F

    3

    ANS 418

    Comprehensive Nutrient Management

    F

    3

    ANS 425

    Principles of Animal Biotechnology

    S

    3

    ANS 445

    Equine Exercise Physiology

    F

    4

    ANS 455

    Avian Physiology

    S

    4

    ZOL 313

    Animal Behavior

    F,S,SS

    3

    ZOL 341

    Fundamental Genetics (Can replace ANS 314)

    F,S,SS

    4

    ZOL 355

    Ecology

    F,S,SS

    3

    ZOL 369

    Introduction to Zoo and Aquarium Science

    S

    3

     

    TOTAL CREDITS 11-16

    ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES:

     

    ANS 492

    Undergraduate Research

    F,S,SS

    3

    ANS 493

    Professional Internship in ANS

    F,S,SS

    3

    Study Abroad

     

     

    6

     

    TOTAL CREDITS 3-6

    Students interested to attend veterinary college must clarify all requirements with advisor or with the college to which they intend to apply. For requirements to apply and for admission into CVM, see text below list of courses. Or, go to website for College of Veterinary Medicine at MSU (http://cvm.msu.edu), then click Prospective DVM Students. 

     

    Animal Biology or Pre-Veterinary Medicine Concentration

    Animal Biology or Pre-Veterinary Concentration includes the core courses for animal science with focus on science. Students who complete this concentration may apply to veterinary college or graduate school. In addition, these students may pursue careers in nutrition, genetics, physiology, or the pharmaceutical industry.

    Specific course requirements for Animal Biology/Pre-Veterinary:  

    ALL OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES:

    ANS 201

    Animal Products

    F

    3

    ANS 425

    Principles of Biotechnology

    S

    3

    CEM 161

    Chemistry Laboratory I

    F,S,SS

    1

    CEM 252

    Organic Chemistry II

    F,S,SS

    3

    CEM 255

    Organic Chemistry Lab

    F,S,SS

    2

    BMB 401

    Biochemistry

    F,S,SS

    4

    BS 162

    Organisms and Populations

    F,S,SS

    4

    BS 172

    Organisms and Populations laboratory

    F,S,SS

    2

     

    TOTAL CREDITS 23

    SEVEN CREDITS OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES:

    ANS 409

    Advancements in Reproduction

    F

    3

    ANS 413

    Monogastric Animal Nutrition

    F

    3

    ANS 435

    Mammary Physiology

    S

    4

    ANS 483

    Ruminant Nutrition

    S

    3

     

    TOTAL CREDITS 7-11

    EIGHT CREDITS OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES: (*required for admission to MSU Veterinary Medicine)

    ANS 305

    Applied Animal Behavior

    S

    3

    ANS 309

    Animal Health Management

    F

    3

    ANS 407

    Food and Animal Toxicology

    F

    3

    ANS 418

    Comprehensive Nutrient Management

    F

    3

    ANS 445

    Equine Exercise Physiology

    F

    4

    ANS 455

    Avian Physiology

    S

    4

    *MMG 301

    Introductory Microbiology

    F,S,SS

    3

    *MMG 302

    Introductory Microbiology Laboratory

    S,SS

    1

    *MMG 409

    Eucaryotic Cell Biology **See Note 1 Below**

    S,SS

    3

    PHM 450

    Introduction to Chemical Toxicology

    S

    3

    *PHY 231

    Introductory Physics I

    F,S, SS

    3

    *PHY 232

    Introductory Physics II

    F,S,SS

    3

    *PHY 251

    Introductory Physics Laboratory I

    F,S,SS

    1

    *PHY 252

    Introductory Physics Laboratory II

    F,S,SS

    1

    ZOL 313

    Animal Behavior

    F,S,SS

    3

    ZOL 341

    Fundamental Genetics (Can replace ANS 314)

     

    4

     

    TOTAL CREDITS 8-15

    ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES:

     

    ANS 492

    Undergraduate Research

    F,S,SS

    3

    ANS 493

    Professional Internship in ANS

    F,S,SS

    3

    Study Abroad

     

     

    6

     

    TOTAL CREDITS 3-6

    **Note 1: These Animal Science courses have been approved to be used in place of MMG 409: ANS 435, ANS 445, and ANS 455 for admission to MSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine.**

    In addition to the concentration requirements, ANS Majors must also complete University, College, and Department requirements.

    Students interested to attend veterinary college must clarify all requirements with advisor or with the college to which they intend to apply. For requirements to apply and for admission into CVM, see text below list of courses. Or, go to website for College of Veterinary Medicine at MSU (http://cvm.msu.edu), then click Prospective DVM Students. 

     

    Animal Industry Concentration

    Animal Industry Concentration is a program for students who aspire to work on a farm or in an agribusiness. This program includes the science core, numerous courses in management of animals, and various electives depending on the goals of each student.

    Specific course requirements for Animal Industry Concentration: 

    ANS 201

    Animal Products

    F

    3

     

    TOTAL CREDITS 3

    ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES:

    CSS 110

    Computer Applications in Agronomy

    F, S, SS

    3

    CSE 101

    Introduction to Computing

    F,S,SS

    3

     

    TOTAL CREDITS 3

    ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES:

    ABM 100

    Decision-making in the Agri-Food System

    F,S

    3

    ABM 130

    Farm Management I

    F

    3

     

    TOTAL CREDITS 3

    ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES in addition to the required species management course from ANS Core for a total of two courses.

    ANS 222

    Introductory Beef Cattle Management

    S

    3

    ANS 232

    Introductory Dairy Cattle Management

    F

    3

    ANS 242

    Introductory Horse Management

    F

    3

    ANS 252

    Introduction to Management of Avian Species

    F odd yr.

    3

    ANS 262

    Introductory Sheep Management

    S

    3

    ANS 272

    Introductory Swine Management

    F

    3

    ANS 282

    Introductory Companion Animal Biology & Mgmt

    F,S

    3

     

    TOTAL CREDITS 3

    ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES

    ANS 422

    Advanced Feedlot Management

    F

    3

    ANS 432

    Advanced Dairy Management

    F

    3

    ANS 442

    Advanced Horse Management

    S

    3

    ANS 472

    Advanced Swine Management

    S  even yr.

    3

     

     

    TOTAL CREDITS 3

    SIX CREDITS OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES

    ANS 211

    Animal and Product Evaluation

    F

    3

    ANS 305

    Applied Animal Behavior

    S

    3

    ANS 309

    Animal Health Management

    F

    3

    ANS 409

    Advancements in Reproduction

    F

    3

    ANS 407

    Food and Animal Toxicology

    F

    3

    ANS 413

    Monogastric Animal Nutrition

    F

    3

    ANS 418

    Comprehensive Nutrient Management

    F

    3

    ANS 435

    Mammary Physiology

    S

    4

    ANS 445

    Equine Exercise Physiology

    F

    4

    ANS 455

    Avian Physiology

    S

    4

    ANS 483

    Ruminant Nutrition

    S

    3

                                                                                                                           TOTAL CREDITS 6-12

    ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES

    ANS 493

    Professional Internship

    F,S,SS

    3

    ANS 300A,B,C,D or E

    Judging

    F

    6

    Study Abroad

     

     

    6

     

     

    TOTAL CREDITS 3-6

    Undergraduate Academic Programs

    Department of Animal Science
    Undergraduate Programs

    Animal Science is very diverse, with species including traditional livestock and various companion animals. Educational opportunities range from management of animals to basic science. Career opportunities include farms, agribusiness, extension, and research. In general, animal science is an application of basic science and welfare management to animals. The extent to which basic science is considered varies widely among people so that professional opportunities from animal science are very numerous. The key is that eventually you know your goal and together we work toward that end.

    The undergraduate program in animal science, which leads to a Bachelor of Science degree, is designed to prepare students for a variety of career opportunities.  Scientific principles of biology and animal agriculture developed from various animal models are an important component of the animal sciences program.  Another important component is the application of animal management procedures in agricultural operations.

    The animal science major provides students much flexibility in meeting their program requirements. Students can benefit most from this flexibility with careful guidance from their academic advisors and career mentors as they plan a program of study consistent with their interests and goals.  To gain the most from advisors, we encourage each student to see their advisor or mentor once per semester to discuss course selection, career objectives, and any other concerns or items beneficial to the student.  

    All students in animal science must complete required core courses involving the disciplines of breeding and genetics, nutrition, physiology, and management.  These principles are taught utilizing swine, horses, poultry, sheep, beef and dair cattle.  Students must also complete one of the four concentrations in animal science.

    Baccalaureate Degree:

    Students may select among four academic concentrations:

    These concentrations are described in detail below.  Each concentration can be completed in less than 120 credits.  So, you must select additional elective course work to reach 120 total credits to graduate. If you are required to take MTH 1825 you will need to complete 123 credits for graduation.

    Specializations with Baccalaureate Degree:

    • Biotechnology
    • Agribusiness Management

    Certificate Programs:

    In addition to baccalaureate programs, the Department of Animal Science in coordination with the Institute of Agricultural Technology offers programs that lead to a certificate. These programs are based in established knowledge but emphasize practical aspects to manage an enterprise and animals.

    Certificate programs are available in:

    • Dairy Management
    • Horse Management
    • Beef Management
    • Swine Management

    Baccalaureate programs:

    From high school your goals may change. So, a selection of a concentration as a freshman may need to change. This is possible and occurs regularly in part because the core of our curriculum is very similar.

    As you progress through college, take various courses, encounter different people, accumulate new experiences and do not hesitate to adjust your original goal. We encourage you to work closely with your advisor. If you wish to change advisors, it is your program, make sure that you are comfortable with your advisor and change if needed or desired.

    In addition to the four opportunities for bachelor degrees, students in animal science may pursue double majors, such as Crop and Soil Science or Business. In the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources there are two Specializations (minors) that can be pursued. These specializations are: Biotechnology and Agribusiness Management and are described below.

    Undergraduate Coordinator for Department of Animal Science:
    Dr. Richard Balander at 517-432-1395 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

    CORE COURSES FOR ALL STUDENTS IN ANIMAL SCIENCE: 2015-2016 

    UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS

     

     

    Course Number

    Course Title

    Semester

    Cr

    WRA

    Writing, Rhetoric & American Culture

    F,S,SS

    4

    IAH*

    Integrative Studies in Arts & Humanities (IAH 201 to 210)

    F,S,SS

    4

    IAH*

    Integrative Studies in Arts & Humanities (IAH 211 or above)

    F,S,SS

    4

    ISS

    Integrative Studies in Social, Behavior & Economic Sci. (ISS-200)

    F,S,SS

    4

    ISS

    Integrative Studies in Social, Behavior & Economic Sci. (ISS-300)

    F,S.SS

    4

    *WRA is a prerequisite for IAH courses.

    TOTAL CREDITS 20

    COLLEGE REQUIREMENTS

    EC 201 or 202

    Economics

    F,S,SS

    3

    MTH 116

    College Algebra & Trigonometry

    F,S,SS

    5

          OR

    MTH 103 and MTH 114, MTH 103 and STT 200 or  STT 201 or MTH 124 or MTH 132

     

     

       

    TOTAL CREDITS 8

    DEPARTMENT REQUIREMENTS (All the courses listed below)

    ANS 101

    Professional Development in Animal Science I

    F,S

    1

    ANS 110

    Introductory Animal Agriculture

    F,S

    4

    ANS 301

    Professional Development in Animal Science II

    F,S

    2

    ANS 313

    Principles of Animal Feeding and Nutrition

    F

    4

    ANS 314

    Genetic Improvement of Farm Animals

    S

    4

    ANS 315

    Anatomy and Physiology of Farm Animals

    S

    4

    ANS 401

    Ethical Issues in Animal Agriculture

    S

    1

    CEM 141

    General Chemistry

    F,S,SS

    4

    CEM 143

    Survey of Organic Chemistry

    F,S,SS

    4

    OR

    CEM 251 Organic Chemistry

    F,S,SS

    3

    BS    161

    Cells and Molecules

    F,S, SS

    3

    BS    171

    Cells and Molecular Biology Laboratory

    F,S,SS

    2

     

    TOTAL CREDITS 32-33

    ONE OF THE FOLLOWING COURSES

    STT 200

    Statistical Methods

    F,S,SS

    3

    STT 201

    Statistical Methods

    F,S,SS

    4

    STT 421

    Statistics I

    F,S,SS

    3

     

     

    TOTAL CREDITS 3

    ONE OF THE FOLLOWING SPECIES MANAGEMENT COURSES

    ANS 222

    Introductory Beef Management

    S

    3

    ANS 232

    Introductory Dairy Management

    F

    3

    ANS 242

    Introductory Horse Management

    F

    3

    ANS 252

    Introductory to Management of Avian Species

    F odd yr.

    3

    ANS 262

    Introductory Sheep Management

    S

    3

    ANS 272

    Introductory Swine Management

    F

    3

    ANS 282

    Companion Animal Biology & Management

    F,S

    3

    For Production Animal Scholars ANS 242 and 282 are excluded.

    TOTAL CREDITS 3

     

    ONE OF THE FOLLOWING CONCENTRATIONS:

    Animal Industry

    25-34

    Animal Biology and Pre-Veterinary Medicine

    39-54

    Companion and Exotic Animal Biology

    41-51

    Production Animal Scholars

    52-55

     

     

    ELECTIVES

    10-29

     

    TOTAL CREDITS 120

    Students must complete the above requirements along with one of the concentrations.

    Concentrations

    Specializations in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources

    Agricultural Technology Certificate Programs

     

     

     

     

    Equipment

    The class currently has a flatbed wagon with a bench seat that we use for driving teams.

     

     

     

    We have a maroon single cart that is used to introduce students to driving.

     

     

     

     

    We have a show wagon on indefinite loan from California State Polytechnic University at Pomona. This wagon is over 100 years old and has been completely restored. It was formerly used by the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Center.

     

     

     

    We have a forecart that has both single shafts or a tongue. We use this for pulling a hay wagon or a drag.

     

     

     

    The horses also have a 100 yr old leather and brass show harness. This team harness was originally part of a larger set used by Pabst Brewing Company in the early 1900’s. The harness was then purchased by Michigan Agricultural College (MAC) and the brass emblems applied to the bridle and hip drops.

     

    Horses

    We currently have 2 Belgians and 3 Percherons. One mare, Greta, and four geldings, Coronel, Lucky, Buck and Bob. The draft horses are used for a driving basics class every fall and spring semester. Each year they help teach 50 students how to harness and drive. We usually drive single, teams, and 3-abreast.

    Lucky

    Lucky, a 21 year old Percheron is on loan to MSU from Opal and John Powers. Lucky has competed in hitches and single carts for many years and is now able to enjoy retirement by teaching students how to drive.

     

     

    Coronel

    Coronel was purchased at a sale in Topeka, IN in the summer of 1999. Coronel is 18.1 h and weighs 2300 lbs.

     

     

    Greta

    West Meadow Greta was donated by Dan Creyts in the fall of 2000. She was in foal at the time and had a filly, MSU Memory, in May of 2001. Greta is 16 years old, 17.3 h and weighs about 1800 lbs.

     

     

    Buck

    Buck, a Percheron, was donated by Dave and Mary Ellen Beck in the fall of 2006. He is 19 years old, 17.3 h and weighs about 2000 lbs.

     

     

     

    Bob

    Bob, a Percheron, was donated by Dave and Mary Ellen Beck in the fall of 2006. He is 19 years old, 17.3 h and weighs about 2000 lbs.

     

     

    Draft Horse Basics:  ANS 141

    This is a 2 credit class available to all students.

    Course Description:  Safe handling, hitching, and driving of draft horses.

    Contact Information:  Cara O’Connor, instructor (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address))

    Course Objectives:

    1. Students will understand the history of draft horses and gain an appreciation of heavy horse conformation.
    2. Students will become familiar with safely handing draft horses.
    3. Students will learn the parts of the harness and equipment used in heavy horse operations.
    4. Students will learn how to properly hitch horses to specific pieces of equipment.
    5. Students will learn how to ground rive horses, drive singly or in a team

    Pictures: 


     

    Fall 2003

     

     

    Spring 2004

    Ground driving3 abreast                                                      

                                                                    Flora on the single cart

    Flora trotting on the single cart.                                       Small Animals Day                 

    Students driving Greta and Coronel on the wagon.

     

    Great Lakes Fall 2007

     

    Class Spring 2008

     

    Endowment

    The Draft Horse Endowment Fund was established by Dr. Russ Erickson in 2000 to preserve the future of the program. The interest generated by the endowment provides 95% of the funding for the class and equipment. This money is used to repair harness parts, purchase new harness and general supplies, and repair vehicles. The endowment ensures the longevity of the program and increases the quality of the students’ experience in the class. Your gift to the MSU Draft Horse Endowment Fund will help ensure the continuity and growth of the draft horse program at MSU. Your investment in these gentle giants will help maintain a link to our agricultural heritage as we educate the next generation of industry leaders.

    Please consider making a donation to the Draft Horse Endowment Fund today.

    To make a secure credit gift on-line, CLICK HERE.

    Gifts can also be mailed to:

    Cara O’Connor
    Michigan State University
    2235 Anthony Hall
    East Lansing, MI  48824
    Phone:  (517) 353-4866

     

    Thank you for supporting the Draft Horse Endowment Fund!


     

    Additional Historical Pictures

     

     

    Preston Wolfe 14607

    Belgian Stallion foaled May 9, 1926
    Sire:  Walther 8489
    Dame:  Elsie Houston 8756

    Placing:

    1926

    International Livestock Show, Chicago

    1. 1st - Foal

    1927

    International Livestock Show, Chicago

    1. 1st place Stallion 3 years and under
    2. Junior Champion Stallion
    3. 1st Futurity Class Yearling Stallion

    Ohio State Fair

    1. 1st Stallion 1 yr and under 2 
    2. Junior Champion Stallion
    3. Grand Champion Stallion

    Indiana State Fair

    1. 1st Stallion 1 yr and under 2
    2. Reserve Junior Champion Stallion

    1928

    International Livestock Show, Chicago

    1. 1st Stallion 2 yr and under 3
    2. Junior Champion Stallion

    Ohio State Fair

    1. 1st Stallion 2 yrs old
    2. Junior Champion Stallion
    3. Reserve Grand Champion Stallion
    4. Champion Stall Bred in Ohio
    5. King Albert Cup

    1929

    International Livestock Show, Chicago

    1. 2nd Stallion 3 yrs and under 4

    Michigan State Fair

    1. 1st Stallion 3 yrs and under 4
    2. Senior Champion Stallion
    3. Grand Champion Stallion

    Ohio State Fair

    1. 1st Stallion 3 yrs and under 4
    2. Senior Champion Stallion
    3. Reserve Grand Champion Stallion

    1930

    International Livestock Show, Chicago

    1. 1st Stallion 1 yr and under 2

    Michigan State Fair

    1. 1st Stallion 4 yrs old
    2. Reserve Senior Champion
    3. Reserve Grand Champion

    Rangeline Phoenix

    Pervenche 9030

    Belgian Mare foaled April 11, 1921
    Sire:  Rubis 8004
    Dame:  Quenea 4887

    Placing:

    1922

    International Livestock Show, Chicago

    1. 1st - Mare 1 year and under 2
    2. 1st - American Bred Yearling
    3. Reserve Junior Champion Mare under 3
    4. American Bred Yearling

    Michigan State Fair

    1. Reserve Junior Champion

    1923

    International Livestock Show, Chicago

    1. Junior Champion Mare under 3
    2. Grand Champion Mare

    Michigan State Fair

    1. Junior Champion Mare

    Ohio State Fair

    1. Belgian Special

    New York State Fair

    1. 1st - 2 yr old Mare
    2. Junior Champion Mare

    1924

    International Livestock Show, Chicago

    1. 1st - Mare 3 year and under
    2. Senior Champion Mare 3 and over
    3. Grand Champion Mare all ages

    Michigan State Fair

    1. Senior Champion Mare
    2. Grand Champion Mare

    1927

    International Livestock Show, Chicago

    1. 1st - Mare 5 years and over
    2. Reserve Senior Champion Mare 3 years and over
    3. Reserve Grand Champion Mare

    Produce:

    Phoevenche 11298 by Range Line Phoenix

    1. Mare
    2. Foaled:  March20, 1925

    Livenche 11847 by Range Line Pheonix

    1. Mare
    2. Foaled:  April 13, 1926

    Ravenche 12218 by Range Line Phoenix

    1. Mare
    2. Foaled:  April 17, 1927

    Ginger’s Pervenche 22933 by Ginger

    1. Mare
    2. Foaled:  June 9, 1937

    Sir Laet 1190277

    Percheron Stallion
    Sire:  Laet 133886
    Dame:  Tozelle 123963

    Background:

    1. Purchased from Watson Butler from Woodside Farms, Columbus, OH
    2. Took the place of Treviso at Michigan State College
    3. Professor R.S. Hudson commented “Sir Laet is without doubt the very best young Percheron stallion in America.  He has size, quality, good feet, legs, and tru Percheron type.”
    4. Booked to breed mares from Iowa, South Dakota, Wisconsin, and many other part of Michigan

    Placing:

    1928

    1. Champion Stallion at International
    2. Champion Stallion at Ohio State Fair

    1929

    1. 1st place Stallion 3 years and under
    2. Champion American Bred Stallion
    3. Champion Senior Stallion
    4. Champion Stallion

    Get:

    Col. Laet 207619 out of Coreen

    1. Stallion
    2. 1932 won 4th place Stallion Foal

    Lateen 210908 out of Coreen

    1. Stallion
    2. 1933 won 3rd place Stallion Foal
    3. 1934 won 3rd place Stallion 1 year and under 2

    Etola 204812 out of Betsy 115604

    1. Mare
    2. Foaled:  May 1, 1930
    3. 1932 won 4th place Mare 2 years and under 3
    4. 1933 won 2nd place Mare 3 years and under 4
    5. 1934 won 4th place Mare 4 years and under 5

    Loet 206422 out of Leola 191002

    1. Mar
    2. Foaled:  March 24, 1931
    3. 1931 won 5th place Filly Foals

    Colet 206643 out of Coreen

    1. Mare
    2. Foaled:  April 4, 1931
    3. 1932 won 5th place Mare 1 year and under 2
    4. 1933 won 7th place Mare 2 years and under 3
    5. 1934 won 2nd place Mare 3 years and under 4

    Reno 206992 out of Sandelm Flossie 185171

    1. Mare
    2. Foaled:  April 21, 1931
    3. 1935 won 2nd place Mare 4 years and under 5
    4. 1936 won 3rd place Mare 5 years and over
    5. 1937 won 2nd place Mare 5 years and over
    6. 1938 won 5th place Mare 5 years and over
    7. 1939 won 4th place Mare 5 years and over

    Cladudaet 207618 out of Dunham’s Claudie 176703

    1. Mare
    2. Foaled:  February 23, 1932
    3. 1932 won 4th place Filly Foal

    Coet 212838 out of Colo 194276

    1. Mare
    2. Foaled:  March 20, 1933
    3. 1935 won 4th place Mare 2 years under 3
    4. 1936 won 6th place Mare 3 years under 4

    Coreenet 213803 out of Coreen

    1. Mare
    2. Foaled:  April 3, 1934
    3. 1935 won 4th place Mare 1 year and under 2

    Other Pictures:

    On theft is Maplegrove Leila and on the right is Sir Laet

    Treviso 144394

    Percheron Stallion
    Sire:  Dragon 5215
    Dame:  Couceorous 948525 (63516)

    Background:

    • Half-brother of Laet 133886
    • 5th in Premier Sire Group for 1928
    • 3rd in 1929 by Special Committee of the Percheron Society of America

    Get:

    Deliala 188301 out of Dorothea 169630

    1. Mare
    2. 1926 won 2nd place Mare 2 years and under 3

    Quenala 188302 out of Queen 29320

    1. Mare
    2. 1926 won 10th place Mare 1 year and under 2

    Grace Anna C.  189634 out of Nellie 112764

    1. Mare
    2. 1927 won 9th place Mare 2 years and under 3
    3. 1928 won 5th place Mare 3 years and under 4

    Colene 191001 out of Coreen 117580

    1. Mare
    2. 1927 won 1st Mare 1 year and under 2
    3. 1928 won 2nd Mare 2 years and under 3
    4. 1929 won Reserve Senior Champion Mare and Reserve Junior Champion Mare
    5. 1930 won 1st Mare 4 years and under 5
    6. 1931 won 3rd Mare 5 years and over

    Colo 194276 out of Coreen

    1. Mare
    2. 1927 won 2nd Filly Foal
    3. 1928 won 3rd Mare 1 year and under 2

    Doritea 199930 out of Dorotheo 169630

    1. Mare
    2. 1930 won 7th Mare 2 years and under 3
    3. 1931 won 5th Mare 3 years and under 4
    4. 1932 won 1st Mare 4 years and under 5
    5. 1933 won 7th Mare 5 years and over

    Claudie 200053 out of Dunham’s Claudia 176703

    1. Mare
    2. 1929 won 4th Filly Foals
    3. 1930 won 4th Mare 1 year and under 2
    4. 1931 won 2nd Mare 2 years and under 3
    5. 1932 won 3rd Mare 2 years and under 4

    Coreen 117580

    Percheron Mare
    Dame:  Glendale Pride 56304

    Background:

    • She was purchased for $225 from J.M. Hicks and Sons of Williamston, MI Fall 1923
    • She was breed to well known stallions:  Treviso and Sir Laet
    • She foaled a number of price winning horses

    Produce:

    Corvisal 188303 by Treviso 144394

    • Stallion
    • 1926 was Furturity Winner at both Ohio State Fair and International 
    • Later sold to Alex Galbraith of Edmonton, Canada for $1,250

    Colene by Sir Laet 190277

    • Mare
    • Foaled:  April 8, 1926
    • 1927 Futurity Winner at both Ohio State Fair and 1st place for Mare 1 year and under 2 at International
    • 1928 won 2nd place Mare 2 years under 3
    • 1929 won 1st place Mare 3 years and under 4, Reserve Senior Champion Mare, and Reserve Junior Champion Mare
    • 1930 won 1st place Mare 4 years and under 5
    • 1931 won 3rd place Mare 5 years and over
    • She produced prize winning mare Mediator’s Colene 232731 and stallion Colen Laet 216073

    Colo 194276 by Treviso

    • Mare
    • Foaled:  April 2, 1927
    • 1927 won 2nd place Filly Foal
    • 1928 won 3rd place Mare 1 year and under 2
    • She produced prize winning mare Coet 212838 

    Coro 197515 by Treviso

    • Mare
    • Foaled:  March 25, 1928 
    • 1928 won 3rd place Filly Foal
    • 1930 won 9th place Mare 2 year and under 3

    Colet 206992 by Sir Laet 192077

    • Mare
    • Foaled:  April 4, 1931
    • 1932 won 5th place Mare 1 year ad under 2
    • 1933 won 7th place Mare 2 years and under 3
    • 1934 won 2nd place Mare 3 years and under 4

    Coreenet 213803 by Sir Laet

    • Mare
    • Foaled:  April 3, 1934
    • 1935 won 4th place Mare 1 year and under 2

    Corvisal 188303 by Treviso

    • Stallion
    • Foaled:  April 7, 1925
    • 1926 won 1st place Stallion 1 year and under 2, Reserve Junior Champion Stallion
    • 1927 won 3rd place Stallion 2 years and under 3

     Chief Laet 209521 by Sir Laet

    • Stallion
    • Foaled:  April 1932
    • 1933 won 2nd place Stallion 1 year and under 2

    Col. Laet 207619 by Sir Laet

    • Stallion
    • 1933 won 4th place Stallion Foal

    Laeteen 210908 by Sir Laet

    • Stallion
    • Foaled:  May 17, 1933
    • 1933 won 3rd place Stallion Foal
    • 1934 won 3rd place Stallion 1 year and under 2

    Pictures:

     

    Daughters of Coreen

     

    Maplegrove Leila

    Percheron Mare foaled April 15, 1919
    Sire:  Lagos 99093
    Dame:  Maplegrove Polly 132537

     

     

    Background:

    • Purchased from J.O Singmaster at a public sale on October 21,1920 for $300
    • First showing was at Michigan State Fair in 1921 where she won a blue ribbon
    • Won 23 championships, 10 Grand Championships

    Produce:

    Leviso 197516

    • Stallion
    • Foaled: April 19, 1928
    • 1928: 2nd Place Stallion foals

    Placings:

    1922

    • International Livestock Show, Chicago
    • Mare 2 years and under 4 years

    1924

    • 1st Place for Mare 5 years and over Reserve Senior Champion Mare

    1925

    • Senior Champion Mare
    • Grand Champion Mare

    1926

    • 1st Place Mare 5 years and over
    • Champion American Bred Mare
    • Senior Champion Mare
    • Grand Champion Mare

    1928

    • 2nd Place Mare 5 years and over
    • Reserve Senior Champion Mare
    • Reserve Grand Champion Mare

    1929

    • 1st Place Mare 5 years and over
    • Senior Champion Mare
    • Grand Champion Mare

     

     

     

    Clydesdales

    The first two Clydesdale mares: Margaret and Queen Thyra

    The first stallion used:  McAlpine

     

    Group of Clydesdale Mares

     

    Draft Horse History at MSU

    The Draft Horse Program at Michigan State was one of the finest in its day. From 1910 to 1930 draft horses competed in 20 state fairs and 8 international competitions winning 211 firsts and 155 championships. This is a phenomenal amount of success and illustrates just how exceptional the breeding program was. Following 1930 the draft horses were still shown, but as tractors slowly became more available the draft horses slowly faded away. Michigan State successfully breed Clydesdales, Percherons, and Belgians. Click here for additional historic pictures

    Clydesdales:

    The Clydesdales were the first breed on the farm and the first breed to leave. The first Clydesdales were purchased in July, 1907. The Clydes were bred and shown successfully, however Michigan farmers were uninterested in the breed and the remainder of the herd was sold following the 1923 International. Some of the known mares are: Margaret, Queen Thyra, Langwater Fair Maid, and Osceola Duchess. Some of the known stallions are: McAlpine, Prince Fortune, Amaryllis, and Langwater Model.

    Percherons:

    Shortly after the arrival of the Clydesdales MSC purchased two pairs of Percheron mares. One of these mares, Arlene, formed the foundation for the Percheron breeding program. In May, 1908 Arlie a filly out of Arlene was the first purebred foal born on the MSC farm. Arlie remained on the farm and was used as a broodmare through the 1930’s. Maplegrove Leila was another Percheron mare who made history by winning 23 championships three of which were at the same International. Another exceptional broodmare was Coreen whose get won substantial prize money at the state fairs and the International.

    Coreen 

                

     

                   Daughters of Coreen with their foals

     

    The most outstanding Percheron sire that MSC stood was Treviso. Although there were many others his performance as a stud was superior. The Percheron Society of America rankings for superior sire Treviso ranked fifth in 1928 and third in 1929. Sir Laet replaced Treviso as the main sire for MSC Percherons in 1929. Sir Laet  was an exceptional sire and was bred to many Treviso daughters. Sir Laet was the popular Percheron sire owned by MSC. In 1929 he was grand champion at the Ohio and Michigan state fairs and at the International. Sir Laet remained at MSC for just over 10 yrs before he was sold.

    Belgians:

    The Belgian breeding program was started much later and it wasn’t until 1918 that the first Belgian mares foaled out on the farm. These mares were imported and became the foundation for Belgian breeding at MSC. These mares produced a number of grand and reserve grand champion horses. Another great mare was Pervenche who was purchased in 1922 and remained at MSC for four years. During her time at MSC she produced three fillies and won a substantial amount of money at shows. There were also a number of other mares including Manitta de Rubis and Naome de Rubis who won many honors for MSC. The first Belgian stallion was Jupiter who was acquired in 1921. Then in 1923 Jupiter was traded for Range Line Phoenix another Belgian stallion. Range Line Phoenix was successful sire. In 1927 Preston Wolfe was purchased as a yearling and went on to win a number of championships. He produced exceptional offspring and eventually replaced Range Line Phoenix as the main sire for MSC.

    Prevenche                                           Preston Wolfe

    After WWII horses were quickly being replaced with tractors. There was no longer a need for them to plow and harvest. The last draft horse show a MSC owned horse competed in was the American Belgian Show in 1946. In that show, Ginger’s Pervenche, a mare by Ginger and out of Pervenche, won championship honors. The draft horses remained at MSU until 1963; however those last 20 years were nowhere near as impressive as the first 30.

    The Return of Draft Horses to Campus:

    In 1963, the last draft horse left the MSU campus and it wasn’t until 36 years later that one returned. In April of 1999, the Stewart family donated a team of Belgian geldings to the Horse Program. Dr. Russ Erickson accepted the responsibility of the draft horses. One of the geldings died from cancer shortly after his arrival so in order to find a replacement Russ journeyed to the Topeka, IN draft horse sale, but couldn’t find a suitable replacement and ended up purchasing a team of Belgian geldings. These geldings, Coronel and Duke, became the cornerstone of the Draft horse Program at MSU. Coronel and Duke help teach ANS 141 Draft Horse Basics and ANS 490 Advanced Draft Horse Driving. In the spring of 2000 two pregnant Belgian mares were donated to MSU by Dan Creyts. Greta and Flora each produced a live filly. Those fillies, named MSU Millennium and MSU Memory, were ground broke and sold as yearlings in the fall of 2002. In the spring of 2002 MSU sponsored a Plow Day and it was the first time in over 40 years that draft horses had plowed on MSU ground. In the spring of 2004, the program sponsored another Plow Day and 18 teams of horses and mules came to plow. We are striving hard to ensure that the Draft Horse Program will continue for years to come.

     

    Coronel and Duke in the MAC harness at the Great Lakes International in October 2000.

     

    Draft Horses

    The Department of Animal Science provides a university level basic draft horse class. The draft horses and students from this class have participated in the MSU Homecoming Parade, Stallion Expo, 4-H Exploration Days, Small Animals Day, Great Lakes International Draft Horse Show, and two international equine conferences.

    The horses at MSU‘s 150th Anniversary Parade.

    Animal Industry Scholarships

    This is a list of organizations and associations that offer equine-related scholarships and/or internship opportunities. If you are interested in an internship with an association that is not listed (or is listed as only offering scholarships) you are encouraged to contact the association, as some internships can be arranged.

    American Horse Publications
    The AHP offers internships, short-courses, and a travel award that allows recipients to attend the AHP annual seminar. At the seminar, students will have the opportunity to meet leading equine publishing professionals and discuss career possibilities during the three days of educational sessions and related activities.
    For more information, contact the AHP at (386) 760-7743, by e-mail at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or by visitng http://www.americanhorsepubs.org/.

    American Morgan Horse Association
    Member Scholarships are available. Internships may also be arranged.
    For more information, contact the AMHA at (802)985-4944 or visit http://www.morganhorse.com/.

    American Paint Horse Association
    Scholarships are available for members.
    Internship opportunities are posted early in the year (January-February).
    For more information, contact the APHA at (817) 834-APHA.

    American Saddlebred Horse Association
    Member Scholarships are available.
    Internships can also be arranged.
    For more information, contact the ASHA at (859) 259-2742.

    American Quarter Horse Association
    Scholarships are offered for members.
    Internships are also available in several departments (marketing, AQHA Journal).
    For more information, contact the AQHA at (806) 376-4811.

    Appaloosa Horse Club
    Member Scholarships are available.
    For more information, contact the ApHC at (208) 882-5578.

    Arabian Horse Association
    Several member Scholarships are available.
    For more information, contact the AHA at (303) 696-4500.

    American Hackney Horse Society
    Member Scholarships are not posted online, but are available.
    For more information, contact the AHHS at (859) 255-2694.

    Harness Horse Youth Foundation
    Foundation offers several scholarships for those who have a interest in harness racing and are pursuing equine and non-equine related degrees ($1,500 - $3,500).
    For more information, contact the HHYF at (317) 867-5877.

    Harness Tracks of America Scholarship Program
    Scholarships are available to children of licensed harness racing breeders, caretakers, drivers, owners, trainers, or young people actively engaged in harness racing. There are six annual recipients that recieve $7,500 each.  For more information, call (520) 529-2525.

    Hoard’s Dairyman provides a listing of scholarships available to youth majoring in agriculture or with a dairy background. Visit http://www.hoards.com/youth/collegescholarships for more informaiton.

    International Buckskin Horse Association
    Member Scholarships are available.
    For more information, contact the IBHA at (219) 552-1013.

    Kentucky Equine Management Internship
    KEMI is a 24 week internship program with full-time farm employment and weekly lectures, as well as many extracurricular activities. Scholarships for this program are also available.

    Michigan Horse Council
    The MHC offers several scholarships each year. There are three scholarships that are given to MSU students who are in the Horse Management/Agricultural Technology track, Bachelor’s degree with equine emphasis, and a DVM student who intends to practice equine medicine in Michigan. These scholarships range in value from $1,500-$2,000.

    MHC also offers 3 scholarships of $1,000 to students who are members of the MHC or members of MHC member organizations (which includes the MSU Rodeo Club). Visit http://www.michiganhorsecouncil.com/mhc_member__scholarships.htm for more information.

    National Cutting Horse Association
    Member Scholarships are given. Information about the scholarships can be found at the NCHA website, under “Youth”.
    An internship opportunity is also available.
    For more information, contact the NCHA at (817) 244-6188.

    National Reining Horse Association
    Member Scholarships are available.
    2 Internships are available, one during the Derby and one during the Futurity.
    For more information, contact the NRHA at (405) 946-7400.

    Palomino Horse Breeders of America
    Member Scholarships are given.
    A summer internship is also available.
    For more information, contact the PBHA at (918) 438-1234.

    Pony of the Americas Club
    Member Scholarships are not posted online, but are available.
    For more information, contact the POAC at (317) 788-0107.

    Pinto Horse Association of America
    Member Scholarships are available.
    For more information, contact the PtHA at (817) 336-7842.

    Tennessee Walking Horse Breeders’ & Exibitors’ Association
    Undergraduate and Graduate Member Scholarships are available.
    For more information, contact the TWHBEA at (931) 359-1574.

    U.S. Harness Writer’s Association
    The Clyde Hirt Memorial Scholarship ($2,500) is given to any North American college student who is knowledgeable about harness racing and interested in a career in journalism.
    For more information, contact USHWA at (732) 249-8500. 

    International Opportunities

    Northern Ireland

    Michigan State University and Department of Agriculture for Northern Ireland have established a student exchange agreement, which includes 5 Northern Ireland Colleges. Students form Enniskillen College of Agriculture and Michigan State University spend on semester taking classes in Michigan or Northern Ireland, respectively. Michigan State students enroll for 12 credits of international course work at Michigan State, but take courses in Northern Ireland. Enniskillen students come to Michigan State University while completing their “year out” (internship), or during the course work portion of their training. Michigan State students have the option of taking courses in equitation, horse farm management, equine facilities, horse science or farm business in Northern Ireland, which will waive requirements or be used as electives at Michigan State. Enniskillen College of Agriculture students take courses in horse farm management, exercise physiology, selection and judging, equitation and horse merchandising. These courses are not used to waive academic requirements in Northern Ireland but rather as part of the “year out” experience required for graduation. Students from both programs live in dormitories and pay room and board to the college or university they are attending. Difference in cost is approximately the price of air-fare and incidentals. In an effort to provide more students with and international understanding of the horse industry, faculty from Michigan State University have traveled to Northern Ireland to to lecture. Lectures on the US horse industry, exercise physiology and nutrition provided Northern Irish students with an exposure to the US horse industry and how it differs from that of Northern Ireland.

    Mexico

    Michigan State University Department of Animal Science has recently completed a visit to Mexico City and Guadalajara to help align internships with several prestigious facilities. The farms work with Andalusian and Aztecas. Opportunities exist for internships geared toward breeding or training and riding.

     

     

    Draft Horse Class

    The Department of Animal Science at Michigan State University currently offers a draft horse class.  This class, ANS 141:  Draft Horse Basics, gives students an introduction to harnessing, hitching, and driving draft horses.  This class is a hands-on class and students will learn to drive a single, team, and three-abreast hitch.  Visit the official page of the MSU Draft Horses to find out more.

    2-Year & 4-Year Horse Management Program

    Academic Programs

    Two-Year Horse Management Program: The Horse Management program is a four semester curriculum that emphasizes both hands-on learning and the understanding of pertinent theory. Students come with a wide variety of goals, from wanting to become trainers and riding instructors to wanting to be show grooms and exercise riders; from students wanting to own their own boarding facilities to ones that want to be employed at breeding farms. The program emphasizes mandatory internships and tailors elective classes to each student’s goals. This program has a limited annual enrollment.

     

    Bachelors of Science: Within the Animal Science major, students can emphasize Science, Agri-Business Management or Pre-Veterinary Medicine. Students have the opportunity to specialize in horses through course work, directed studies and undergraduate research projects. A semester exchange with the Enniskillen College of Agriculture Horse Program provides additional opportunities for those students with an interest in the international horse industry.

    2-Year Horse Management Program

    The U.S. horse industry offers exciting opportunities to students with an enthusiasm for horses and the necessary training in business management and production. That training is exactly what the 16-month Horse Management Program at Michigan State University offers you. While you earn your certificate in Horse Management, you’ll spend three semesters (15-week periods) on the MSU campus and one semester off campus, getting hands-on experience in a professional setting. The Horse Management Program is one of 10 options offered by the Institute of Agriculture Technology.

     

    What will I study?
    On campus, you’ll learn valuable skills and theory from the faculty of Michigan’s land grant university, in teaching facilities that are the best in the state. You’ll sharpen your skills in horse production by taking courses in farm management, nutrition, horse judging, breeding, behavior and training, exercise physiology, and health care. You’ll spend time at the Horse Teaching and Research Facility, working with Michigan State’s herd of Arabian horses. Beyond that, you’ll take courses in business management, economics, farm law and computers that will sharpen your business savvy and put you in a position to get the job you want in the horse industry.

    You’ll have the opportunity to pursue your professional interests off campus, too, through a work experience designed just for you. Whether your interests lie in breeding, racing, training, or other areas of horse management, we"ll help you locate this work experience in or outside of Michigan. You’ll work closely with professionals in the horse industry and gain the hands-on experience you need to round out your classroom studies.

    What kinds of jobs can I get?
    Our graduates deal with the day-to-day care and management of horses and horse facilities. Some are farm or stable managers, and others are division managers for large horse operations. Some become trainers or tack shop owners, and others go on to explore other areas of the horse industry in which they have special interests and skills.

    What kind of preparation do I need?
    Our most successful students enjoy horses and want careers where they can be in contact with horses. They come into the program with a good high school science background, have some experience working with horses and, ideally, have already worked at a horse farm and understand the commitment involved.

    Admission to the Horse Management Program at Michigan State University requires that you have a high school diploma.

    4-Year Horse Management Program

    The Department of Animal Science at Michigan State University has ongoing equine programs in teaching, research, and extension. The baccalaureate program offers a course of study culminating in a bachelor’s degree in Animal Science, with an equine emphasis.

    The baccalaureate program in Animal Science at Michigan State University offers an exciting and innovative Equine option. The goals of the Animal Science program is to prepare students for management level positions.The B.S. also provides students with the background necessary to work in fields such as sales and marketing, and with industry associations. Students take courses on campus for four years, and professional internships are strongly encouraged. Courses in the Animal Science program emphasize nutrition, physiology (exercise and reproductive), marketing and management. Students also take courses in equine behavior, horsemanship, and training.

    2-Yr & 4-Yr Contacts

    For more information on Animal Science-Equine Emphasis programs contact:

    4-Yr
    Dr. John Shelle
    Director of Horse Programs
    Department of Animal Science
    474 S. Shaw Lane, Rm. 1250A
    Michigan State University
    East Lansing, MI 48824-1225
    (517) 355-8391 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    2-Yr
    Camie Heleski
    2-Yr Horse Management Program Coordinator
    Department of Animal Science
    474 S. Shaw Lane, Rm 1250G
    East Lansing, MI  48824-1225
    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or (517) 355-8427

     


     


     

     

     

    Awards & Honors

    The faculty, staff, and students in the Department of Animal Science frequently achieve noteworthy accomplishments in the pursuit of academic excellence.  Those awards can be in recognition of excellence in teaching, research, and outreach. 

    To see what the recent awards are for Faculty, Staff and Students, just click on a link to the left.

    Emergency & Safety

    Emergency Evacuation

    When the fire alarms sound, please evacuate the building immediately. Follow the directions of emergency team members in yellow hard hats, cross to the other side of the street and assemble at one of the two rally points located either:

    1. In the faculty/staff parking lot NORTH of the building, or
    2. EAST of Anthony Hall near the NORTHWEST corner of Farrall Hall.

    DO NOT GATHER IN THE PARKING AREA IMMEDIATELY SOUTH OF ANTHONY HALL. IN THE EVENT OF A REAL EMERGENCY YOU COULD BECOME TRAPPED THERE. IF YOU FIND YOURSELF IN THIS AREA DURING AN EMERGENCY, GO AROUND THE SOUTH END OF ANTHONY HALL TO RALLY POINT B.

    If you are personally aware of why the alarms sounded, please report the details of the incident to one of the emergency team members when you reach the rally point.

    Do not re-enter Anthony Hall until the all clear is given by the East Lansing Fire Department or the MSU Department of Police & Public Safety. In the event of bad weather you will be directed by the emergency team to seek shelter in either the MSU International Center or in Farrall Hall.  

     

    Laboratory Safety

    Be Prepared Web Portal (MSU University Relations)

    Office of Radiation, Chemical and Biological Safety (ORBCS)

    Safety Resources for MSU Researchers (Office of VP for Research & Grad. Studies)

     

    Horse Teaching and Research Center

    Farm Manager:
    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) (517) 355-7484

    Faculty Coordinator
    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    Location
    3327 Collins Rd.
    Lansing, MI 48910

    MSU boasts one of the oldest continuous Arabian horse breeding programs in the United States. The primary mission of the HTRC is to educate the next generation of Michigan horse persons and solve industry problems through applied scientific research. It has always been the philosophy at MSU to maintain the highest quality livestock on our farms for those purposes. If students learn on average livestock then mediocrity soon becomes the acceptable norm.   The Horse Farm is open 8-4:30 daily. Click for more information about the Horse Teaching and Research Center.

    Electronic Forms

    NOTE: Unless otherwise indicated, all forms accessible from this page are in pdf format.

    Controller’s Office:

    Animal Use

    • Animal Science has a new electronic Animal Use Form.  Please do not use the old paper version any longer, unless you are revising a previous paper Animal Use Form.  If that is the case, please .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) Faye and she will send you the paper form.  With the new electronic form, it routes itself to the necessary individuals. Go to the Animal Science Animal Use Form site and log in with your netid.   If you have any questions, please contact Sandy Bailey (5-8430).  Thanks.
    • Institutional Animal Care & Use Committee (IACUC) forms

    Farm Training (MS Word Version)

    Office of Intellectual Property: forms and brochures

    Empoyee Termination Checklist: MS Word, pdf

    Human Resources: On-line forms

     

    How to Access Required Animal Care and Use Training Materials

    All MSU employees involved in animal care and use need to take and complete the following Institutional Animal Care & Use Committee (IACUC) and the Office of Radiation, Chemical and Biological Safety (ORCBS) trainings. These trainings are available as online tutorials on the web. Upon completion of each tutorial you must fill in and submit a completed web registration form to register your training in the training database. You should also print a copy as a backup record and insurance against computer glitches.

    You must complete the 3 required training tutorials listed below. Optional training is for additional information. Instructions are provided for each tutorial.

    1. IACUC Training (Required)

    • Click this link to begin: Required Online Tutorial
    • Click NEXT to continue

    Fill in and submit the Web Training Registration Form, print the certificate, and turn in a copy to your supervisor for your required training record.

    2. Species Specific Training (Required)

    • Click this link to begin: List of Trainings
    • Click on the species specific training tutorial for the animals you will be working with (Cattle, Horses, Poultry, Sheep and Goats, etc.).

    Fill in and submit the Web Training Registration Form, print the certificate, and turn in a copy to your supervisor for your required training record.

    3. Biosafety Training for Animal Users (Required)

    • Click this link to begin: Biosafety Training for Animal Users
    • Click on Enter Biosafety Principles Training Course

    Fill in and submit the Web Training Registration Form, print the certificate, and turn in a copy in to your supervisor for your required training record.

    4. Occupational Safety for Animal Handlers (Optional)

    This explains MSU‘s medical monitoring program for employees working with or around animals or with unfixed animal tissue, and covers general occupational health and safety concerns.

    • Click this link to begin: Occupational Safety for Animal Users
    • Click on Begin Course

    Fill in and submit the Web Training Registration Form, print the certificate, and turn in a copy to your supervisor for your required training record.

    These and other trainings can be found at http://www.iacuc.msu.edu under Training.

    Web-based Farm Safety Training

    This page is intended as an aid to direct individuals to training or information currently available on the World Wide Web. It does not represent all trainings that may be needed. The Farm Manager may also have alternate trainings in lieu of those listed here.

    Right-To-Know

    • Non laboratory use of hazardous chemicals

    Safety Procedures for

    Safety and Operating Procedures for

    Additional trainings and detailed information are available at the ORCBS web site.  

    ANS Graduate Directory

    Animal Science Graduate Students FS14

    Name

    Email

    Degr

    Advisor

    Albornoz, Rodrigo

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    PHD

    Michael Allen

    Atkin, Monica

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    MS

    Steven Rust

    Camsari, Cagri

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    PHD

    George Smith

    Capelari, Matheus

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

     PHD

    Wendy Powers

    Carrasquillo-Mangual, Martin

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

     MS

    Michael VandeHaar

    Casiro, Sebastian

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

     MS

    Juan Steibel

    Chamberlin, David

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

     MS

    Nathalie Trottier

    Chen, Chunyu

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    PHD

    Robert Tempelman

    De Souza, Jonas

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

     PHD

    Adam Lock

    DeVries, Jennifer

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    MS

    Nathalie Trottier

    Foster, Tristan

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    MS

    Daniel Buskirk

    Garver, Joshua

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

     MS

    Adam Lock

    Gualdron Duarte, Laura 

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  

    PHD

    Michael Allen 

    Kennedy, Katherine

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    PHD

    Michael Allen

    Latack, Brooke

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

     MS

    Wendy Powers

    Leszcz, Joseph 

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    MS 

    Darrin Karcher

    Liu, Enhong

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    PHD

    Michael VandeHaar

    Lu, Yongfang (Sarah) 

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    PHD

    Rob Tempelman 

    Maldini, Gabriela

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    PHD

    Michael Allen

    Manandhar, Srijana

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

     MS

    J. Richard Pursley

    Martin, Rachel

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

     PHD

    Jason Rowntree

    Martins, Joao, Paulo

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    MS

    J. Richard Pursley

    Montiel-Olguin, Luis

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    PHD

    George Smith

    O’Malley, Carly

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

     PHD

    Janice Siegford

    Perry, Kaitlyn

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    PHD

    Cathy Ernst

    Regmi, Prafulla       

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    PHD

    Darrin Karcher 

    Schmidt, Sarah

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    PHD

    Adam Lock

    Shire, Jessica 

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) 

    MS

    David Beede 

    Souza, Rodrigo

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

     PHD

    Michael VandeHaar 

    Sun, Yan (Amy)

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    PHD

    Adam Lock

    Velez, Deborah 

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    PHD

    Cathy Ernst

    Wurtz, Kaitlin

    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    MS

    Janice Siegford/Juan Steibel

    Useful Links

    Listed are some links to websites within the MSU system that are useful:

    Admissions Office

    Graduate School

    Information about I-9 Employment Form 

    Office for International Students and Scholars

    Registrar’s Office

    Departmental Grievance Procedure

    Graduate Student Organizations

    Animal Science Graduate Student Association (ASGSA)
    The ASGSA is open to all MSU graduate students registered in the Department of Animal Science. The objectives of the organization are to establish communication among graduate students and create channels of communication with the faculty and other parts of the university; and promote the academic, economic and social aims of both the Department of Animal Science and its graduate students. ASGSA has business meetings once a month during the academic year and sponsors a variety of social and professional activities over the course of the year.

    2014-15 Officers:
       President - Yan (Amy) Sun - Department Advisory Committee Rep - .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
       Vice President - Joe Leszcz - COGS Rep - .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) 
       Secretary - Kaitlyn Perry- Graduate Student Affairs Committee Rep - .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) 
       Treasurer - Kaitlyn Wurtz - .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    2014-15 Activities:

    Graduate Research Forum - October 23, 2014
    Other events will be announced as planned
        

    Council of Graduate Students (COGS)
    COGS is the official graduate student organization at Michigan State University with each department having a voting representative. The primary objective of COGS is improvement of the academic, social and economic position of graduate students at MSU. The organization has official delegates to the Graduate Council, the Academic Council and standing committees thereof, and several all-university and presidential committees. Through membership in these other bodies, COGS participates in decisions on such matters as tuition and fees, the grading system, traffic regulations, academic and extracurricular programs of the university, graduate assistant stipends, improvements in on- and off-campus student living conditions, academic freedom and responsibilities, student representation in university government and the selection of principal administrative officers.

    Animal Science 2014-15 COGS Representative is Joe Leszcz.

     

     

     

     

    Events

    Purchase Items

    The following items are available for purchase from the MSU Animal Science department.

    Spartan Dairy Ration Evaluator/Balancer

    Spartan Dairy 3 is a Windows-based, stand-alone computer program for use in evaluating and formulating diets for dairy cattle.  It was designed to formulate reasonable diets in a relatively short period of time using the latest science…(more).

    Animal Science Events

    Breeds of Beef and Multi-Purpose Cattle

    Dr. Harlan Ritchie recently finishing writing a book entitled “Breeds of Beef and Multi-Purpose Cattle.”  Rather than publishing it in hardcopy, he chose to distribute it on this website so that it can be accessed by anyone interested in the subject. Please consider a $25 donation to the Beef Cattle Education Endowment Fund.

    Download Breeds of Beef and Multi-Purpose Cattle.

    The Beef Cattle Education Endowment Fund focuses on enhancing support for the excellent educational opportunities afforded to students in the MSU beef cattle program, as well as provide a sustained source of funds for MSU’s beef research and teaching facilities, including the Purebred Beef Cow-Calf Teaching and Research Center, and the Beef Cattle Teaching and Research Center. For an informational brochure please click here.

    History of DHIA in America

    “DHIA in America - A Foundation for Progress” is a 35-minute Ken Burns style (PBS) documentary DVD that delves into the status of the dairy industry at the turn of the 20th century leading to the development of Cow-Testing Associations—DHIA (Dairy Herd Improvement Associations) as we know them today. The 1st DHIA Association in America was started in Newaygo County, Michigan in 1905. Since then, DHIA has been one of the cogs to provide great strides in the U.S. dairy industry. This documentary was created to capture the 100-year history of cow-testing in America. Over 200 photos included.  For an informational brochure about the DVD or an order form contact Ted Ferris.

    Endowments

    Endowments to the Department provide perpetual funds for student scholarships, graduate fellowships, and programs. By establishing an endowed fund, you can make an impact that can last for generations.

    By virtue of being endowed, these funds provide a consistent level of support, in inflation-adjusted dollars, in perpetuity. The University invests the principal of the endowed funds and uses only the investment income for your specified purposes.

    NOTE: selecting a link to an endowment opens a separate window allowing you to donate directly to that endowment online.

    Donate to an Existing Animal Science Endowment

    Michigan Livestock Industry Scholarship
    Gift code: A10501

    Used to assist worthy student at Michigan State University who plan careers in the livestock industry. The fund also provides means of honoring outstanding individuals, living or deceased, who have performed distinguished services for the livestock industry of Michigan.

    Donate to Michigan Livestock Industry Scholarship

    Poultry Enrichment—Schaible Memorial
    Gift code: A10500

    Awarded to graduate students who are specializing in poultry/fur bearing animals. Exhibited outstanding leadership ability and maintain an acceptable grade point average.

    Donate to Schaible Memorial

    Michigan Dairy Memorial
    Gift code: A10901

    Provides scholarships and specific financial aid to students in the fields of dairy husbandry, and/or processing or manufacturing of dairy products.

    Donate to Michigan Dairy Memorial

    Charles E. Wilson
    Gift code: A10513

    Scholarship or post-graduate work in studies of animal breeding, especially hybrid crosses, and animal diseases, particularly those that are hereditary.

    Donate to Charles E. Wilson Memorial

    J.W. Thomas Enrichment
    Gift code: A10505

    To provide support to Dairy Nutrition graduate students attendance at conferences or meetings (not ADSA or ASAS meetings), visits/interactions with off-campus scientists.

    Donate to J.W. Thomas Enrichment

    Richard and Dana Balander Endowed Fund in Avian Species
    Gift code: A1050

    Scholarship to be given to honor and encourage students to pursue a career in Avian Species. To support specific research project(s) in the Avian Species studies.

    Donate to Balander Avian Species Endowment Fund

    Ron Nelson Judging Team
    Gift code: A10512

    To provide support and supplement Department funds for activities of the Intercollegiate Judging Teams within the Department of Animal Science. Intended to support fall semester competition of livestock, meat, dairy, and horse activities. Also support for Academic Quadrathalon Teams.

    Donate to Ron Nelson Judging Team Fund

    Harold and Carol Hafs Graduate Enrichment
    Gift code: A1055

    To Encourage academic excellence by giving graduate students in the Department of Animal Science unique educational opportunities. Funds can be used for assistantships, enrichment, and intensification of training and special meetings and workshops.

    Donate to Hafs Graduate Enrichment Fund

    G.R. Hartsough Endowed Scholarship in Fur Animal Studies
    Gift code: A10515

    Scholarship to honor and encourage MSU students with declared majors which can be linked to the Fur Animal Industry. Students involved in the following colleges are eligible for this award: College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, College of Veterinary Medicine and College of Natural Resources.

    Donate to Hartsough Endowed Scholarship Fund

    Equestrian Team Endowed Fund
    Gift code: A1053

    General support for the MSU Equestrian Team.

    Donate to Equestrian Team Fund

    Harold A. Henneman Sheep Research Endowment Fund
    Gift code: A10524

    Fund sheep research projects in the Department of Animal Science.

    Donate to Henneman Sheep Research Fund

    GC and Gwendolyn Graf Memorial Student Enhancement
    Gift code: A10527

    Promote undergraduate student involvement in dairy research opportunities.

    Donate to Graf Memorial Student Enhancement Fund

    Reginald A. Emmert Scholarship
    Gift code: A10031

    To honor and encourage full-time, undergraduate students majoring in livestock production or plantation forestry.

    Donate to Reginald Emmert Scholarship

    Jacob (Jake) A. Hoefer Endowed Fellowship
    Gift code: A10528

    Fellowship for Ph.D. candidates in Animal Science.

    Donate to Jacob Hoefer Endowed Fellowship

    Clinton E. Meadows Endowed Chair
    Gift code: A10914

    In support of the Endowed Chair in Dairy Management    

    Donate to Meadows Endowed Chair Fund

    Pierce Halbert Memorial Scholarship
    Gift code: A10531

    Dairy Farm Management travel

    Donate to Pierce Halbert Memorial Scholarship

    Rodeo Club Scholarship
    Gift code: A10542

    Rodeo Club Member

    Donate to Rodeo Club Scholarship

    Roger and Marjorie Mellenberger Dairy Associates Program Enhancement
    Gift code: A10542

    To support and encourage undergrad in Dairy Assoc. Program

    Donate to Mellenberger Dairy Association Fund

    Beef Cattle Education
    Gift code: A105506

    To support beef teaching program and facilities (beef cattle, embryos and semen)

    Donate to Beef Cattle Education Fund

    MI Horse Council
    Gift code: A105092

    To support scholarships related to equine industry first, other expenditures

    Donate to MI Horse Council Fund

    Tucker Lectureship
    Gift code: A10558

    To support Lecture Series, travel, honorarium, printing of brochures

    Donate to Tucker Lectureship Fund

    Elwood Kirkpatrick Dairy Science
    Gift code: A105582

    To fund research and educational programs that lead to scientific advancement in the dairy industry.  To carry out the mission of the AAI.

    Donate to Elwood Kirkpatrick Dairy Science Fund

    The Draft Horse Endowment
    Gift code: A10536
     

    The Draft Horse Endowment Fund was established by Dr. Russ Erickson in 2000 to preserve the future of the program. The interest generated by the endowment provides 95% of the funding for the class and equipment. This money is used to repair harness parts, purchase new harness and general supplies, and repair vehicles. The endowment ensures the longevity of the program and increases the quality of the students’ experience in the class. Your gift to the MSU Draft Horse Endowment Fund will help ensure the continuity and growth of the draft horse program at MSU. Your investment in these gentle giants will help maintain a link to our agricultural heritage as we educate the next generation of industry leaders.

    Donate to the Draft Horse Endowment

    Preservation of Arabian Horses Endowed Fund
    Gift code:  A105504

    To provide continued support for the Arabian breeding program at MSU. It is the third longest continuous Arabian Breeding program in the US.

    Donate to the Preservation of Arabian Horses Endowed Fund

     

    Animal Science Funding Priorities

    The Department of Animal Science has the following funding priorities:

    Academic Program Endowments

    To enhance existing programs such as the Dairy Associates, Draft Horse, and Equine programs.

    • Equine Program Endowment

      $5 million is needed to establish an endowment to support programmatic efforts in curriculum, student enhancement opportunities (such as field trips and visiting lecturers), travel funds to enable students to participate in industry meetings, undergraduate research funds and funds to maintain high quality farm operations on campus.

      Requested funding: $5,000,000

     

    • Dairy Associates Program Endowment

      The Dairy Associates program needs an endowment of $1million for programmatic enhancement of undergraduate research opportunities, developing a global perspective in the program and for industry involvement to further their education.

      Requested funding: $1,000,000

     

    • Dairy Program Endowment

      The Dairy program needs an endowment of $1million to strengthen curriculum, student enhancement opportunities such as field trips, industry involvement and undergraduate research opportunities, visiting lecturers and maintain high quality of farms to support programmatic efforts.

      Requested funding: $1,000,000

     

    • Beef Program Endowment

      The Beef program needs an endowment of $1million to strengthen curriculum, student enhancement opportunities such as field trips, industry involvement and undergraduate research opportunities, visiting lecturers and maintain high quality of farms to support programmatic efforts.

      Requested funding: $1,000,000

     

    • Swine Program Endowment

      The Swine program needs an endowment of $1million to strengthen curriculum, student enhancement opportunities such as field trips, industry involvement and undergraduate research opportunities, visiting lecturers and maintain high quality of farms to support programmatic efforts.


      Requested funding: $1,000,000

     

    • Poultry Program Endowment

      The Poultry program needs an endowment of $1million to strengthen curriculum, student enhancement opportunities such as field trips, industry involvement and undergraduate research opportunities, visiting lecturers and maintain high quality of farms to support programmatic efforts.

      Requested funding: $1,000,000

    International Animal Welfare Studies Endowment

    This endowment would fund an international forum to enhance animal welfare through scientific studies.

    Requested funding: $2,000,000

    Endowed Visiting Professorship

    A Visiting Professorship program is needed to provide students, faculty members and professional staff fresh perspectives on the animal industry. Outstanding faculty and industry personnel filling this position on a short-term basis would interact with undergraduate and graduate students, faculty members and industry representatives, and bring innovative research and teaching techniques, different philosophical perspectives and a global view to the department. This will enable faculty members and students to interact and collaborate with faculty beyond MSU and provide the vision necessary to assure the program continues to meet the needs of the industry.

    Requested funding: $1,000,000

    Endowed Graduate Fellowships

    Encourages excellence by giving graduate students unique educational experiences. Funds would be used for enrichment and intensification of training, to attend special meetings and workshops, assistantships for outstanding graduate students, and to bring seminar speakers to campus. Varying levels of endowments are needed from $50,000 to $1,000,000.

    Requested funding: $50,000 to $1,000,000

    Endowed Scholarships

    Ten student scholarships of $30,000 each are needed for tuition and study abroad opportunities.

    Requested funding: $30,000 to $300,000

    Visiting Lectureship Endowment

    Endowing a Visiting Lecturer position would enable the department to bring outstanding speakers and lecturer to campus to present seminars to students and faculty and to also consult with the animal industries in the state.

    Requested funding: $150,000

    Student Housing at Dairy Teaching and
    Research Center

    The MSU Dairy Teaching and Research Center provides an excellent opportunity for MSU students with a dairy interest to acquire valuable hands-on experience in dairy cattle management. To provide sufficient and safe housing for four student employees, a new duplex to house both male and female students is proposed which ill house the students away from the animals.

    Requested funding: $150,000

     

    Give to Animal Science

    Alumni and friends of the Department of Animal Science provide support in many ways. They have realized the satisfaction provided by supporting the education, research and outreach goals of the Department. As traditional funding sources continue to decline, the need for private support is greater than ever.

    Financial contributions of many friends of Animal Science scholarships, programs, and endowments help support the Department. We have several funding opportunities so alumni and friends can help support specific areas of interest.

    Regulatory Requirements

    Live Animals

    MSU policy requires that the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) review every project involving living vertebrates for appropriateness before the use of these animals begins. Principal investigators or project directors must obtain approval from the IACUC before initiating any research, testing, or institutional project involving the use of vertebrate animals. Graduate students whose thesis or dissertation includes research involving vertebrate animals must provide the Graduate School with the approval number and a copy of the IACUC approval letter. (Appendix A-11 of the Department of Animal Science Graduate Student Handbook)

    For more information on proper procedures for conducting research on animals at MSU please refer to the IACUC website.

    Human Subjects

    As with the use of animals, prior to the activity beginning, any use of human subjects in research, which includes surveys and telephone interviews, must be approved by an Institutional Review Board (IRB), which, at Michigan State University, is the Human Research Protection Program (HRPP). Graduate students whose thesis/dissertation includes research involving human subjects must provide the Graduate School with the approval number and a copy of the IRB approval letter. (Appendix A-11 of the Department of Animal Science Graduate Student Handbook)

    For more information on proper procedure for conducting research (including surveys) using human subjects please refer to the HRPP website.

    Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR)

    All respected graduate programs address aspects of responsible and ethical conduct of research and scholarly/creative activities in their curricula. To reinforce this, some funding agencies are requiring appropriate training and oversight in the responsible and ethical conduct of research for all students and postdoctoral researchers. The Animal Science Department has a plan in place to meet this expectation. Please review the RCRPlan-ANS2013.pdf and also the MSU_Institutional_Policy_for_Training_and_Oversight_in-the_Responsible_and_Ethical_Conduct_of_Research.pdf

    Back to top 

    Animal Event Requirements

    Contract Requirements for Events Involving the
    Use of Animals at Michigan State University Facilities

    Preamble

    Michigan State University recognizes and embraces the fundamental interdependence of humans and animals and is committed to the core value of humane care and use of all animals.

    Animal-related activities are an integral part of MSU’s teaching, research and outreach missions and help MSU advance the quality of life for people and animals. Moreover, as a land-grant university, MSU regularly makes its facilities available to individuals and groups from outside the University community who wish to use these facilities for exhibitions, competitions, and other events involving animals. MSU takes great pride in the excellent care and respect received by animals in its care and expects the same commitment to animal welfare from others using MSU’s facilities.

    MSU is accredited by the Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care (AAALAC), a highly regarded independent reviewer of animal care programs. MSU faculty and staff implement humane care and management practices for animals in compliance with USDA regulations promulgated under the Animal Welfare Act, the Public Health Service Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, and the Guide for the Care and Use of Agricultural Animals in Agricultural Research and Teaching. MSU has established an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) in accordance with USDA regulations, and MSU abides by the care and management practices approved by the IACUC.

    Contract Requirements

    For the reasons set forth in the Preamble, it is important that MSU establish baseline requirements to protect animals in events that take place at MSU when third parties contract for the use of MSU facilities. When MSU makes its facilities available to third parties for events involving animals, one of its primary objectives will be to ensure that appropriate veterinary care is provided to those animals. Therefore, contracts for such events will provide that the individual or entity contracting with MSU for the use of its facilities must either have a veterinarian present at the event or have a written plan for appropriate and timely veterinary care during the event for any animal utilized at the event. Those who contract for the use of MSU facilities for events utilizing USDA-regulated animals will be required to furnish evidence of a USDA license(s), documentation of routine veterinary care, the name of the accompanying staff veterinarian or the USDA-required Program of Veterinary Care, and upon request, USDA Inspection Reports.

    Contact:
       JR Haywood, Interim Assistant Vice President for Regulatory Affairs
       204 Olds Hall
       Phone: 432-4500
       Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

     

    Graduate Research Forum

    The Animal Science Graduate Research Forum is a venue for graduate students to present their research projects to the Department, College, and University communities.The Forum is coordinated entirely by a committee of Animal Science graduate students and a faculty advisor. The Forum consists of oral and poster presentations sessions with research projects presented varying from those in the beginning phase to those in the final phase. The students value the opportunity the Forum gives them to gain experience in oral presentation and poster production, and the audience appreciates the opportunity to listen to these bright individuals.

    ********** 2014 Graduate Research Forum**********

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    Interdisciplinary Options

    Environmental Toxicology

    If you are interested in more advanced toxicology graduate education and research related to the harmful health effects of environmental or other chemicals, you can enroll in a multidisciplinary dual-Ph.D. program in Environmental and Integrative Toxicological Sciences (EITS). The EITS program is administered through MSU‘s Center for Integrative Toxicology (CIT) and, in conjunction with our graduate program, offers outstanding training in basic biomedical science coupled with training and credentials in the discipline of toxicology that can open additional career opportunities. Before enrolling in this program, students must first be accepted for graduate study in a cooperating program such as animal science.

    To find out more about this cooperating program, visit the CIT’s graduate programs in toxicology website, call 517-353-6469, or e-mail .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

     Food Safety

    The graduate specialization in food safety is designed for students who are interested in enhancing the focus of their study on food safety to help societal problems. The specialization is available to students enrolled in a Master’s degree program. For further information see the MSU National Food Safety & Toxicology Center website.

    CANR Certificate in College Teaching

    The MSU Certification in College Teaching Program (CCTP) is an initiative of the Graduate School in partnership with departments and colleges. The program is designed to assist and prepare graduate students interested in entering academia or other professional programs where communication of ideas is required. The program includes course work, attendance to workshops and seminars, mentored teaching experience and the creation of a teaching portfolio to showcase the participant’s teaching philosophy and pedagogical growth.

    Other Interdisciplinary Options at MSU...

    Michigan Dairy Memorial Scholarship

    The Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation, Inc. was established on August 17, 1957. The purpose of the organization shall be “The collection, administration, and investment of funds donated by any person(s), firm(s), or corporation(s), wishing: (1) to recognize various groups and/or organizations, (2) to honor members of the dairy and allied industries (living or deceased) who have performed distinguished services for the dairy industry of Michigan, (3) to provide scholarships for specific financial aid to worthy undergraduates desiring to acquire technical and/or academic training in the fields of dairy science, and/or processing or manufacturing of dairy products through regular four-year college courses, short courses, and/or such technical training as dairy plant engineering or such other courses as the Board of Directors deems advisable, and (4) to support specific educational programs enhancing the curriculum for students with a dairy interest.”

    The Michigan Dairy Memorial Scholarship Fund is the largest scholarship program in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

    THE GOAL

    The Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation needs your financial support. Through your gifts, students pursuing careers in the dairy industry receive scholarships at Michigan State University. These bright, young new leaders and fresh ideas to help meet the challenges our industry will face in years to come.

    ENDOWMENT BENEFITS

    The Foundation’s endowment was established through contributions make in honor of individuals who have served this great industry. In turn, income from this endowment creates scholarships that support deserving students who want to pursue careers in the dairy industry.

    Students who receive the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation awards come from all areas of Michigan. Many come from dairy farms. They have a strong interest in the dairy industry and major in various College of Agriculture and Natural Resources programs including Food Science and Human Nutrition or Animal Science. Active both in and out of the classroom, they often take on leadership roles in the Food Science Club or the Dairy Science Club at MSU.

    In addition to demonstrated academic performance and strong leadership skills, scholarship winners show a deep commitment to community involvement.

    Scholarship recipients receive financial support for up to 15 credits per semester. All undergraduate students planning a career in the dairy industry are eligible.

    WHY INVEST IN STUDENTS?

    Michigan’s dairy industry is the largest and most profitable segment of the state’s agricultural industry. Much of the credit for this success goes to the hard work of those on the farms and in processing, manufacturing and marketing. They have been willing to put into practice ideas, techniques and theories developed by bright, young, innovative people entering the dairy industry every year. Many of these young people receive their education and experience at Michigan State University.

    The Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation wants to ensure that the best and the brightest continue to enter our industry. Providing scholarships for tuition so that young people can attend Michigan State University to prepare for a dairy industry career is perhaps the best investment we can make in our future.

    DONOR RECOGNITION

    Through appropriate support, the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation honors donors in one of the following ways:

    Foundation honorees
    When $1,000 or more is given to recognize and honor a dairy leader, that individual will become a Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation Honoree and will receive appropriate recognition by the Foundation. A plaque with the Honoree’s picture will be permanently installed in the Pavilionat Michigan State University, and the Honoree’s name will be permanently inscribed on a plaque in Anthony Hall.

    Named Scholarships
    Scholarships may be named for an individual or organization with a minimum gift of $30,000. A named scholarship is awarded as part of the Michigan Dairy Memorial and Scholarship Foundation program and carries the name of the individual or organization that provides the funds.

     

    SCHOLARSHIPS
    Applications are available below and are due September 27 (Freshman, Ag Tech, Veterinary), February 28 (New or Renewal for 4-year program) or April 1 (Barnes International Scholarships).

    • $1,500 for fall semester to freshmen in Ag Tech or 4-year program
    • $2,000 for fall semester to Ag Tech students
    • $3,500 over two semesters to students in a 4-year program (new or renewal)
    • Glenn and Anne Lake Scholarship - $7,500 over two semesters
    • Russel Erickson Scholarship - $5,000 over two semesters
    • Donald and Valera Murray Scholarship - $4,000 over two semesters
    • Harold and Lillian Gremel Scholarship - $3,500 for a Production Animal Scholar in veterinary school
    • Red and Edna Cotter Purina Memorial Scholarship - $4,000 for a Production Animal Scholar in veterinary school
    • John and Barbara Dilland Scholarship - $3,500 for a student with a major in Agribusiness Management
    • Jack and Betty Barnes International Scholarship - three $1,000 scholarships for students planning an international experience
    • Archie Studer Scholarship - $3,500 over two semesters for student with interest in dairy breeding or production
    • Nick Bellows Scholarship - $3,500 over two semesters for student with interest in dairy promotion
    • Velmar Green Scholarship - $3,500 for a second-year student in the Dairy Management Program of the Institute of Agricultural Technology

    NEWSLETTERS

    FORMS

    BIOGRAPHIES

     

     

    Equine Programs

    Academic Programs

    Horse Management Agricultural Technology Certificate
    The two-year Horse Management program is a four semester curriculum that emphasizes both hands-on learning and the understanding of pertinent theory. Students come with a wide variety of goals, from wanting to become trainers and riding instructors to wanting to be show grooms and exercise riders; from students wanting to own their own boarding facilities to ones that want to be employed at breeding farms. The program emphasizes mandatory internships and tailors elective classes to each student’s goals. This program has a limited annual enrollment.

    Bachelors of Science Degree
    Within the Animal Science major, students can select a concentration in either animal industry, animal biology and pre-veterinary medicine, companion and exotic animal biology, or production animal scholars. Students have the opportunity to specialize in horses through course work, directed studies and undergraduate research projects. The draft horse class provides one of these unique opportunities. A semester exchange with the Enniskillen College of Agriculture Horse Program in Northern Ireland provides additional opportunities for those students with an interest in the international horse industry.

    Graduate Studies
    Opportunities exist for graduate education in the area of equine science, though openings are limited. Besides taking graduate level courses, graduate students will conduct their own research and are encouraged to become involved with teaching and extension activities.

    Student Clubs & Teams
    The Horsemen’s Association is the primary undergraduate student organization with a horse emphasis. This organization conducts a number of fund raising activities to help with the support of the Equestrian Teams (Stock Seat & Hunt Seat), the Polo Club, the Dressage Club, and the Judging Team. The Horsemen’s Association also provides a number of activities in association with the horse industry, social activities and annually recognizes exceptional students for their contributions. The MSU Driving Club works with both draft and standard breeds, with a focus on educating individuals on the importance and history of equine driving. The MSU Rodeo Club annually hosts the Spartan Stampede Rodeo and sends a competing rodeo team to NIRA rodeos in the Ozark Region.

    Research

    The primary focus of the horse research program is the growth and development of the equine athlete. The majority of research projects deal with methods to improve longevity and performance of horses through better nutrition, management and training. Particular emphasis is placed on development of the skeletal system.

    Extension & Outreach

    Adult Extension
    The Equine Adult Extension Program provides scientific-based information on production management and health, as well as equine-related legislative issues to the Michigan Horse Industry through county and state-wide programs and publications. Equine Adult Extension Programs are conducted by campus faculty and county staff throughout the state emphasizing sustainable management practices that promotes horse welfare.

    Youth Extension
    The Equine Youth Extension Program coordinates state-level 4-H and youth horse activities. These include the State 4-H Horse Show, State 4-H Horse Jamboree, State 4-H Trail Ride, 4-H Standardbred Project, Teen and Adult 4-H Horse Leader workshops, the Michigan 4-H Horse Judges List, 4-H Horse Benefit clinics and much more! These programs bring potential students to campus and share research-based horse management and youth development principles with tomorrow’s horse industry.

    Equine Facilities

    The MSU Horse Teaching and Research Center maintains a breeding herd of registered Arabian Horses for the teaching, research and outreach functions of the university. All horses are trained, exhibited and prepared for sale by students. Student employees are responsible for the day-to-day care and management of the breeding herd and facility. 

    Fund Raising

    Members of the Michigan horse industry have established the “Friends of the Horse Teaching and Research Center” to provide support for student opportunities relating to horses. Continuing to provide quality hands-on horse activities is made possible through this organization. This is done through annual membership dues as well as horse events that are sponsored by “Friends”. Membership in “Friends” provides a number of unique opportunities for its participants. These include receiving the Friends News Letter, attending The Friends Annual Picnic, becoming a Student Sponsor or part of the Adopt-A-Foal program or all of the above depending on your level of giving.

     

    Dairy Cattle Programs

    Academic Programs

    Below is information about the various programs that are offered.  For a complete description, please review the Undergraduate Student Handbook.

    Dairy Management Agricultural Technology Certificate
    The two-year Dairy Management Agricultural Technology Certificate program is designed to allow women and men the opportunity for specialization in dairy cattle management.

    Bachelors of Science Degree
    Students with a major in Animal Science can select a concentration in either animal industry, animal biology and pre-veterinary medicine, companion and exotic animal biology, or production animal scholars. In addition to course work, students can specialize in dairy through opportunities in the Dairy Associates Program. Scholarship support is provided through the Michigan Dairy Memorial Scholarships.

    Graduate Studies
    Excellent opportunities exist for graduate studies in dairy science here at MSU. Entrance to the program is often limited and very competitive. Students take graduate level courses and conduct research projects that lead to either Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Along with conducting research and taking courses, graduate students are often involved in classroom and laboratory instruction, as well as extension activities such as Michigan 4-H Discovery Day.

    Student Clubs & Teams
    Students interested in Dairy can join the MSU Dairy Club. The purpose of the MSU Dairy Club is to provide students the opportunity develop friendships with other students who are interested in the dairy industry and to increase their contact with the dairy industry in Michigan and nationally. The club meets twice a month during the academic year. Club activities include social activities, club trips to dairy events and farms, an annual cheese sale, an annual calf sale and annual club recognition banquet.

    Students have the opportunity to become members of the MSU Dairy Judging team where they develop their dairy cattle evaluation, reasoning and communication skills. The team competes at a number of intercollegiate judging contests throughout the year. Also, students can participate in the annual North American Intercollegiate Dairy Challenge competition in which they develop their skills in practical dairy management evaluation, team work, data analysis and public speaking.

    Research
    Several faculty members are involved in different areas of research in dairy science.  Currently, areas of focus include reproductive and molecular endocrinology, gamete biology, reproductive management, immunogenetics, molecular virology, stress biology, nutritional physiology, and dairy nutrition.   Research projects are conducted at both molecular and whole animal levels.  Research projects are conducted on the MSU campus.  In addition to on-campus facilities, several research projects are conducted at Kellogg Biological Station and the Upper Peninsula Experiment Station.

    Extension & Outreach

    Adult Extension
    Faculty in the Department of Animal Science partner with campus faculty in other departments and MSUE Dairy Educators located in different regions of the state to form the MSU Dairy Team.  The Team develops and delivers science-based, unbiased, scholarly information related to dairy science, production management, veterinary medicine, engineering, and economics for Sustainable Michigan Dairying.  Many different approaches, options, and technologies are presented for the State’s dairy industry to evaluate for potential implementation into their businesses.  Adult extension education programming is delivered locally, statewide, and regionally as workshops and conferences, newsletters and other printed materials, World Wide Web sites via the Internet, case studies, farm visits, roundtable discussions, and demonstration and applied research projects.

    Youth Extension

    The Dairy Youth Extension Program coordinates state-level 4-H and youth dairy activities. Major activities include the Michigan 4-H Dairy Conference, the MMPA Milk Marketing Tour, and Michigan Dairy Expo and 4-H Dairy Days held each July. The state 4-H and FFA Youth Dairy Judging Contest, Quiz Bowl Contest, and Dairy Management Contest are all part of 4-H Dairy Days. The Michigan 4-H Dairy Judging teams are also part of the program and represent the state of Michigan in 3 national dairy judging contests. Educational workshops are held across the state for youth, parents, and leaders. This program is often the first experience youth and parents students have with Michigan State University and provides a basic foundation of knowledge about the dairy cow and dairy industry.

    Dairy Facilities

    MSU Dairy Cattle Teaching, Research, and Extension programs are conducted at three animal facilities. The primary facility is located on campus in East Lansing, MI with a herd of 140 lactating cows and an equivalent number of calves and heifers. Campus activities are focused on nutrition, reproduction, physiology, disease-related illnesses, and general dairy cow management. Activities range from fundamental to farm-applied studies and student experiences. Another herd of 100 lactating cows (plus heifers and calves) is maintained at the Kellogg Biological Station (Hickory Corners, MI) where the emphasis is on reproduction, physiology, and health research. A third herd of 60 lactating cows, heifers, and calves is located at the Upper Peninsula Experiment Station (Chatham, MI). This herd is used for nutrition and general dairy cattle management research and demonstration projects.

     

    Beef Cattle Programs

    Academic Programs

    Beef Production Agricultural Technology Certificate
    The two-year Beef Production Agricultural Technology Certificate program is designed to allow women and men the opportunity for specialization in beef cattle management. Students in the beef management program have the opportunity to get hands-on training at the nationally known MSU purebred herds. Students also study at the MSU Beef Cattle Teaching & Research Center where new and innovative research and extension programs are conducted.

    Bachelors of Science Degree
    Within the Animal Science major, students can select a concentration in either animal industry, animal biology and pre-veterinary medicine, companion and exotic animal biology, or production animal scholars. Students have the opportunity to specialize in beef through course work, directed studies and undergraduate research projects.  For curriculum information review the undergraduate handbook.

    Graduate Studies

    Opportunities exist for graduate education in the area of beef science, though openings are limited. Besides taking graduate level courses, graduate students conduct their own research and are encouraged to become involved with teaching and extension activities.

    Student Clubs & Teams
    Students pursuing academics in beef production may also be interested in the student clubs and teams available to Animal Science students. Of particular interest to many are the Block & Bridle Club and the MSU Rodeo Club. Block & Bridle provides social activities, as well as coordination of several livestock events throughout the year. The MSU Rodeo Club annually hosts the Spartan Stampede Rodeo and has a competing rodeo team.

    Many students involved in beef production take advantage of the opportunities to become members of the livestock and(or) meats judging teams. Not only do students refine their skills in selection and marketing, they develop communication and reasoning skills that are sought after by employers.

    Research

    The beef research program is focused on three primary areas—ruminant nutrition, beef cattle genetics, and meat science. Research on both applied and basic aspects of beef cattle production is conducted on campus, and at the outlying Lake City Experiment Station and Upper Peninsula Experiment Station.

    Extension & Outreach

    Adult Extension
    The MSU Beef Team provides scientific-based information on production management, health, and beef products to the Michigan beef industry through local, state-wide, and regional programs and publications. Extension programs are conducted by campus faculty and Beef Area of Expertise agents throughout the state.

    Youth Extension
    The youth extension program coordinates state-level 4-H and youth livestock activities. Educational programs and opportunities exist for youth audiences in the areas of management, feeding, breeding, training and marketing of beef, sheep and swine.

    Beef Facilities
    MSU Beef Teaching, Research, and Extension are accomplished using four beef units. On campus, the Purebred Beef Cow/Calf Teaching and Research Center provides students with work experience in breeding, feeding, management and merchandizing of quality beef cattle. Also on campus, the Beef Cattle Teaching and Research Center is utilized in conducting basic and applied beef cattle research as well as providing learning opportunities in feedlot management. The Lake City Experiment Station maintains facilities for beef cow-calf and stocker research and Extension activities, especially as they relate to Michigan forages. The Upper Peninsula Agricultural Experiment Station maintains a commercial beef cow herd used in applied research and Extension programming in Michigan’s unique U.P. environment.

    Fund Raising
    To honor the Animal Science department’s centennial milestone, the Michigan Cattlemen’s Association is establishing an endowed fund to support ongoing excellence within the MSU beef cattle programs. The Beef Cattle Education Endowment Fund will focus on enhancing support for the excellent educational opportunities afforded to students in the MSU beef cattle program, as well as provide a sustained source of funds for MSU’s beef research and teaching facilities, including the Purebred Beef Cow-Calf Teaching and Research Center, and the Beef Cattle Teaching and Research Center.

     

    Weekly Roundup

    The Monday Morning Roundup (name changed to Weekly Roundup in June, 2012) is a weekly newsletter that is distributed to faculty, staff and students.   Please take a moment to check out our Department Newsletter to stay up to date with the happenings here at ANS!

    2013 Weekly Roundup

    2012 Archived Weekly Roundups

    2011 Archived Monday Morning Roundups

     

      Solar Power

      at the Pavilion

      PHOTOVOLTAIS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

      Michigan State University Unveils
      10 Kw Solar PhotoVoltaic System

      “Thanks in large part to a grant from the Energy Office of the state of Michigan’s Department of Consumer and Industry Services, Michigan State University has installed it’s first solar photovoltaic (PV) system at its Pavilion on its East Lansing campus. The system, capable of producing 10kw of electricity will help light the interior of this 171,415 sq ft building that hosts hundreds of events throughout the year.”

      “We are hoping to see how well this system performs in our climate in hopes that we will find other applications for this technology in the years to come,” said Lynda Boomer, university engineer responsible for this project. “Our co-generating Power Plant is being pressed to meet demand created by additional buildings and activities on campus” responded Bob Ellerhorst, director of utilities and waste management for MSU. “Any new sources of electricity will be helpful, especially those that will reduce our consumption of fossil fuels.”

      “The PV system was manufactured by Shell Solar in California. A display in the Pavilion describes the project, demonstrates how the system captures the solar radiation and converts it to electricity. There is also a meter that registers the output of the system at any particular time. Terry Link, director of the of Office of Campus Sustainability, hopes that the project will have multiple benefits. “The many visitors to the Pavilion from around the state will see that solar electricity is possible here in mid Michigan. It will also be a tool from which our students and faculty can study possible applications for other projects using this type of technology. It’s really a teaching-learning tool as much as it is a provider of electricity for our campus,” Link stated. “The university is looking at ways to both conserve energy as well as finding new and more environmentally friendly ways to produce it. This is a terrific opportunity to enhance our knowledge on both the operations and academic side.”

      FACTS IN BRIEF

      10 KW SYSTEM

      SHELL SOLAR MODULES - SP150-PC

      Size 2.5 feet by 5 feet

      72 modules, 900 square foot array

       SUNNY BOY INVERTERS

      MODEL SWR2500U, GRID TIE INVERTER

      Converts the DC output of the modules to AC for grid connection.

      SUNNY BOY CONTROL PLUS

      Monitors the Inverters and provides metering output in kWHRs

       SUPPLIER:

      Sunwize Technologies

      1155 Flatbush Road

      Kingston, NY 12401

      1-845-336-0146

      STATE OF MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER INDUSTRY SERVICES

      http://www.michigan.gov/cis

      ENERGY OFFICE

      Grant $100,000

      Total Project Cost $140,000

      CONTRACTOR:

      Irish Construction - General Contractor

      Superior Electric - Electrical Contractor

      DESIGN:

      Fishbeck, Thompson, Carr & Huber

      Michigan State University

       

       

      Concessions

       

       

      Concessions at the Pavilion are handled through MSU Housing and Food Services Concessions.

      Concessions handles all catering for the MSU Pavilion Events. Events managers may contact the MSU Concessions to discuss meal options. Options include beverage service, breakfast, lunch, dinner, desserts and much more.

      For more information contact:

      MSU Concessions
      Michigan State University
      20 Breslin Center
      East Lansing, Michigan 48824
      Phone 517-353-2005
      Fax 517-353-0606

      MSU Housing and Food Service Concessions Website

       

      Graduate Degree Requirements

      Master’s Degree

      Doctoral Degree

       

      Master’s Degree Candidates- Plan A (with Thesis) and Plan B (No Thesis, but Scholarly Activity)

      Students will have their guidance committee (four members, one of which must be from outside the department) established before the end of the second semester that the student is in graduate school. Students will file before the end of their second semester a Master of Science Degree Proposed Academic Program (Appendix A-2 of the Department of Animal Science Graduate Student Handbook). The minimum credits required for a Master’s degree (Plan A and B) are 30 credits of courses at the 400 level or above (at least 50% must be at the 800 level or higher). A minimum of 6 credits and maximum of 10 credits of thesis research (ANS 899) and maximum of 6 credits of independent study (ANS 890) will be credited in Plan A. No more than 6 credits of Master’s research (ANS 898) and/or advanced independent study (ANS 890) can be credited in Plan B.

      Students must maintain a grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.0 to retain an assistantship and to be retained as a graduate student. Students will be allowed one semester to bring their GPA equal to or greater than 3.0 for retention of the assistantship. Students will be allowed two semesters to bring their GPA equal to or greater than 3.0 for retention as a graduate student.

      The thesis problem (Plan A) or scholarly activity (Plan B) shall be selected by the student in consultation with the major professor and approved by the guidance committee. The thesis (prepared in accordance with the Graduate School Thesis and Dissertation Electronic Submission) must be circulated to members of the guidance committee at least 14 days prior to the Master’s final examination after being judged acceptable by two members of the guidance committee. Every student (Plan A or B) must pass a final oral examination by their guidance committee to complete the requirements for the Master’s degree. All work must be completed within five calendar years from the date of enrollment in the first course included for degree certification.

      Return to top

      Doctoral Degree Candidates

      Students must form a guidance committee (five members, of which one departmental member represents an area of interest other than that of the major professor and one member represents a department other than Animal Science) and file the Report of the Guidance Committee-Doctoral and Other Programs (see Graduate School forms page) before the end of the second semester that a student has begun course work toward the Ph.D. There is no minimum number of course credits required, but students must take at least 24 credits of doctoral dissertation research (ANS 999). Students are limited to a maximum of 8 independent study credits (ANS 890).

      Students must maintain a grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.0 to retain an assistantship and to be retained as a graduate student. Students will be allowed one semester to bring their GPA equal to or greater than 3.0 for retention of the assistantship. Students will be allowed two semesters to bring their GPA equal to or greater than 3.0 for retention as a graduate student.

      Students will be required to write a formal dissertation proposal outlining their proposed doctoral work and to defend the proposal in front of the guidance committee by the end of the fourth semester after initiation of the doctoral program. The student must pass the Ph.D. comprehensive examination no later than the end of seven semesters enrollment in the doctoral program in order to be considered a Ph.D. candidate.

      The dissertation (prepared in accordance with the Graduate School Thesis and Dissertation Electronic Submission) must be circulated to members of the guidance committee at least 14 days prior to the Ph.D. final exam after being judged acceptable by two committee members. Every student must pass a final oral examination by their guidance committee to complete the requirements for the Ph.D. degree. All requirements must be completed within eight calendar years from the date of enrollment in the first course included for degree certification.

      Return to top

      Pavilion Facilities

      Administrative Manager:  Mr. Scott Rancour
      Facility Manager:
      e-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

      Phone: (517) 432-5566       Fax: (517) 353-6624

      ARENA:   

      The pavilion arena seats 2,000 people, and is used to host a variety of both livestock and non-livestock shows

      • Seating for 2,000 People 
      • Over 23,000 Sq. Ft. of floor space with eitehr dirt or solid floor
      • Floor space 114’ x 214’
      • Two large overhead doors leading outside
      • One large overhead door leading directly to Exhibit Area
      • State-of-the art sound system
      • Livestock shows, concert, demonstrations and more

      AUDITORIUM:   

      The auditorium has amphitheater-style seating for 364 people.  It is used for livestock auctions and large meetings.

      • Amphitheater-style seating with side writing arms for 364 eople
      • 8,500 Sq. Ft. textured concrete floor space
      • Large motorized projection screen
      • Direct Access to Exhibit Area
      • Large Overhead doors that lead directly outdoors to paved roads
      • State-of-the art sound system
      • Auctions, clinics, demonstrations, seminars, banquets and more

      EXHIBIT AREA:   

      The exhibit area is over 77,000 sq ft and houses many livestock and commercial shows.

      • Over 77,000 Sq. Ft. textured concrete
      • 368 10’ x 10’ trade show booths or livestock box stalls
      • 920-4 foot livestock tie stalls or 736-5 foot tie stalls
      • 200 small livestock pens
      • Two wash racks
      • Two office with separate phone lines 
      • Fully equipped four-stall milking parlor
      • 1100 Sq. Ft. side room
      • Restrooms equipped with showers
      • Seven large overhead doors leading directly outside for easy load-in and load-out
      • Direct access to Arena and Auditorium
      • State-of-the-art sound system
      • Livestock stalling, trade shows and more

      FACILITY LAYOUT:   

      The MSU Pavilion opened in 1996. 

                      

          Campground Layout                             Facility Layout

      MEETING ROOMS:   

      The pavilion has meeting rooms made to accommodate most group sizes.

      Room A

      670 sq. ft.
      12 tables
      36 chairs
      Maximum capacity 45 people
      $30.00/day

      Room B

      670 sq. ft.
      12 tables
      36 chairs
      Maximum capacity 50 people
      $30.00/day

      Room C/D

      11,500 sq. ft.
      24 tables
      72 chairs
      Maximum capacity 100 people
      $60.00/day

      Auditorium

      8,530 sq. ft.
      364 theatre-style seats with writing arms
      Large motorized projection screen

      Audio/Visual Equipment

      TV/VCR Units (2)—$10.00/day/unit
      Overhead Projectors (2)—$10.00/day/unit
      Slide Projectors (2)—$10.00/day/unit
      LCD Projector (1)—$10.00/day/unit
      Projection Screens (4)
      Standing Podium (1)
      Tabletop Podiums (2)

      If you would like more information regarding our meeting rooms, or would like to make reservations please contact us:

      Administrative Manager:  Mr. Scott Rancour
      Facility Manager:
      e-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
       

       

      Application Process

      Application Process for Domestic & International Students

      1. Submit an online application through the MSU Graduate School and pay the application fee ($50 U.S. dollars). The codes for Animal Science are 0290 for master’s degrees, and 0291 for doctoral degrees. For the Environmental Toxicology PhD degree program, the code is 0472.
      2. Send the following documents to the place indicated (Department address is at end of this page):
        •   Personal/Academic statement (include with the application or send separately to the Department)
        •   Official GRE scores sent from ETS to MSU, code 1465 - (For regular admittance, tests should have been taken within two years of application date and scores must be at or above the   20th percentile in each of the three areas: verbal, quantitative, and analytical writing.) 
        •   Request Official transcripts or academic records be sent directly to the Department from all institutions listed on the application. (A GPA of at least 3.0 for the Bachelor’s Degree is a requirement.)
        •   Arrange for three letters of recommendation be sent to the Department directly from the referees with accompanying MSU Recommendation for Admission cover sheet.  Letters of recommendation can also be uploaded and submitted through the online application system. Once the online application has been submitted, follow the prompts for the submission of recommendation letters.

                     International Students must also have, in addition to the above:

                              English language proficiency scores sent directly to MSU
       
                              Affidavit of Support included with the application or sent to the Department.

      APPLICANTS FROM CHINESE UNIVERSITIES: Please arrange for a verification report of your university transcript or academic records with the China Academic Degree and Graduate Education Development Center (CDGDC). The report must be mailed directly to the MSU Office of Admissions by the CDGDC, rather than by you or any third party.

      China Academic Degree and Graduate Education Development Center

      •       18th Floor, Tongfang Keji Building B
      •       No.1, Wangzhuang Road
      •       Haidian District, Beijing 100083
      •       China
      •       Tel: 86-10-82379480
      •       Fax: 86-10-82379491
      •       Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

            More information regarding the CDGDC is available at this Graduate School website: http://grad.msu.edu/apply/docs/CDGDC.pdf

            Additional Information for International Students

                 ***Please note that the Animal Science Department is encouraging all prospective students to submit as part of their graduate application packet the ETS Personal Potential Index (PPI).MSU Animal Science code is 0105.

           3.   Arrange for all application materials to be received by the deadlines indicated below     

                  Domestic Students -  the complete application packet must be received by the following 
                                                      deadlines:         (dates apply every year)

                     For Fall Semester (semester starts August 16th) - May 16th
                     For Spring Semester (semester starts January 1st) - October 1st  
                     For Summer Semester (semester starts May 16th) - February 16th

                  International Students - the complete application packet must be received by the following 
                                                         deadlines:      (dates apply every year)

                     For Fall Semester (semester starts August 16th) - December 16th (previous year) 
                     For Spring Semester (semester starts January 1st) - March 1st (previous year) 
                     For Summer Semester (semester starts May 16th) - August 16th (previous year)

      ************************************************************************************************************************** 

      Once all documentation has been received, the application materials will be reviewed by the Department Graduate Committee. If the application is accepted by the committee, it will be made available to the faculty for the consideration of anyone in need of a graduate student with applicants’ backgrounds. This process can take up to 6 weeks.

      Faculty can be contacted directly to find out if he/she would be interested in accepting graduate students. Specific areas of research and faculty associated with those areas can be found in the research specialization of our website and in the faculty directory. If direct contact with a faculty member has been made, please indicate that in the personal statement. 

      All documents that are to be sent directly to the Animal Science Department should be sent to:

      Barbara Sweeney
      Michigan State University
      474 S. Shaw Lane, room 1290
      Anthony Hall
      East Lansing, MI 48824

      If you have further questions please contact Barbara Sweeney at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

      Events Calendar

      Administrative Manager:  Mr. Scott Rancour

      Facility Manager:
      e-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

      Phone: (517) 432-5566       Fax: (517) 353-6624

      Pavilion_2015_Calendar.pdf

      Directions

      Directions from points North

      Follow US 27 South to US 127 South. Follow US 127 South to Trowbridge Road (exit 106). Follow Trowbridge Road east to Harrison Road (Trowbridge ends at Harrison). Turn south (right) onto Harrison Road. Follow Harrison Road south approximately 1½ miles to it’s end at Forest Road. Turn east (left) on Forest Road. Follow Forest Road approximately 3/4 mile to the entrance off College Road. Turn left. The Pavilion is on the northeast corner of Forest and College Roads. 

      Directions from Grand Rapids and points West

      Follow I-96 to Business I-496 East (exit 95). Follow I-496 East to Trowbridge Road (exit 106). Follow Trowbridge Road east to Harrison Road (Trowbridge ends at Harrison). Turn south (right) onto Harrison Road. Follow Harrison Road South approximately 1½ miles to it’s end at Forest Road. Turn east (left) on Forest Road. Follow Forest Road approximately 3/4 mile to the entrance off College Road. Turn left. The Pavilion is on the northeast corner of Forest and College Roads.

       

      Directions from Detroit and points Southeast

      Follow I-96 to the Okemos Road (exit 110). Go north on Okemos road approximately 1/2 mile to Jolly Road. Turn west (left) on Jolly Road. Follow Jolly Road west to College Road. Turn north (right) on College Road. Follow College Road north to Forest Road. Proceed north across Forest Road into the entrance off College Road. The Pavilion is on the northeast corner of Forest and College Roads.

       

      Directions from Flint and points Northeast

      Follow I-69 to the Business I-69/ East Lansing exit. Follow Business I-69 (also called Saginaw and Old M-78) west to Hagadorn Road. Turn south (left) on Hagadorn Road. Follow Hagadorn south to Bennett Road. Turn west (right) on Bennett Road. Follow Bennett west to College Road. Turn north (right) on College Road. Follow College north to Forest Road. Proceed North across Forest Road into the entrance off College Road. The Pavilion is on the northeast corner of Forest and College Roads.

      Directions from Jackson and points South

      Follow US 127 North to Trowbridge Road (exit 106). Follow Trowbridge Road east to Harrison Road (Trowbridge ends at Harrison). Turn south (right) onto Harrison Road. Follow Harrison Road south approximately 1½ miles to it’s end at Forest Road. Turn east (left) on Forest Road. Follow Forest Road approximately 3/4 mile to the entrance off College Road. Turn left. The Pavilion is on the northeast corner of Forest and College Roads.

      Maps & Alerts

          Mapquest Driving Directions

          MSU Interactive Maps

          MSU Construction Alerts

      About Us

      MSU Pavilion

      • Opened in December of 1996
      • Handicap accessible
      • State of the art sound system
      • Easy access on-site lighted parking for over 1,500 vehicles
      • Full concessions
      • On-site licensed campground with over 96 campsites equipped with electrical hook-up, dump station, shower facilities and two locations to fill water tanks
      • Easy access to interstate
      • South Barn:  140 10x10 box stalls, 1/2 all dirt & 1/2 with concrete walk ways, dirt has been used as riding/show arena for small events. Great for livestock sales!

       

      Pavilion

      For Agriculture and Livestock Education

      Contact Information

      Administrative Manager:  Mr. Scott Rancour
      Facility Manager:
      e-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

      Phone: (517) 432-5566       Fax: (517) 353-6624

      Location:

      Located on the corner of Farm Lane and Mt. Hope on the Campus of Michigan State University

      Mailing Address:

      Pavilion
      Animal Science Department
      1290 Anthony Hall
      East Lansing, MI 48824
      Phone:  517 432-5566
      Fax:  517 353-6624

      Street Address:

      4301 Farm Lane
      Lansing, MI 48910


      MSU Policy for Livestock Events

      Hotels & Campgrounds

      “If you would like to view the Pavilion videos, visit http://www.youtube.com/msuanrvideo16.”

      Events

      Laboratories

      Animal Behavior & Welfare:
      3286 Anthony, 432-7494, Dr. Siegford

      Cellular Reprogramming:
      B270, B275, B280, B285 Anthony, 432-7065, Dr. Cibelli

      Developmental Epigenetics:
      B233 Anthony, 432-7498, Dr. Knott

      Equine Research:
      2235 Anthony, 353-4866, Dr. Nielsen

      Forage Nutrition:
      2245 Anthony, 432-1457, Dr. Allen

      Immunogenetics:
      B212 Anthony, 353-9815, Dr. Coussens

      Lipid Research
      2270 Anthony, 353-9729, Dr. Lock

      Meadows Dairy Research:
      2235 Anthony, 432-7065, Dr. Beede

      Meat Science:
      3300 Anthony, 355-8452 ext. 206
      3315 Anthony, 355-8452 ext. 207
      3320 Anthony, 355-8452 ext. 208
      3325 Anthony, 355-8452 ext. 209
      3330 Anthony, 355-8452 ext. 210

      Microbiology:
      2220 Anthony, 353-4867, Drs. Yokoyama and Trottier

      Molecular Genetics:
      3330 Anthony, 355-8452 ext. 210, Dr. Ernst

      Molecular Reproductive Endocrinology:
      B228 Anthony, 355-8392, Dr. Ireland

      Molecular Virology:
      B215 Anthony, 353-7291, Dr. Coussens

      Non-ruminant Nutrition:
      2215 Anthony, 432-1448, Drs. Hill and Rozeboom
      2220 Anthony, 354-4867, Dr. Trottier

      Physiology:
      B255 Anthony, 432-1456, Drs. Smith and Fogwell

      Ruminant Metabolism:
      2270 Anthony, 432-1454, Drs. VandeHaar and Weber Nielsen

      Ruminant Nutrition:
      2250 Anthony, 355-3802, Dr. Rust

      Toxicology:
      2215 Anthony, 432-1382, Dr. Bursian
      3223 Anthony, 355-8425, Drs. Chou and Zwiernik

      Turkey Nutrition & Metabolism:
      2223 Anthony, 353-9826, Drs. Orth

      Wildlife Toxicology
      3223 Anthony, 432-1382, Dr. Zwiernik

       

      Department Chair Bulletins

      Thank you so much for your support of the Department of Animal Science. With your help we are able to engage in many different activities in teaching, research and extension. We have developed this short newsletter so we can share our pride in some of the accomplishments achieved by our faculty, staff and students. Each issue spotlights a different aspect of our Department.

       

      Toxicology

      Steven J. Bursian, Professor
      Principle Investigator, Animal Toxicology Laboratory
      Katrina L. Shields, Research Assistant/Laboratory Coordinator

      Our laboratory studies the effects of natural toxins such as mycotoxins and environmental contaminants such as PCBs and dioxins on animals. For the past 40 years, past and present members of our group have worked with mink and have contributed significantly to the extensive database regarding not only the biology of this species, but also the unique sensitivity of the mink to persistent environmental contaminants. Most recently, we have conducted a number of feeding trials with mink that assessed the reproductive and health effects of environmentally derived chemical contaminants from specific areas of concern such as the Saginaw River in Michigan and the Housatonic River in Massachusetts. We are also studying a unique lesion of the jaw that occurs in mink exposed to specific chlorinated contaminants that are common in the environment. Additionally, we have conducted a number of studies that have examined the effects of common environmental contaminants as well as emerging contaminants on avian embryo development. We are fortunate to have a number of fellow scientists not only at MSU but at other research facilities throughout the word, that collaborate with us on our studies. The data that this laboratory has generated over the years have been and will continue to be important information incorporated into ecological risk assessments.

      Karen Chou, Associate Professor
      Toxicology Group

      My laboratory studies the exposure and health effects of environmental chemicals in mammalian species, with a focus on developmental and reproductive toxicity. The laboratory examines the mechanism of toxicity of pesticides and endocrine disruptors on testicular function, sperm and egg production, and fertility. The target mechanisms include the functions of endocrine systems, production of reactive oxygen species, and the relationship between clusters of alternations in gene expression and long-term reproductive performance. A second major focus of my laboratory is the development of improved semen preservation methods for livestock. The study models include laboratory animals, livestock, and cultured gametes.

      Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

      • Cibelli, Jose (cellular reprogramming, nuclear transfer, embryonic stem cells)
      • Smith, George (reproduction, ovarian function, stress physiology, functional genomics)

      Jose B. Cibelli, Professor
      Endowed Chair for Large Animal Biotechnology
      Depts. of Animal Science, Physiology, and the College of Veterinary Medicine

      Our Cellular Reprogramming Laboratory focuses in two aspects of developmental biology. (1) Nuclear Transfer—Cloning: A number of different laboratories, including our own, have demonstrated that a somatic (body) cell, once fused with an egg, is capable of generating not only stem cells (ref 1) but a whole new organism as well (refs 2-4). Interestingly, we still do not comprehend how this is possible. Our laboratory focuses on understanding the molecular events that lead to the transformation of a somatic nucleus into an embryonic-pluripotent one. Insights into the mechanism of de-differentiation will help us generate cloned animals at optimal efficiency for their use in agriculture and medicine (ref 5). (2) Primate Embryonic Stem Cells: Embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of maintaining an undifferentiated or ‘pluripotent’ state in vitro. At the same time, by modifying the culture conditions, they can generate daughter cells capable of forming all the tissues in the body. We have demonstrated that somatic cells can be turned into ES cells either by nuclear transfer (cloning; ref 1) or by parthenogenesis (ref 6), and that these cells can later be induced to differentiate into multiple complex tissues (ref 6). In order for us to understand how the state of pluripotency is reached and maintained, ES cells are carefully analyzed at the molecular level. Our challenge is now to learn how to produce these cells without having to relay on eggs (ref 7).

      REFERENCES CITED
      Cibelli JB, Stice SL, Golueke PJ, et al. (1998) Transgenic bovine chimeric offspring produced from somatic cell-derived stem-like cells. Nat Biotechnol 16: 642-646.

      Cibelli JB, Stice SL, Golueke PJ, et al. (1998) Cloned transgenic calves produced from nonquiescent fetal fibroblasts. Science 280: 1256-1258.

      Lanza RP, Cibelli JB, Blackwell C, et al. (2000) Extension of cell life-span and telomere length in animals cloned from senescent somatic cells [see comments]. Science 288: 665-669.

      Lanza RP, Cibelli JB, Faber D, et al. (2001) Cloned cattle can be healthy and normal. Science 294: 1893-1894.

      Cibelli JB, Campbell KH, Seidel GE, West MD, Lanza RP. (2002) The health profile of cloned animals. Nat Biotechnol 20: 13-14.

      Cibelli JB, Grant KA, Chapman KB, et al. (2002) Parthenogenetic stem cells in nonhuman primates. Science 295: 819.

      Cibelli J, Kiessling A, Cunniff K, Richards C, Lanza R, West M. (2001) Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer in Humans: Pronuclear and Early Embryonic Development. e-biomed: The Journal of Regenerative Medicine Volume 2.

      George W. Smith, Professor
      Principal Investigator, Molecular Animal Reproduction and Neuroendocrinology Laboratory
      Depts. of Animal Science and Physiology

      Research efforts in the Molecular Animal Reproduction and Neuroendocrinology Laboratory have focused on investigation of fundamental mechanisms that regulate ovarian function in farm animals and the physiological and neuroendocrine mechanisms involved in regulation of the stress response. We have obtained new insight into the hormonal regulation and regulatory role of members of the matrix metalloproteinase gene family in control of follicle rupture and the hormonal regulation and physiological role of various components of the corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) system in promoting the stress response. Recent research efforts also utilize functional genomics approaches to identify specific components of the oocyte transcriptome [catalog of genes expressed in the female germ cell] that play a key role in regulation of folliculogenesis, oocyte function and early embryonic development, and to identify objective molecular markers that are predictive of oocyte competence and subsequent potential reproductive success post-fertilization.

      Skeletal Physiology

      • Nielsen, Brian (equine exercise physiology, nutrition, athletic performance)
      • Orth, Michael (joint and skeletal health, nutrition, diagnostics)

      Brian D. Nielsen, Professor
      Principal Investigator, Equine Exercise Physiology Laboratory
      Cara O’Connor, Research Assistant

      Dr. Nielsen heads the equine research program in the Department of Animal Science. Cara O’Connor, his research assistant, coordinates and manages the research laboratory and oversees many of the research projects. The primary focus of their research, conducted with graduate and undergraduate students, is aimed at improving the growth and development of the equine athlete, with special attention given to the prevention of musculoskeletal injuries. Much of their research examines the response of bone to mechanical loading and the lack thereof, and has been done not only with horses, but also with cattle and dogs. Furthermore, research on the effect of housing management on bone development in young horses has led to collaborative work in horse behavior and welfare. Many nutritional studies are conducted, particularly in the area of mineral nutrition, with special emphasis on bio-available silicon supplementation and its influence on animal health. The team has also put significant research efforts into the exploration of the special dietary needs of weanling and yearling horses in order to improve growth and prevent developmental orthopedic disorders. In addition to these primary areas, special projects explore the use of various ergogenic agents on performance enhancement in equine athletes.

      Michael Orth, Professor
      Growth and Musculoskeletal Biology Laboratory

      My research interests focus on improving joint and skeletal health in livestock species and companion animals. We have three primary interests at the present time. First, glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate are two nutraceutical products that have been reported to improve joint health in both animals and humans. Our objective is to elucidate the mechanisms of action of those compounds since how they work in vivo is not well understood. We also investigate other molecules as well that might promote joint health. Second, in conjunction with colleagues in Engineering, Osteopathic Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, we are continually striving to improve in vitro models for the study of cartilage degeneration. Third, we are interested in using biological fluid markers to monitor bone health in livestock species. We have conducted collaborative research projects in several livestock species. Many diagnostic tools developed for humans have tremendous potential in the livestock industry for evaluating strategies designed to improve bone health.

      Ruminant Nutrition

      Michael S. Allen, Professor
      Principal Investigator, Digestive Physiology Laboratory
      David G. Main, Laboratory Coordinator

      Our research team studies the relationship between digestion characteristics of feeds and energy intake, efficiency of microbial protein production in the rumen, partitioning of metabolic fuels and milk production. Digestion characteristics of feeds affect the amount, type and temporal variation of metabolic fuels absorbed, and nitrogen utilization by ruminal microbes and the animal. Temporal variation in absorbed metabolic fuels affects meal size (determined by satiety) and intermeal interval (determined by hunger), which together determine feed intake as well as partitioning of energy to adipose tissue and the mammary gland. Our overall goal is to maximize efficiency of nutrient utilization by ruminant animals with emphasis on nitrogen while formulating diets to maintain animal health.

      David K. Beede, Professor and C. E. Meadows Endowed Chair
      Principal Investigator, Meadows Laboratory

      The C. E. Meadows Chair promotes scholarly research, extension and teaching in response to the needs of the Michigan dairy industry. Activities embrace and support the Land Grant mission of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and MSU. The Chair provides intellectual leadership to the MSU faculty as well as the dairy industry of the state in a broad area encompassed under dairy management. The Chair supports and integrates contributions of both the biological and economic disciplines for efficient and environmentally sustainable dairy production. Current research objectives are:

      1. to determine biological strategies and whole-farm systems approaches to increase the efficiency of utilization and reduce excretion of phosphorus (P) by dairy cattle;
      2. to determine if varying dietary P concentrations in prepartum diets affects peripartum health and productive performance, and P excretion by dairy cattle;
      3. to develop and test management and nutritional strategies for pregnant dairy cows to improve transition performance;
      4. to test the validity of the approach to establish the maintenance requirement for absorbed P for ruminating dairy animals (NRC, 2001);
      5. to determine if prepartum exercise of dry pregnant cows is efficacious to improve postpartum performance as indicated by metabolic adaptations, bone metabolism, periparturient health, and lactation and reproductive performance; and
      6. to develop and integrate whole-farm systems models to optimize productive, environmental and economic management of dairy businesses.

      Daniel Buskirk, Associate Professor

      Our research focuses on nutritional management of beef systems. Current research includes manipulating carcass traits by feeding regimen, and identifying factors affecting proliferation and differentiation of bovine preadipocytes. This will provide insight necessary to exploit developmental differences in adipose tissue depots through nutrition and management. The ultimate goal is to enhance the quality of consumer-driven beef products. Additional areas of research include calf weaning systems that reduce stress and improve gain, stocker cattle management strategies that optimize feed use, and cow feeding systems that improve forage utilization.

      Adam Lock, Assistant Professor
      Ruminant Nutrition, Nutritional & Digestive Physiology, Lactation Biology) Courtney Preseault, Laboratory Manager & Research Technician

      Research in the Lock lab focuses on the regulation and manipulation of ruminant lipid metabolism, allowing improvements in the efficiency of animal production and providing opportunities to design foods that are consistent with consumer perceptions and dietary recommendations. Of particular interest is the effect of diet on the production of bioactive fatty acids in the rumen, their subsequent impact on metabolism and milk fat synthesis in the mammary gland and applying this knowledge to improve our ability to troubleshoot on farm issues related to milk fat depression. The impact of milk on human health, in particular the role of milk fat, is also of special interest.

      Wendy Powers, Professor, Director of Environmental Stewardship for Animal Agriculture

      Steven Rust, Professor
      Ruminant Nutrition Laboratory

      Our research activities have been focused on feeding and management strategies to improve growth, efficiency and carcass quality of feedlot cattle. We have conducted several studies on the use of Propionibacterium as a starter culture for ensiling high-moisture corn and its use as a direct-fed additive to feedlot diets. Dr. rust is a co-author for two patents on this technology. Another area of current research includes feeding and management strategies to lessen the occurrence and severity of acidosis in cattle fed high concentrate diets. Probiotics or direct-fed microbials may provide some assistance in managing subacute acidosis. Studies are currently being conducted to develop strategies to minimize methane production in cattle. Various inhibitor type compounds have been investigated. The impact of implants, age and cattle type on profitability, tenderness and palatability is also a current research activity. Evaluation of corn hybrids and endosperm types in relation to protein supplementation strategies is currently under investigation. Other research topics include: receiving programs for newly received cattle, use of byproduct feed in high concentrate diets, use of repartitioning agents and growth-promoting implants on carcass quality, and protein nutrition. Many of the research projects utilize live animals in growth or metabolism studies.

      Michael J. VandeHaar, Professor
      Ruminant Metabolism Laboratory
      Jim Liesman, Research Associate

      My research program includes dairy nutrition and mammary physiology, replacement heifer nutrition and management and nutrition modeling. The major research focus is to identify mechanisms by which nutrition alters mammary development of dairy heifers with emphasis on leptin and the insulin-like growth factor system.

      Miriam S. Weber Nielsen, Assistant Professor
      Ruminant Metabolism Laboratory
      Larry Chapin, Research Technician

      Our research program focuses on identifying hormonal and nutritional factors that regulate growth and development of the bovine mammary gland. The emphasis of our current work is on evaluating development of the mammary gland in growing heifers and in response to changes in nutritional management. The laboratory also conducts work to identify factors that regulate proliferation of mammary epithelial cells in vitro. Research involves a variety of techniques including cell culture, immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, cDNA microarrays, Northern blotting, Western blotting, ELISA, radioimmunoassay and others. The overall goal of our research is to identify strategies to more efficiently raise and manage dairy heifers to be productive lactating cows.

      Reproduction and Endocrinology

      Steven J. Bursian, Professor
      Principle Investigator, Animal Toxicology Laboratory
      Katrina L. Shields, Research Assistant/Laboratory Coordinator

      Our laboratory studies the effects of natural toxins such as mycotoxins and environmental contaminants such as PCBs and dioxins on animals. For the past 40 years, past and present members of our group have worked with mink and have contributed significantly to the extensive database regarding not only the biology of this species, but also the unique sensitivity of the mink to persistent environmental contaminants. Most recently, we have conducted a number of feeding trials with mink that assessed the reproductive and health effects of environmentally derived chemical contaminants from specific areas of concern such as the Saginaw River in Michigan and the Housatonic River in Massachusetts. We are also studying a unique lesion of the jaw that occurs in mink exposed to specific chlorinated contaminants that are common in the environment. Additionally, we have conducted a number of studies that have examined the effects of common environmental contaminants as well as emerging contaminants on avian embryo development. We are fortunate to have a number of fellow scientists not only at MSU but at other research facilities throughout the word, that collaborate with us on our studies. The data that this laboratory has generated over the years have been and will continue to be important information incorporated into ecological risk assessments.

      Karen Chou, Associate Professor
      Toxicology Group

      My laboratory studies the exposure and health effects of environmental chemicals in mammalian species, with a focus on developmental and reproductive toxicity. The laboratory examines the mechanism of toxicity of pesticides and endocrine disruptors on testicular function, sperm and egg production, and fertility. The target mechanisms include the functions of endocrine systems, production of reactive oxygen species, and the relationship between clusters of alternations in gene expression and long-term reproductive performance. A second major focus of my laboratory is the development of improved semen preservation methods for livestock. The study models include laboratory animals, livestock, and cultured gametes.

      Jose B. Cibelli, Professor
      Endowed Chair for Large Animal Biotechnology
      Depts. of Animal Science, Physiology, and the College of Veterinary Medicine

      Our Cellular Reprogramming Laboratory focuses in two aspects of developmental biology. (1) Nuclear Transfer—Cloning: A number of different laboratories, including our own, have demonstrated that a somatic (body) cell, once fused with an egg, is capable of generating not only stem cells (ref 1) but a whole new organism as well (refs 2-4). Interestingly, we still do not comprehend how this is possible. Our laboratory focuses on understanding the molecular events that lead to the transformation of a somatic nucleus into an embryonic-pluripotent one. Insights into the mechanism of de-differentiation will help us generate cloned animals at optimal efficiency for their use in agriculture and medicine (ref 5). (2) Primate Embryonic Stem Cells: Embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of maintaining an undifferentiated or ‘pluripotent’ state in vitro. At the same time, by modifying the culture conditions, they can generate daughter cells capable of forming all the tissues in the body. We have demonstrated that somatic cells can be turned into ES cells either by nuclear transfer (cloning; ref 1) or by parthenogenesis (ref 6), and that these cells can later be induced to differentiate into multiple complex tissues (ref 6). In order for us to understand how the state of pluripotency is reached and maintained, ES cells are carefully analyzed at the molecular level. Our challenge is now to learn how to produce these cells without having to relay on eggs (ref 7).

      REFERENCES CITED
      Cibelli JB, Stice SL, Golueke PJ, et al. (1998) Transgenic bovine chimeric offspring produced from somatic cell-derived stem-like cells. Nat Biotechnol 16: 642-646.

      Cibelli JB, Stice SL, Golueke PJ, et al. (1998) Cloned transgenic calves produced from nonquiescent fetal fibroblasts. Science 280: 1256-1258.

      Lanza RP, Cibelli JB, Blackwell C, et al. (2000) Extension of cell life-span and telomere length in animals cloned from senescent somatic cells [see comments]. Science 288: 665-669.

      Lanza RP, Cibelli JB, Faber D, et al. (2001) Cloned cattle can be healthy and normal. Science 294: 1893-1894.

      Cibelli JB, Campbell KH, Seidel GE, West MD, Lanza RP. (2002) The health profile of cloned animals. Nat Biotechnol 20: 13-14.

      Cibelli JB, Grant KA, Chapman KB, et al. (2002) Parthenogenetic stem cells in nonhuman primates. Science 295: 819.

      Cibelli J, Kiessling A, Cunniff K, Richards C, Lanza R, West M. (2001) Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer in Humans: Pronuclear and Early Embryonic Development. e-biomed: The Journal of Regenerative Medicine Volume 2.

      James J. Ireland. Professor
      Director, Molecular Reproductive Endocrinology Laboratory
      Depts. Animal Science and Physiology
      Janet L.H. Ireland, Laboratory Coordinator
      Fermin Jimenez-Krassel, Chief Research Associate

      Our laboratory focuses on elucidation of the physiological role hormones, growth factors and cytokines have in regulation of selection, growth, and function of dominant follicles in cattle; and on use of molecular technology (DNA array, real-time PCR) to identify new genes potentially involved in aging-induced alterations in selection, growth, differentiation and function of dominant follicles. We are keenly interested in identification of the intrafollicular factors that regulate aromatase activity in granulosa cells of dominant follicles because of the pivotal physiological role estradiol has in reproduction and other non-reproductive processes. From a practical standpoint, we are interested in development of new diagnostic methods to identify cattle with superior fertility. Our laboratory has considerable expertise in large animal surgery (including utero-ovarian vein cannulations for blood sampling and ovariectomy), ultrasound analysis of follicular development, ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of ovarian follicles, ultrasound-guided intrafollicular injection of drugs, ELISA, RIA, Northern and immunoblot analysis, DNA array, PCR, protein purification, antibody development, and cell culture.

      Richard Pursley, Professor

      Our group does research and subsequent extension of reproductive management strategies to enhance profitability of dairy production. In particular we study ovarian physiology in cattle with primary emphasis on follicular development. We are also studying hormonal control of follicular growth to synchronize ovulation and to increase embryo production in superstimulated cows.

      George W. Smith, Professor
      Principal Investigator, Molecular Animal Reproduction and Neuroendocrinology Laboratory
      Depts. of Animal Science and Physiology

      Research efforts in the Molecular Animal Reproduction and Neuroendocrinology Laboratory have focused on investigation of fundamental mechanisms that regulate ovarian function in farm animals and the physiological and neuroendocrine mechanisms involved in regulation of the stress response. We have obtained new insight into the hormonal regulation and regulatory role of members of the matrix metalloproteinase gene family in control of follicle rupture and the hormonal regulation and physiological role of various components of the corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) system in promoting the stress response. Recent research efforts also utilize functional genomics approaches to identify specific components of the oocyte transcriptome [catalog of genes expressed in the female germ cell] that play a key role in regulation of folliculogenesis, oocyte function and early embryonic development, and to identify objective molecular markers that are predictive of oocyte competence and subsequent potential reproductive success post-fertilization.

      Michael J. VandeHaar, Professor
      Ruminant Metabolism Laboratory
      Jim Liesman, Research Associate

      My research program includes dairy nutrition and mammary physiology, replacement heifer nutrition and management and nutrition modeling. The major research focus is to identify mechanisms by which nutrition alters mammary development of dairy heifers with emphasis on leptin and the insulin-like growth factor system.

      Nutritional and Digestive Physiology

      Michael S. Allen, Professor
      Principal Investigator, Digestive Physiology Laboratory
      David G. Main, Laboratory Coordinator

      Our research team studies the relationship between digestion characteristics of feeds and energy intake, efficiency of microbial protein production in the rumen, partitioning of metabolic fuels and milk production. Digestion characteristics of feeds affect the amount, type and temporal variation of metabolic fuels absorbed, and nitrogen utilization by ruminal microbes and the animal. Temporal variation in absorbed metabolic fuels affects meal size (determined by satiety) and intermeal interval (determined by hunger), which together determine feed intake as well as partitioning of energy to adipose tissue and the mammary gland. Our overall goal is to maximize efficiency of nutrient utilization by ruminant animals with emphasis on nitrogen while formulating diets to maintain animal health.

      Adam Lock, Assistant Professor
      Ruminant Nutrition, Nutritional & Digestive Physiology, Lactation Biology) Courtney Preseault, Laboratory Manager & Research Technician

      Research in the Lock lab focuses on the regulation and manipulation of ruminant lipid metabolism, allowing improvements in the efficiency of animal production and providing opportunities to design foods that are consistent with consumer perceptions and dietary recommendations. Of particular interest is the effect of diet on the production of bioactive fatty acids in the rumen, their subsequent impact on metabolism and milk fat synthesis in the mammary gland and applying this knowledge to improve our ability to troubleshoot on farm issues related to milk fat depression. The impact of milk on human health, in particular the role of milk fat, is also of special interest.

      Nathalie L. Trottier, Associate Professor
      Non-ruminant Nutrition Laboratory

      The overall objective of my research program is to study factors affecting and regulating amino acid utilization in animals. To accomplish this objective, we have focused on three major areas. The first area is the estimation of amino acid requirements of non-ruminants species at different stages of production. In this area, my primary focus is lactation both in the pig and the horse. Our approach to determine amino acid requirements during lactation uses a combination of the traditional milk amino acid profile as well as mammary amino acid uptake profile. More recently, in collaboration with Drs. Brian Nielsen, John Shelle and Christine Skelly, I have begun testing various approaches to estimate protein requirements of the exercising horse. My second area of research involves the study of factors controlling the availability of amino acids for milk production. In this area we have examined aspects such as dietary protein intake, blood flow, and more recently, in collaboration with Dr. Jeanne Burton, whether amino acid transport processes pose a limitation on milk protein synthesis. To accomplish the later, we are using a combination of kinetic and molecular approaches to identify and characterize amino acid transport systems and proteins. We hope that the information generated will provide major advances in our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms for milk protein synthesis and the efficiency of amino acid utilization by the mammary gland. My third area of research focuses on the optimization of dietary amino acid utilization to lessen environmental nitrogen losses. Because nitrogen (N) and ammonium (NH4+) are major components of agricultural waste contributing to environmental pollution, the optimization of dietary amino acid utilization during growth or other productive functions has become one of my research priorities. There is discrepancy between studies on growth performance, body composition, and nitrogen status in animals fed reduced crude protein diets to limit nitrogen losses. We are currently focusing on identifying the factors that pose a limitation on dietary crude protein reduction. Better understanding of the dietary manipulations that can reduce nitrogen losses and maintain production efficiencies is needed to assist in designing nutrient management plans.

      Michael J. VandeHaar, Professor
      Ruminant Metabolism Laboratory
      Jim Liesman, Research Associate

      My research program includes dairy nutrition and mammary physiology, replacement heifer nutrition and management and nutrition modeling. The major research focus is to identify mechanisms by which nutrition alters mammary development of dairy heifers with emphasis on leptin and the insulin-like growth factor system.

      Microbiology

      • Coussens, Paul (molecular pathogenesis, immunobiology, functional genomics)
      • Rust, Steven (beef nutrition and feedlot management, carcass quality)
      • Yokoyama, Melvin (rumen and gastrointestinal microbiology, manure management)

      Paul M. Coussens, Professor
      Principal Investigator, Molecular Pathogenesis Laboratory
      Depts. Animal Science and Microbiology and Molecular Genetics
      Chris Colvin, Research Technician and Laboratory Coordinator

      The Molecular Pathogenesis Laboratory (MPL) focuses on the nature, cause, and host response to infectious diseases in livestock species. As many of the pathogens of importance to livestock species are zoonotics, our work often has biomedical implications, as well as relevance to animal health. Pathogens currently under study with a network of national and international collaborators include Mycobacterium paratuberculosis (Johne’s disease), M. bovis (bovine tuberculosis), bovine viral diarrhea virus, Brucella abortus, and several parasitic diseases in cattle. Work within the MPL is aided by an outstanding base of state-of-the-art equipment and tools for functional genomics. Although highly molecular in our approach to studying pathogenesis, all students in the MPL work with the appropriate host species, gaining experience in sampling and recognizing the effects of infectious disease. Students within the MPL also have ample opportunities for travel to multiple international laboratories of our collaborators during their course of study.

      Steven Rust, Professor
      Ruminant Nutrition Laboratory

      Our research activities have been focused on feeding and management strategies to improve growth, efficiency and carcass quality of feedlot cattle. We have conducted several studies on the use of Propionibacterium as a starter culture for ensiling high-moisture corn and its use as a direct-fed additive to feedlot diets. Dr. rust is a co-author for two patents on this technology. Another area of current research includes feeding and management strategies to lessen the occurrence and severity of acidosis in cattle fed high concentrate diets. Probiotics or direct-fed microbials may provide some assistance in managing subacute acidosis. Studies are currently being conducted to develop strategies to minimize methane production in cattle. Various inhibitor type compounds have been investigated. The impact of implants, age and cattle type on profitability, tenderness and palatability is also a current research activity. Evaluation of corn hybrids and endosperm types in relation to protein supplementation strategies is currently under investigation. Other research topics include: receiving programs for newly received cattle, use of byproduct feed in high concentrate diets, use of repartitioning agents and growth-promoting implants on carcass quality, and protein nutrition. Many of the research projects utilize live animals in growth or metabolism studies.

      Melvin T. Yokoyama, Professor
      Principal Investigator, Rumen and Gastrointestinal Microbiology Laboratory
      Susan M. Hengemuehle, Laboratory Coordinator

      Microorganisms play a key role in the health, well being and productivity of livestock. Most microbes are beneficial to livestock, with only a few involved in diseases and other deleterious effects. The goal of our research program is to better understand the role of microorganisms in complex ecosystems of importance to livestock, including the rumen and gastrointestinal tract, in ensiled feeds, in livestock manure management, and other related microbial environments. Recent research has involved:

      1. characterizing the microbial population in swine manure slurry for odor producing and degrading bacterial species,
      2. probiotics and antagonistic bacterial species for controlling food borne pathogens,
      3. inhibition of ruminal methanogenesis and
      4. enumerating and characterizing cellulolytic bacteria in the cecum of equine.

      Non-Ruminant Nutrition

      Gretchen Hill, Professor

      Understanding the role of trace element nutrition in livestock from the basic nutrient utilization and conservation to the molecular basis is the encompassing goal of our laboratory. Our current research objectives are to:

      • Determine the molecular role of pharmacological zinc in enhancing growth of the nursery pig
      • Investigate cellular iron homeostasis in swine by determining the role of iron regulatory proteins
      • Reduce the amount of trace elements excreted by livestock while maintaining efficient production
      • Provide new insights on selenium needs of cows and their calves relative to thermo energy regulation and ultimately health
      • Understand trace element interactions and their affect on health
      • Determine status indicators and parameters that influence the trace element requirements of reproducing females in livestock herds

      Brian D. Nielsen, Professor
      Principal Investigator, Equine Exercise Physiology Laboratory
      Cara O’Connor, Research Assistant

      Dr. Nielsen heads the equine research program in the Department of Animal Science. Cara O’Connor, his research assistant, coordinates and manages the research laboratory and oversees many of the research projects. The primary focus of their research, conducted with graduate and undergraduate students, is aimed at improving the growth and development of the equine athlete, with special attention given to the prevention of musculoskeletal injuries. Much of their research examines the response of bone to mechanical loading and the lack thereof, and has been done not only with horses, but also with cattle and dogs. Furthermore, research on the effect of housing management on bone development in young horses has led to collaborative work in horse behavior and welfare. Many nutritional studies are conducted, particularly in the area of mineral nutrition, with special emphasis on bio-available silicon supplementation and its influence on animal health. The team has also put significant research efforts into the exploration of the special dietary needs of weanling and yearling horses in order to improve growth and prevent developmental orthopedic disorders. In addition to these primary areas, special projects explore the use of various ergogenic agents on performance enhancement in equine athletes.

      Michael Orth, Associate Professor
      Growth and Musculoskeletal Biology Laboratory

      My research interests focus on improving joint and skeletal health in livestock species and companion animals. We have three primary interests at the present time. First, glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate are two nutraceutical products that have been reported to improve joint health in both animals and humans. Our objective is to elucidate the mechanisms of action of those compounds since how they work in vivo is not well understood. We also investigate other molecules as well that might promote joint health. Second, in conjunction with colleagues in Engineering, Osteopathic Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, we are continually striving to improve in vitro models for the study of cartilage degeneration. Third, we are interested in using biological fluid markers to monitor bone health in livestock species. We have conducted collaborative research projects in several livestock species. Many diagnostic tools developed for humans have tremendous potential in the livestock industry for evaluating strategies designed to improve bone health.

      Wendy Powers, Professor, Director of Environmental Stewardship for Animal Agriculture

      Dale W. Rozeboom, Professor

      Our research activities are focused on generating information needed by swine producers in order to enhance their economic opportunities and in dealing with the increasing social and environmental pressures being placed on their businesses. Thus, our work is in the areas of nutrition, reproduction, behavior and the management of production systems. We are currently studying the environmental and biosecurity risks of animal tissue recycling using composting, the effect of pre-farrow feed intake on sow reproduction, sow response to varied feeder design in lactation and the use of dietary fiber to modify the growth pattern of pre-pubertal gilts.

      Nathalie L. Trottier, Associate Professor
      Non-ruminant Nutrition Laboratory

      The overall objective of my research program is to study factors affecting and regulating amino acid utilization in animals. To accomplish this objective, we have focused on three major areas. The first area is the estimation of amino acid requirements of non-ruminants species at different stages of production. In this area, my primary focus is lactation both in the pig and the horse. Our approach to determine amino acid requirements during lactation uses a combination of the traditional milk amino acid profile as well as mammary amino acid uptake profile. More recently, in collaboration with Drs. Brian Nielsen, John Shelle and Christine Skelly, I have begun testing various approaches to estimate protein requirements of the exercising horse. My second area of research involves the study of factors controlling the availability of amino acids for milk production. In this area we have examined aspects such as dietary protein intake, blood flow, and more recently, in collaboration with Dr. Jeanne Burton, whether amino acid transport processes pose a limitation on milk protein synthesis. To accomplish the later, we are using a combination of kinetic and molecular approaches to identify and characterize amino acid transport systems and proteins. We hope that the information generated will provide major advances in our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms for milk protein synthesis and the efficiency of amino acid utilization by the mammary gland. My third area of research focuses on the optimization of dietary amino acid utilization to lessen environmental nitrogen losses. Because nitrogen (N) and ammonium (NH4+) are major components of agricultural waste contributing to environmental pollution, the optimization of dietary amino acid utilization during growth or other productive functions has become one of my research priorities. There is discrepancy between studies on growth performance, body composition, and nitrogen status in animals fed reduced crude protein diets to limit nitrogen losses. We are currently focusing on identifying the factors that pose a limitation on dietary crude protein reduction. Better understanding of the dietary manipulations that can reduce nitrogen losses and maintain production efficiencies is needed to assist in designing nutrient management plans.

      Lactation Biology

      Adam Lock, Assistant Professor
      Ruminant Nutrition, Nutritional & Digestive Physiology, Lactation Biology
      Courtney Preseault, Laboratory Manager & Research Technician

      Research in the Lock lab focuses on the regulation and manipulation of ruminant lipid metabolism, allowing improvements in the efficiency of animal production and providing opportunities to design foods that are consistent with consumer perceptions and dietary recommendations. Of particular interest is the effect of diet on the production of bioactive fatty acids in the rumen, their subsequent impact on metabolism and milk fat synthesis in the mammary gland and applying this knowledge to improve our ability to troubleshoot on farm issues related to milk fat depression. The impact of milk on human health, in particular the role of milk fat, is also of special interest.

      Nathalie L. Trottier, Associate Professor
      Non-ruminant Nutrition Laboratory

      The overall objective of my research program is to study factors affecting and regulating amino acid utilization in animals. To accomplish this objective, we have focused on three major areas. The first area is the estimation of amino acid requirements of non-ruminants species at different stages of production. In this area, my primary focus is lactation both in the pig and the horse. Our approach to determine amino acid requirements during lactation uses a combination of the traditional milk amino acid profile as well as mammary amino acid uptake profile. More recently, in collaboration with Drs. Brian Nielsen, John Shelle and Christine Skelly, I have begun testing various approaches to estimate protein requirements of the exercising horse. My second area of research involves the study of factors controlling the availability of amino acids for milk production. In this area we have examined aspects such as dietary protein intake, blood flow, and more recently, in collaboration with Dr. Jeanne Burton, whether amino acid transport processes pose a limitation on milk protein synthesis. To accomplish the later, we are using a combination of kinetic and molecular approaches to identify and characterize amino acid transport systems and proteins. We hope that the information generated will provide major advances in our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms for milk protein synthesis and the efficiency of amino acid utilization by the mammary gland. My third area of research focuses on the optimization of dietary amino acid utilization to lessen environmental nitrogen losses. Because nitrogen (N) and ammonium (NH4+) are major components of agricultural waste contributing to environmental pollution, the optimization of dietary amino acid utilization during growth or other productive functions has become one of my research priorities. There is discrepancy between studies on growth performance, body composition, and nitrogen status in animals fed reduced crude protein diets to limit nitrogen losses. We are currently focusing on identifying the factors that pose a limitation on dietary crude protein reduction. Better understanding of the dietary manipulations that can reduce nitrogen losses and maintain production efficiencies is needed to assist in designing nutrient management plans.

      Michael J. VandeHaar, Professor
      Ruminant Metabolism Laboratory
      Jim Liesman, Research Associate

      My research program includes dairy nutrition and mammary physiology, replacement heifer nutrition and management and nutrition modeling. The major research focus is to identify mechanisms by which nutrition alters mammary development of dairy heifers with emphasis on leptin and the insulin-like growth factor system.

      Miriam S. Weber Nielsen, Associate Professor
      Ruminant Metabolism Laboratory
      Larry Chapin, Research Technician

      Our research program focuses on identifying hormonal and nutritional factors that regulate growth and development of the bovine mammary gland. The emphasis of our current work is on evaluating development of the mammary gland in growing heifers and in response to changes in nutritional management. The laboratory also conducts work to identify factors that regulate proliferation of mammary epithelial cells in vitro. Research involves a variety of techniques including cell culture, immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, cDNA microarrays, Northern blotting, Western blotting, ELISA, radioimmunoassay and others. The overall goal of our research is to identify strategies to more efficiently raise and manage dairy heifers to be productive lactating cows.

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